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  1. #40
    Senior Administrator TIDE-HSV's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Go Bama View Post
    Known as the "Der Gabelschwanz Teuful" (The Fork-tailed Devil) by German pilots, the P-38 was the only American fighter to remain in production throughout the entire war.
    Its range was greater than any other fighter, even with two engines, because it had more fuel storage room. Also, it was more maneuverable, particularly to the left, because its two propellers rotated in opposite directions, in balance. In contrast, a fighter on its tail had to fight the torque of the engine to turn left...
    "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity. - Ellen Parr"

    'If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?' - Steve Jobs

    “I would rather live my life as if there is a god and die to find out there isn't, than live my life as if there isn't and die to find out there is.” Albert Camus

    "When Fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross." - Sinclair Lewis

  2. #41
    BamaNation Hall of Fame BamaFlum's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by TIDE-HSV View Post
    Its range was greater than any other fighter, even with two engines, because it had more fuel storage room. Also, it was more maneuverable, particularly to the left, because its two propellers rotated in opposite directions, in balance. In contrast, a fighter on its tail had to fight the torque of the engine to turn left...
    Weren’t also extremely fast in a dive?


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  3. #42
    BamaNation Hall of Fame Go Bama's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by TIDE-HSV View Post
    Its range was greater than any other fighter, even with two engines, because it had more fuel storage room. Also, it was more maneuverable, particularly to the left, because its two propellers rotated in opposite directions, in balance. In contrast, a fighter on its tail had to fight the torque of the engine to turn left...
    A lot of your posts pique my curiosity. I didn’t know much about the P-38 so went looking for information.

    In Europe the P-38J had issues with engine failure. It was thought at the time that the problem was Champion spark plugs failing but more likely the problem was lower grade fuel quality in Britain. This is why the P-38was used less than in ETO than in the Pacific.

    I did not realize that about the maneuverability to the left but it makes perfect sense. It was a great plane.

  4. #43
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    June 10, 1944: It's now Saturday, and the construction of the Arromanches and Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer artificial harbors begin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mulberry_harbour). The Bazenville airfield close to Bayeux and that of Cardonville in the South of Grandcamp and Maisy becomes operational.

    American troops continue their offensive in the northwest towards Cherbourg and southwest of Utah Beach in direction of Carentan, which represents a major objective for the Ally, being the crossroads linking the Calvados and Cotentin regions. The 506th regiment of the 101st Airborne ( is on the way towards Carentan, just like the 327th Glider Regiment which captures the village of Brevands in the northwest of Carentan. South of Omaha Beach, the troops of the 2nd American Infantry Division capture the localities of Trévières and Rubercy.

    The town of Oradour-sur-Glane in central France is destroyed, with nearly all of its 652 inhabitants killed by troops of the SS Division Das Reich; the dead include about 200 women and children burned to death in the church.

    By the evening of June 10 the Allies have lost nearly 15,000 men: killed, wounded, missing, or POWs.

    Over France, US 8th Air Force attacks airfields and coastal installations with 589 bombers and flies over 1,600 fighter sorties in ground support missions, offensive sorties, escort missions, and defensive patrols over Normandy. US 9th Air Force attacks targets in Normandy with 500 bombers. RAF Bomber Command sends 432 aircraft to attack transportation lines overnight. RAF Lancaster and Halifax bombers attack four airfields in France. At Leval, where German fighter-bombers are operating in attacks on the invasion beaches, the runway is cratered in several places, interrupting sorties for 48 hours.

    In Italy, British 8th Army attacks toward Terni while US 5th Army continues pushing north from Tarquinia and Viterbo. US 12th Air Force aircraft attack multiple targets in support of Allied ground offensive and US 15th Air Force attacks Porto Marghera, Trieste, Ancona, Ferrara, and other targets with 550 bombers.

    Pictured: A platoon of troops of the US Army moving along a farm house as they prepared to eliminate a German sniper up ahead, near Vierville-sur-Mer, France, June 10, 1944; An American paratrooper holds Nazi prisoners at the point of his bayonet, during the American advance into Normandy, in France, on June 10, 1944.; Oradour-sur-Glane, France - This small French village bore the brunt of Nazi brutality on June 10, 1944, when 642 people were either shot or burnt alive.; American A-20 Havoc bombers attacking railways behind German lines in Domfront, Orne, France

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    Oderint dum metuant - Lucius Accius

  5. #44
    Senior Administrator TIDE-HSV's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    The atrocities of the Germans echo even today. My daughter and SIL, a German, operate a restaurant in the Savoie Alps. Their nationalities haven't affected their business. He speaks perfect French and looks more French or even Italian than German. He's a Francophile who lost his MR aunt and uncle to Nazi purification. However, my daughter has had a long battle to get her "green card" (Carte de Sejour). Their immigration lawyer has said that it's purely discrimination because of their nationalities and has threatened suit. Below is an excerpt from warfarehistorynetwork.com. You can understand the feelings of the Savoyards against the Germans...

