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  1. #14
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    Re: What % do you think obesity contributes to the health problems in our country?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bamabuzzard View Post
    That's a good question. I'm not sure about that. But I do know there are people (my father in law is a great example) who are predisposed to medical conditions due to genetics regardless if they're over weight or not. My father in law is a very lean person, has always had a high metabolism. His weight falls exactly in the range for someone his size and build. Yet he is on medicine for high blood pressure and cholesterol. His father dropped dead of a massive heart attack at 35 years old. But to your original thought. I don't know if obesity is genetic. My grandma would say "He's just big boned". LOL!
    It is a fact that some genetic traits make individuals more prone to medical issues such as heart disease. There are inherited traits that can be identified in the DNA of individuals that do predispose to disease. Likewise there are individuals who smoke, drink in excess and have poor dietary habits who live to 100.

    One important proven fact however is that rural Chinese, Okinawans, and natives of Papua New Guinea did not have heart disease, breast cancer, colon cancer and other diseases of affluence until KFC and McDonalds arrived. Prior to that Okinawans were the longest lived people on earth.

    It is a verifiable fact that a very large majority of American's who are ill and obese due to their diet and lifestyle. To a great extent we dig our graves with our forks!

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    Re: What % do you think obesity contributes to the health problems in our country?

    Quote Originally Posted by UAH View Post
    One comment I would add to the discussion is the topic of insulin resistance as we age. As background I have fought high blood lipid levels for my adult life. Much of that time being completely ignorant of its role in coronary artery disease. After being diagnosed with CAD many years ago and visiting Dr. Esselstyn at the Cleveland Clinic I undertook a total whole food plant based diet and took my weight back to when I was a skinny guy at 17 graduating from high school. Over the period I have pursued various exercise regimens. In the last year I was able to put in 1200 miles on my Fitbit.

    The important point I wanted to make is that due to all of the exercise I allowed my diet to drift a bit into some tortilla chips, saltines and popcorn. After seeing my BP suddenly elevated and viewing research I believe that I have become insulin resistant and as a result have elevated glucose levels after meals that leads to CV inflammation.

    Based on what I have read and researched over time I would encourage everyone at least by age 60 to undergo a coronary artery scan, have a blood test to assess inflammatory markers and measure their A1C levels (blood glucose levels over prior three month period).

    As an indicator of how pervasive inflammatory disease can be I reviewed a study of a group of distance runners that were monitored over time and received coronary artery scans. What it found was an amazing number of them had coronary plaque (calcium) deposits. Several had extraordinarily high levels of calcium in their arteries.

    I am not a doctor and obviously will appreciate any comments.
    Everyone should have a PCP and see them as often as recommended by the time they reach 40 if not before, but by then it's crucial to get regular check ups.

    Long distance runners may have shorter lifespans than the general population (according to some studies).

    Inflammation absolutely is tied to cardiovascular disease. The flu has long been tied to increased risk for heart attack.

    https://www.drweil.com/health-wellne...-heart-attack/

    Quote Originally Posted by day-day View Post
    How much obesity can be blamed on genetics? Aren't people carrying the same genes that were around when the rate of obesity was at much lower levels? I know a lot of people who are way overweight (maybe not obese by all definitions) who are not on medications; I don't think their genetics are putting the weight on them.

    It can be a tough battle but a proper diet coupled with exercise would improve the overall health of a lot of folks and get them out of the obesity range.
    There does seem to be a genetic link. Genes have been discovered to predispose toward obesity and thinness. Certain ethnic groups tend to maintain higher BMI even with similar caloric intake as others. Not to be flippant, but the science doesn't care much what you think.What %? We don't know.

    I never said every obese person is on medications that cause them to be obese. That is a gross distortion, but unless you know every medication those people are on you are just assuming. The whole point of me discussing that was to point out how bias (hello!) plays a part in how people are treated - in this case I focused on how they are treated by medical personnel, and it's not good.

    Comparing a relatively wealthy population where food is plentiful and readily available to yesteryear is not really a good comparison.
    I do agree with your last statement for the most part.
    Quote Originally Posted by DzynKingRTR View Post
    I have my yearly physical on the 8th of March. I am always concerned about the results. My father died of a heart attack at 50 years old. He was not obese at all just had a ticking time bomb of a clogged artery. I am getting closer and closer to that age (only 43 right now). My dad was a heavy smoker (I have never touched it). My dad was also a heavy drinker (I am not). I used to drink heavily, but having your dad drop dead of a heart attack will sober your butt up quick. I am a bit overweight, but I am trying to get back out of bad habits. I was in shape and doing well until I got hit by a car and stopped exercising (I actually physically couldn't). It made me lazy and I got used to not exercising. I am trying again, as a matter of fact I am headed out to do it right now.
    Sorry about your dad. You are wise to take care of yourself.

