The Greatest Brine For Smoking Meat Ever...
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  1. #1
    BamaNation First Team ga_tide_fan's Avatar
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    The Greatest Brine For Smoking Meat Ever...

    I used this brine to soak my turkey legs and whole chickens in last weekned and those turkey legs tasted just like the one's you buy at a fair or festival.. Awesome.. The chickens were not bad either....

    1 Bottle of Liquid Smoke
    1 Cup Brown Sugar
    1 Cup Sea Salt
    3/4 Gallon of Water

    Blend all together in large bowl or pan. Marinate meat in brine for 8-12 hours. Place in preheated smoker (obviously). Smoke until done. Turkey legs 3-4 hours, whole chickens 6 hours. Make sure you soak your wood chips too. I used mesquite wood chips... Truly awesome !!!!
    You can't strengthen the weak by weakening the strong...

  2. #2
    Administrator Emeritus & Chef-in-Chief bayoutider's Avatar
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    Smile

    I love brined food especially chickens and turkey. Beef does well also (that's how they make corned beef). I don't often do seafood or pork except whole fish and fresh hams.

    My brine is a little different. No liquid smoke.

    For every gallon of water you need:
    1/2 cup salt (salt lesson: kosher salt weighs less per cup than box salt. When using kosher salt in brines add 1/4 cup salt for every 1/2 cup used totaling 3/4 cup. Sea salt is one of the more expensive salts you can use and it has no flavor benefit, none, nada, zilch. Buy Morton's Kosher salt it is cheap)
    1/2 cup brown sugar - light or dark packed

    To this I like to add - for chicken and turkey:
    couple of quartered oranges
    couple of quartered lemons
    and a few sprigs of fresh rosemary and thyme.
    (instead of the lemon and orange, try some apple juice - unsweetened juice)

    For beef add to the salt and sugar:
    2 tbsp peppercorns
    2 tbsp whole corriander

    For Pork:
    same as for chicken and turkey but as a twist try substituting molasses for the sugar add sliced fresh ginger or some other asian spices. Also try the apple juice. Do try to get unsweetened juice.

    For fish and seafood:
    same as chicken. Try spices like dill or tarragon in moderation. Tarragon is strong.

    Brine has a lot of sugar which can burn on the meat turing it black. If this bothers you, don't brine.

    To dry or not to dry? I suggest rinsing and drying the meat before cooking. Wet chicken and turkey can leave the skin rubbery. Sounds strange but dry the bird with a hair dryer works miracles for a good crispy skin.

    You HAVE to refrigerate the meat while it brines. I had the benefit of an old refrigerator in the garage mostly used to keep beer in that I could remove a shelf and put a 5 gallon plastic bucket full of chickens or turkey in. You HAVE to use a non reactive container (non-metal) DO NOT use galvanized buckets. I have seen people use garbage bags in metal containers. I say do this at your own risk, at least double bag them. When brining using large zip lock bags use a ice chest full of ice for refrigeration. Open the drain to let the water out and keep the ice replaced.

    How long does brine take?
    Whole Chicken 3-8 hrs
    Chicken Pieces 1-2 hrs
    Whole Turkey 12 hrs-2 days
    Turkey Breast 4-8 hrs
    Cornish Game Hens 1-2 hrs
    Shrimp & fish 1-2 hrs
    Pork Chops 2-6 hrs
    Pork Tenderloin 2-8 hrs
    Fresh Ham 12 hrs-2 days
    Pork Ribs 3-5 hours
    Beef Ribs 4-6 hours
    Beef Brisket 12-24 hours
    Whole Pork Loin 1-3 days

    That's probably all I know about brine.

    No it isn't. Brined food cooks faster than non-brined food. Reduce cooking time by about 1/4 to 1/3.
    Last edited by bayoutider; August 16th, 2005 at 11:53 PM.
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  3. #3
    BamaNation First Team
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    Bird Brine

    1/2 cup brown sugar
    1/2 cup pickling salt
    4 cups cranapple juice
    1 tsp. dried basil
    1 tsp. dried thyme

    Place bird in brine overnight. Remove bird and pat dry, then let air dry for an hour before smoking.

  4. #4
    BamaNation All-SEC Dartigan's Avatar
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    Re: The Greatest Brine For Smoking Meat Ever...

    Bumping an old thread, but kudos to me for doing a search, right?!

    Reading another thread about smoking, I now find myself wanting to smoke a boston butt. To the best of my memory, I've never brined a butt overnight. I've "koshered" one by rubbing salt in, letting it stand on a wire rack and washing.

    I've just recently started brining foods, and I'm pleased with the results. Wings brined for 2 hours with honey replacing sugar in the recipe is GREAT!

    Anyway, I'm just looking for feedback on brining a boston butt. Any successes or failures? I will likely buy one tomorrow and brine it overnight. Saturday morning, I'll put it over hickory for 2-3 hours on indirect heat (225-250) and finish it on the gas grill wrapped in foil. I've found after the bark and smoke ring are formed, no additional flavor are imparted and the foil keeps the meat moist.

  5. #5
    Administrator Emeritus & Chef-in-Chief bayoutider's Avatar
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    Smile Re: The Greatest Brine For Smoking Meat Ever...

    There are dozens of brine solutions you can use about all of them are salt, sugar and lots of water plus whatever. I just have one thing to say about liquid smoke. If you are going to put the meat on a smoker what's the point?

    Not saying you have to use my chart but the brine times are on target. Adjust one of the recipes to suit you or find another in a book or online. It's good eats.
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