    Germans Crack Down On Maquis and Town

    In mid-July, La Chapelle en Vercors was shelled. On July 14, American Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bombers dropped 1,500 canisters of arms, ammunition, and other supplies to the embattled Maquis. According to Mattingly, “The inhabitants ran out in the streets shouting and waving to the fliers.… Thirty minutes later the Germans began bombing and strafing the town. This prevented the men from collecting the containers. Only at night was it possible to gather 200 of them. The Germans also started the destruction of La Chapelle en Vercors. The town was ablaze and [enemy] fighters machine-gunned people endeavoring to save their belongings from their homes.”
    Nearly a week later, the Germans assaulted Vassieux with glider troops. The fanatical soldiers of the Waffen SS spearheaded the attack and seized the town. The Maquis counterattacked the Nazis on four separate occasions but were driven back. With no air or artillery support, the resistance fighters took horrendous casualties. In retribution, the Germans began killing innocent civilians.
    "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity. - Ellen Parr"

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    “I would rather live my life as if there is a god and die to find out there isn't, than live my life as if there isn't and die to find out there is.” Albert Camus

    "When Fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross." - Sinclair Lewis

  6. #45
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by TIDE-HSV View Post
    Its range was greater than any other fighter, even with two engines, because it had more fuel storage room. Also, it was more maneuverable, particularly to the left, because its two propellers rotated in opposite directions, in balance. In contrast, a fighter on its tail had to fight the torque of the engine to turn left...
    My first knowledge of the P-38 was reading as a kid about Richard Bong being credited with 40 kills in the Pacific Theater flying a P-38. Later on it was the P-38 flight out of Guadalcanal that shot down and killed Admiral Yamamoto over Bougainville. One of the incredible feats of navigation of the war. I have always been fascinated with the Lightening and found it interesting that Charles Lindbergh worked with the P-38 pilots in the Pacific to lean their engines and significantly increase their effective range. Some years ago I had an opportunity to attend several of the War Bird Fly Ins at Oshkosh, WI and among the War Birds were a couple of P-38s. Seeing the plane flying combat acrobatics was incredible and the rate of climb was off the charts. It is one of the greatest aircraft designs in history.

  7. #46
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by BamaFlum View Post
    Weren’t also extremely fast in a dive?


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    Actually, compression was a problem area with them. They were known sometimes to buckle and nose down in a dive. No plane is perfect...
    "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity. - Ellen Parr"

    'If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?' - Steve Jobs

    “I would rather live my life as if there is a god and die to find out there isn't, than live my life as if there isn't and die to find out there is.” Albert Camus

    "When Fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross." - Sinclair Lewis

  8. #47
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by BamaFlum View Post
    Weren’t also extremely fast in a dive?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Ignore my compression remark, after a little research that problem was minimal. They were indeed "Zero Killers," since they could perch up above the altitude the Zeroes could attain and dive down on them, selecting the time and setting of the battle. Here is a long and exhaustive read on why the P-38 disappointed in Europe:

    Historynet
    "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity. - Ellen Parr"

    'If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?' - Steve Jobs

    “I would rather live my life as if there is a god and die to find out there isn't, than live my life as if there isn't and die to find out there is.” Albert Camus

    "When Fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross." - Sinclair Lewis

  9. #48
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    June 11, 1944: The American forces that landed at Utah and Omaha move towards the crossroads city of Carentan. The city is defended by Major Von Heydte and his parachutists who hold and defend the city. The 506th regiment of the 101st Airborne approaches Carentan coming from the North and circumvents the city to the West - they must seize the city in order to allow the tanks of the 29th American Infantry Division to cross it without being worried about snipers.

    The British attack from Tilly-sur-Seulles to Villers-Bocage on the Caen-Vire road. They are practically stopped by the first German Tiger tanks arriving in Normandy: the S.S. Panzerbataillon 101. The German counter-attacks are generally ineffective, however, because of the Allied air superiority.