    Quote Originally Posted by UAH View Post
    It is a fact that some genetic traits make individuals more prone to medical issues such as heart disease. There are inherited traits that can be identified in the DNA of individuals that do predispose to disease. Likewise there are individuals who smoke, drink in excess and have poor dietary habits who live to 100.

    One important proven fact however is that rural Chinese, Okinawans, and natives of Papua New Guinea did not have heart disease, breast cancer, colon cancer and other diseases of affluence until KFC and McDonalds arrived. Prior to that Okinawans were the longest lived people on earth.

    It is a verifiable fact that a very large majority of American's who are ill and obese due to their diet and lifestyle. To a great extent we dig our graves with our forks!
    Good points.
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    Re: What % do you think obesity contributes to the health problems in our country?

    I don't know the answer to the question, but it's a lot.

    It's hard to tell how much is genetics, how much is our own behavior, and how much is obesity itself vs. common causes. As in, the incidence of all kinds of cancers goes up with weight. Did the weight itself cause the problem, or was the cancer caused by doing stuff that also makes you overweight? And is that a distinction without a difference?

    As for me, I could stand to lose 5-7 pounds, but I'm not really overweight. What I am is soft.

    Long story short, I should soon be out of excuses for not exercising, and will be back on a regular schedule of medium-intensity CrossFit. That has a bad rep from some folks who obsess over it. But the underlying concepts -- mixed weight training and cardio, scalable to your fitness level, with minimal requirements for equipment -- are sound. Just don't get stupid with it.
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    Re: What % do you think obesity contributes to the health problems in our country?

    Quote Originally Posted by UAH View Post
    It is a fact that some genetic traits make individuals more prone to medical issues such as heart disease. There are inherited traits that can be identified in the DNA of individuals that do predispose to disease. Likewise there are individuals who smoke, drink in excess and have poor dietary habits who live to 100.

    One important proven fact however is that rural Chinese, Okinawans, and natives of Papua New Guinea did not have heart disease, breast cancer, colon cancer and other diseases of affluence until KFC and McDonalds arrived. Prior to that Okinawans were the longest lived people on earth.

    It is a verifiable fact that a very large majority of American's who are ill and obese due to their diet and lifestyle. To a great extent we dig our graves with our forks!
    You know that isn't the first time I've heard this and have always been baffled by it. Maybe because I mistakenly took it literally as in "No one from these areas EVER had heart disease, breast cancer, colon cancer etc. until fast food chains entered their society." Or is it not that people didn't have it, just it was not as common as it is in U.S.? Because I have known people who never smoked, drinked a drop of alcohol and didn't eat enough fried or fast foods in their lifetime to matter. Who died of heart disease, some form of cancer or struggled with high blood pressure and/or cholesterol. Heck, just last night I was attending my oldest son's scrimmage game and was talking to a guy in the medical field who is vegan and has been for years. He's 43 and he's having problems keeping his blood pressure and cholesterol down. He is very frustrated because he literally told me "I'm doing everything I know to do. But I guess my parents gifted me with bad genes."

    So people in the places you mentioned only developed these health issues when fast food was introduced to their society?


    And I completely agree the majority of Americans do not do themselves any favors by the diet they choose to have. Walk into any restaurant, retail store, doctor's office, sporting event etc. and just look at how many overweight people you see. It's alarming.
    Last edited by Bamabuzzard; February 28th, 2019 at 09:54 AM.
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    Re: What % do you think obesity contributes to the health problems in our country?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bamabuzzard View Post
    You know that isn't the first time I've heard this and have always been baffled by it. Maybe because I mistakenly took it literally as in "No one from these areas EVER had heart disease, breast cancer, colon cancer etc. until fast food chains entered their society." Or is it not that people didn't have it, just it was not as common as it is in U.S.? Because I have known people who never smoked, drinked a drop of alcohol and didn't eat enough fried or fast foods in their lifetime to matter. Who died of heart disease, some form of cancer or struggled with high blood pressure and/or cholesterol. Heck, just last night I was attending my oldest son's scrimmage game and was talking to a guy in the medical field who is vegan and has been for years. He's 43 and he's having problems keeping his blood pressure and cholesterol down. He is very frustrated because he literally told me "I'm doing everything I know to do. But I guess my parents gifted me with bad genes."

    So people in the places you mentioned only developed these health issues when fast food was introduced to their society?
    There’s almost never zero incidence of any medical condition, good or bad, regardless of circumstances.

    I think he meant.that before KFC, McD’s, etc., those conditions were rare. But now, after 30+ years exposure, they’re much more common.
    You can't reason a man out of a position he didn't reason himself into.

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    Re: What % do you think obesity contributes to the health problems in our country?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bamabuzzard View Post
    You know that isn't the first time I've heard this and have always been baffled by it. Maybe because I mistakenly took it literally as in "No one from these areas EVER had heart disease, breast cancer, colon cancer etc. until fast food chains entered their society." Or is it not that people didn't have it, just it was not as common as it is in U.S.? Because I have known people who never smoked, drinked a drop of alcohol and didn't eat enough fried or fast foods in their lifetime to matter. Who died of heart disease, some form of cancer or struggled with high blood pressure and/or cholesterol. Heck, just last night I was attending my oldest son's scrimmage game and was talking to a guy in the medical field who is vegan and has been for years. He's 43 and he's having problems keeping his blood pressure and cholesterol down. He is very frustrated because he literally told me "I'm doing everything I know to do. But I guess my parents gifted me with bad genes."

    So people in the places you mentioned only developed these health issues when fast food was introduced to their society?
    There have been many very broad studies of the affect of diet on longevity. The China Study by T Colin Campbell is summarized here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_China_Study

    The Okinawan Centenarian Study is summarized here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okinawa_Centenarian_Study there have been follow on studies in Japan as to why Okinawa life span and disease statistics have changed so dramatically over the last thirty years.

    There are many other studies around the world such as the Mediterranean Diet Study that attempt to understand why other societies have such extremely low mortality rates in comparison to the US that has nearly 800,000 strokes per year (one every six minutes) and over 600,000 deaths from heart disease annually.

  7. #20
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    Re: What % do you think obesity contributes to the health problems in our country?

    Quote Originally Posted by UAH View Post
    There have been many very broad studies of the affect of diet on longevity. The China Study by T Colin Campbell is summarized here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_China_Study

    The Okinawan Centenarian Study is summarized here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okinawa_Centenarian_Study there have been follow on studies in Japan as to why Okinawa life span and disease statistics have changed so dramatically over the last thirty years.

    There are many other studies around the world such as the Mediterranean Diet Study that attempt to understand why other societies have such extremely low mortality rates in comparison to the US that has nearly 800,000 strokes per year (one every six minutes) and over 600,000 deaths from heart disease annually.
    I would also throw in there stress level of corporate/working America as well. We have people retire in our department who've put in 30+ years. They'll come back to visit six months to a year later and they literally look 10-15 years younger. It's amazing. Stress will put you in the grave as well.
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    Re: What % do you think obesity contributes to the health problems in our country?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bamabuzzard View Post
    I would also throw in there stress level of corporate/working America doesn't help either. We have people retire in our department who've put in 30+ years. They'll come back to visit six months to a year later and they literally look 10-15 years younger. It's amazing. Stress will put you in the grave as well.
    I often say that to my wife who is working in a large corporation. They are perfectly designed to make people ill. It certainly did it to me. The constant pressure drove all sorts of ailments. Prilosec was the drug of the day to battle reflux.

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    Re: What % do you think obesity contributes to the health problems in our country?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bamabuzzard View Post
    I would also throw in there stress level of corporate/working America as well. We have people retire in our department who've put in 30+ years. They'll come back to visit six months to a year later and they literally look 10-15 years younger. It's amazing. Stress will put you in the grave as well.
    You had mentioned fasting in an earlier post on this thread. I believe that fasting or fasting mimicking diets (Valter Longo) has very good potential for reversing DNA damage from ageing and lifestyle. I have fasting near the top of my to do list and would appreciate the sources you have taken your fasting methodology from. I would prefer not to spend significant sums in order to eat less unless I was convinced the product would be of significant benefit.

    The Valter Longo foundation have some excellent thoughts on a daily longevity diet and exercise https://valterlongo.com/daily-longevity-diet/
    Last edited by UAH; February 28th, 2019 at 12:39 PM.