    The Canadians of the 6th Armored Regiment are stopped by the German tanks South-west of the Mesnil-Patry village. The soldiers of the 51 Highlanders, on the sides of the 6th Airborne Division, defend their positions from the day before the German counter-attacks. The front seems to be stabilized here.

    North-West of Caen, the 6th Battalion of the Green Howards liberates the village of Ducy-Sainte-Marguerite. South of here, three other villages are still in the hands of the German Panzer Lehr forces: Chouain in the South-west, Brouay and Audrieu in the South-east. The 7th Battalion of the Green Howards tries to bore in the South-west but does not manage to cross the line of fire set up by the Panzer Lehr (who gathered the day before). The Panzers inflict very heavy losses on the British who are hole up near the hill 103.

    The British and Canadian troops progress South of Saint-Aubin-sur-Mer towards the village of Cairon, in the valley of the Mue. The men of the 46 Royal Navy Commando liberate the city after furious combat against the fanaticized German soldiers of the 12nd SS Panzer Division Hitlerjugend. In the wake of the battle they liberate the villages of Lasson, Rots and Rosel.

    Over France, US 8th Air Force attacks airfields and transportation lines with 800 bombers. US 9th Air Force attacks targets in Normandy with 129 bombers. US 8th and 9th Air Forces conduct ground support missions, offensive sorties, escort missions, and defensive patrols over Normandy with hundreds of fighters. RAF Bomber Command sends 329 aircraft to attack transportation lines overnight.

    In Italy, British 8th Army captures Cantalupo and attacks around Bagnoregio. Pushing north, US 5th Army captures Montefiascone and Valentano. US 12th Air Force is limited to fighter sorties due to poor weather conditions.

    Pictured: British officers inspecting a PzKpfw IV tank destroyed by the UK Durham Light Infantry, Normandy, France, June 11, 1944; Camouflaged German Tiger I heavy tank, Villers-Bocage, France, Jun 1944; Two disabled M4 Sherman tanks and a litter Jeep near the heavily damaged Église Saint-Ouen in Rots, France (near Caen), Jun 11, 1944; Troops of A Company, 6th Durham Light Infantry Regiment, British 50th Division in Grandcamp-Maisy, France, June 11, 1944; note Sten gun

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  10. #49
    BamaNation Hall of Fame Go Bama's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    The Story of D-Day in 5 Maps

    https://www.vox.com/2014/6/6/5786508/d-day-in-five-maps

    I like a map to help me see where these different towns are in Normandy. I thought others might like this page. Map 4 is of particular interest. It is a gif that shows day by day advancement of the allies. Map 5 is similar but for the whole war.

  11. #50
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    June 12, 1944: After a day of difficult street fighting, the 502nd and 506th regiments of the 101st Airborne manage to control a part of the town of Carentan by early evening. The American forces that landed in Utah and Omaha are now joined, in fact the five beachheads are now joined together and represent a 50 mile long zone from Sainte-Mère-Eglise in the West and to Ouistreham in the East, varying from 5-20 miles of depth from the shoreline. The American 1st Infantry Division liberates the village of Caumont, 18 miles South of Omaha, gaining the benefit of high ground. The British continue battling their way to Villers-Bocage on the Caen-Vire road. The majority of the German armored divisions equipped with Tiger tanks are gathered north and northwest of Caen, and the British suffer heavy losses due to this particularly well-equipped tank.

    As of midnight, June 12, 18 Ally divisions (8 American divisions, 10 British and Canadian divisions) are present in Normandy, representing a total of 326,547 soldiers, 54,186 vehicles and 104,428 tons of materials.

    Alfred Rosenberg, German Reich Minister for the Eastern Occupied Territories, is ordered to start Heuaktion, which calls for the kidnapping of 40,000 Polish children between the age of 10 and 14; they are to be transported to Germany as slave laborers.

    Over France, US 8th Air Force attacks airfields and transportation lines with 1,278 bombers. US 9th Air Force attacks targets with 509 bombers. US 8th and 9th Air Forces conduct ground support missions, offensive sorties, escort missions, and defensive patrols over Normandy with hundreds of fighters. RAF Bomber Command sends 671 aircraft to attack transportation lines overnight.

    Over Germany, RAF Bomber Command sends 303 aircraft to attack Gelsenkirchen and 27 aircraft to attack Cologne overnight.

    In Italy, British 8th Army continues to battle northward while US 5th Army remains engaged with German delaying positions around Orbetello. US 12th Air Force aircraft attack multiple targets in support of Allied ground offensive.