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    Re: What % do you think obesity contributes to the health problems in our country?

    Quote Originally Posted by UAH View Post
    You had mentioned fasting in an earlier post on this thread. I believe that fasting or fasting mimicking diets (Valter Longo) has very good potential for reversing DNA damage from ageing and lifestyle. I have fasting near the top of my to do list and would appreciate the sources you have taken your fasting methodology from. I would prefer not to spend significant sums in order to eat less unless I was convinced the product would be of significant benefit.

    The Valter Longo foundation have some excellent thoughts on a daily longevity diet and exercise https://valterlongo.com/daily-longevity-diet/
    Yeah, I've been intermittent fasting and carb cycling for a while. My wife did the below program with a co-worker and I basically hi-jacked the fasting part of it from that. I absolutely love it and it has become my lifestyle. I know there are a lot of programs that say you have to do the fasting with their way of eating. But that's BS. You can fast and get the benefits without having to use someone's specific eating method. Here's what I do though.

    Food:
    I carb cycle. I have four "regular" or normal carb days and three low carb days. On my "regular" carb days I eat between 2,000-2,500 calories and my low carb days I eat anywhere between 1,600-1,800 calories. I pay more attention to my macros than I do calories. BUT, I don't completely ignore my calories. I have MyFitnessPal app setup to help me track my daily caloric intake and macros. I eat whole to minimally processed foods. I drink a lot of water and unsweetened tea with lemon/lime mixed in. Three to four times a week I drink one glass of 8-9 oz of red wine (Cabernet).

    Fasting:
    I fast 16 hours everyday. I don't eat past 8 pm and will not eat again until 12 noon the next day. I have an 8 hour "feeding window" to consume all of my calories for the day. So for example, take last night, I didn't get home until 8:30 pm because of my son's baseball game. So, I didn't eat lunch today until 12:30 or after. However, I will consume all of my calories by 8 pm tonight to get back on track with my fasting and eating schedule.

    Exercise:
    I lift weights and do resistance training 40-45 minutes four to five times a week. Every few weeks I'll get my elliptical machine and do 40 minutes of cardio twice a week.

    Results- I feel great. My mind is a lot clearer and a lot sharper. I used to have problems with losing my train of thought, memory seemed to be slipping a bit and I'd go through periods of the day where I just felt like my mind was in a "fog". I also had focus issues. All of that is gone. Of course the weight loss (I've lost over 52 lbs). But really, that becomes secondary when you start to realize how much better you feel and how much sharper your mind is. I will say this though. When carb cycling and combining that with weight training and fasting. You have to be careful not to lose too much weight too fast. Because you won't hit any plateaus. The weight just starts pouring off. I hope this helps.


    https://www.fasterwaytofatloss.com/#content
    Last edited by Bamabuzzard; February 28th, 2019 at 02:41 PM.
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  11. #24
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    Re: What % do you think obesity contributes to the health problems in our country?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bamabuzzard View Post
    Yeah, I've been intermittent fasting and carb cycling for a while. My wife did the below program with a co-worker and I basically hi-jacked the fasting part of it from that. I absolutely love it and it has become my lifestyle. I know there are a lot of programs that say you have to do the fasting with their way of eating. But that's BS. You can fast and get the benefits without having to use someone's specific eating method. Here's what I do though.

    Food:
    I carb cycle. I have four "regular" or normal carb days and three low carb days. On my "regular" carb days I eat between 2,000-2,500 calories and my low carb days I eat anywhere between 1,600-1,800 calories. I pay more attention to my macros than I do calories. BUT, I don't completely ignore my calories. I have MyFitnessPal app setup to help me track my daily caloric intake and macros. I eat whole to minimally processed foods. I drink a lot of water and unsweetened tea with lemon/lime mixed in. Three to four times a week I drink one glass of 8-9 oz of red wine (Cabernet).

    Fasting:
    I fast 16 hours everyday. I don't eat past 8 pm and will not eat again until 12 noon the next day. I have an 8 hour "feeding window" to consume all of my calories for the day. So for example, take last night, I didn't get home until 8:30 pm because of my son's baseball game. So, I didn't eat lunch today until 12:30 or after. However, I will consume all of my calories by 8 pm tonight to get back on track with my fasting and eating schedule.

    Exercise:
    I lift weights and do resistance training 40-45 minutes four to five times a week. Every few weeks I'll get my elliptical machine and do 40 minutes of cardio twice a week.

    Results- I feel great. My mind is a lot clearer and a lot sharper. I used to have problems with losing my train of thought, memory seemed to be slipping a bit and I'd go through periods of the day where I just felt like my mind was in a "fog". I also had focus issues. All of that is gone. Of course the weight loss (I've lost over 52 lbs). But really, that becomes secondary when you start to realize how much better you feel and how much sharper your mind is. I will say this though. When carb cycling and combining that with weight training and fasting. You have to be careful not to lose too much weight too fast. Because you won't hit any plateaus. The weight just starts pouring off. I hope this helps.


    https://www.fasterwaytofatloss.com/#content
    Until I got married 23 years ago I never ate before noon or after 8 PM (unless I hadn't had anything all day) because I just was not hungry at those times. I've been brow beaten into eating breakfast more than you can imgine when I'm still never hungry in the morning.

    I'm going to try that fasting routine for the month of March and just see what happens. I eat very little that's not good for me but have trouble getting enough exercise due to a foot ailment but it's getting better.

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    Re: What % do you think obesity contributes to the health problems in our country?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bamabuzzard View Post
    Yeah, I've been intermittent fasting and carb cycling for a while. My wife did the below program with a co-worker and I basically hi-jacked the fasting part of it from that. I absolutely love it and it has become my lifestyle. I know there are a lot of programs that say you have to do the fasting with their way of eating. But that's BS. You can fast and get the benefits without having to use someone's specific eating method. Here's what I do though.

    Food:
    I carb cycle. I have four "regular" or normal carb days and three low carb days. On my "regular" carb days I eat between 2,000-2,500 calories and my low carb days I eat anywhere between 1,600-1,800 calories. I pay more attention to my macros than I do calories. BUT, I don't completely ignore my calories. I have MyFitnessPal app setup to help me track my daily caloric intake and macros. I eat whole to minimally processed foods. I drink a lot of water and unsweetened tea with lemon/lime mixed in. Three to four times a week I drink one glass of 8-9 oz of red wine (Cabernet).

    Fasting:
    I fast 16 hours everyday. I don't eat past 8 pm and will not eat again until 12 noon the next day. I have an 8 hour "feeding window" to consume all of my calories for the day. So for example, take last night, I didn't get home until 8:30 pm because of my son's baseball game. So, I didn't eat lunch today until 12:30 or after. However, I will consume all of my calories by 8 pm tonight to get back on track with my fasting and eating schedule.

    Exercise:
    I lift weights and do resistance training 40-45 minutes four to five times a week. Every few weeks I'll get my elliptical machine and do 40 minutes of cardio twice a week.

    Results- I feel great. My mind is a lot clearer and a lot sharper. I used to have problems with losing my train of thought, memory seemed to be slipping a bit and I'd go through periods of the day where I just felt like my mind was in a "fog". I also had focus issues. All of that is gone. Of course the weight loss (I've lost over 52 lbs). But really, that becomes secondary when you start to realize how much better you feel and how much sharper your mind is. I will say this though. When carb cycling and combining that with weight training and fasting. You have to be careful not to lose too much weight too fast. Because you won't hit any plateaus. The weight just starts pouring off. I hope this helps.


    https://www.fasterwaytofatloss.com/#content
    Thanks for that. In the past I had a lot of issues with brain fog on weekends. I believe likely caused from variations in glucose levels. Of course as I age I become more concerned with dementia and attempt to address that with diet and exercise. I have very low body fat now with a BMI around 21 and have to conscious of that in the way I approach fasting and resistant training.

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    Re: What % do you think obesity contributes to the health problems in our country?

    Quote Originally Posted by NationalTitles17 View Post

    Long distance runners may have shorter lifespans than the general population (according to some studies).
    if that's the case, then i'm screwed but the last few years, i am in the boat similar to what 4q basket case mentioned, i am about 8-10lbs over what i would like to be. and i am soft/out of shape.

    lucky for me i have a pretty high metabolism and i have never been able to eat large amounts of food at one sitting, so i tend not to overeat too much and i tend not to carry too much weight. over the last several months i have been pretty consistent during the week of having a blender full of smoothie (almond milk, chia seeds, blue berries, bananas, kale) every morning then a salad for lunch. then i just eat whatever in the evening. and i like beer.
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