    Pictured: An amphibious Jeep being towed ashore at Normandy, France, Jun 12, 1944. Note that censors have deleted markings on the Jeep's front bumper and an object at the right edge; Wrecks of German Tiger I and Panzer IV tanks, Villers-Bocage, France, Jun 1944; 101st Airborne troops enter Carentan on June 12, 1944. They are accompanied by attached medical personnel and vehicles (their own 1/4-ton trucks and captured enemy vehicles); Map of the progress of Allied forces as of June 12, 1944

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    Oderint dum metuant - Lucius Accius

  12. #51
    Senior Administrator TIDE-HSV's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Tidewater View Post
    Here is a paper about the Schweinfurt raids and the operational pause (Oct 43 - Feb 44) in the bombing campaign.

    Grabow - SCHWEINFURT RAIDS AND THE PAUSE IN DAYLIGHT STRATEGIC BOMBING
    This is a great paper! Among other things, it's a reminder of what a series of blunders wars are. (I started to use a common obscenity but checked myself.)
    "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity. - Ellen Parr"

    'If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?' - Steve Jobs

    “I would rather live my life as if there is a god and die to find out there isn't, than live my life as if there isn't and die to find out there is.” Albert Camus

    "When Fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross." - Sinclair Lewis

  13. #52
    Thread Starter

    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    June 13, 1944: It’s Tuesday - today is D+7, marking 1 week (7 days) since the D-Day Invasion at Normandy and the beginning of the liberation of Europe.

    The 502nd and 506th regiments of the 101st Airborne Division manage to liberate the totality of Carentan. To the southwest, the American 175th Infantry Division must control the high ground above the road connecting Bayeux to Saint-Lô - its units are pinned there by mortars and shootings of heavy machine guns which slow down their progression. The battleship Texas shells the area with its 16-inch batteries without hitting the task force. The American 90th Infantry Division liberates the locality of Pont-L’Abbe, while at the edge of the American and the British sectors, the soldiers of the US 1st Infantry Division liberate the village of Caumont where the Americans fight the 2nd German SS Panzer Division.

    On the British front, the battlefield sees a short lull. Montgomery uses this to reinforce his positions and he slows down the progression of his troops to the North of Caen (which is still not under Allied control). The "Desert Rats" (7th English Armored Division) are attacked close to Villers-Bocage by the heavy tanks led by Michael Wittman. The British losses are so high that they abandon Villers-Bocage and retreat to the north.

    The Germans, benefiting from this victory, counter-attack in direction of Tilly-on-Seulles and of Lingevres. But the British of the 49th and 50th infantry divisions fight back hard and the German armored tanks of the Panzer Lehr Division are scattered. The counter-attack is transformed into an organized retreat, but Caen is still not captured and it seems that many days of intense fightings will be necessary for its liberation.

    Overnight, the Germans launch the first V-1 Flying Bomb (rocket) attack on England - only four of the ten bombs actually hit their targets.

    Over France, US 8th Air Force attacks airfields with 128 bombers in first mission and 208 bombers in second mission. US 8th Air Force fighters conduct ground attacks and escort missions. US 9th Air Force attacks targets with 397 bombers while fighters conduct ground attacks, escort missions, and offensive patrols.

    Over Germany, US 15th Air Force attacks Innsbruck after being forced to abort missions over Munich.

    In Italy, British 8th Army captures Bagnoregio and Narni, and continues pushing toward Orvieto and Terni. US 5th Army makes little northward progress. US 12th Air Force aircraft attack multiple targets in support of Allied ground offensive and attack shipping at Livorno. US 15th Air Force attacks Porto Marghera.

    Pictured: Jeep bringing casualties to a LST for evacuation, Utah Beach, Normandy, France, June 13, 1944; note line of German POWs; British 4.5 inch gun and crew of 211 Battery, 64th Medium Regiment, Royal Artillery in action near Tilly-sur-Seulles, France, June 13, 1944; Wrecked German Tiger I heavy tank, Viller-Bocage, France; The first aerial delivery of beer during the Battle of Normandy was conducted on June 13, 1944 through two 45 gallons tanks carried under the wings of the Spitfire Mk IXb belonging to 412 Squadron (126 Wing) on the occasion of their arrival at the B-4 airfield, Bény-sur-Mer, Calvados. A total of 270 gallons of beer were transported that day.

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    Oderint dum metuant - Lucius Accius

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