75th anniversary of D-Day... - Page 5
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  1. #53
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    June 14, 1944: the American forces begin to move towards the north of Utah Beach. The 9th Infantry Division, near the 4th Infantry Division, is ordered to liberate the town of Quineville - the German Regional Headquarters. They take it rather quickly, slowed only by German artillery. Cherbourg, which needed to be under the Allied control by by today according to the plans made back in May, is still held by the Germans. The American 9th Infantry Division progresses towards Valognes, despite heavy losses. The men of the 82nd Airborne Division attack in direction of the village of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte.

    Northeast of Bayeux, on the beach of Courseulles (Juno Beach), General de Gaulle, chief of the Free French Army, lands after crossing the English Channel aboard destroyer "La Combattante", a ship of the Free French Navy. He meets General Montgomery at his Headquarters at the castle of Creuilly, then goes to Bayeux, which was liberated on June 7, where an immense crowd acclaims him and sings the "Marseillaise". He goes then to the towns of Isigny-sur-Mer and Grandcamp at the end of the afternoon, pressed by the Allies to come back as fast as possible. The new government of the French Republic, called the Provisional Government, is installed in Bayeux.

    Over France, US 8th Air Force attacks airfields, transportation lines, V-weapons sites, and other targets with 983 bombers. US 9th Air Force attacks targets with 500 bombers. Overnight, RAF Bomber Command sends 337 aircraft to attack German ground forces near Caen and 330 aircraft to attack transportation lines.

    During the day, RAF Bomber Command conducts a raid on Le Havre with 325 Lancaster bombers - the German naval forces on the English Channel suffer considerable loss (35 vessels).

    Over Germany, US 8th Air Force attacks Emmerich refinery with 61 bombers and overnight RAF Bomber Command sends 35 aircraft to attack Gelsenkirchen.

    In Italy, elements of British 8th Army capture Orvieto, Terni and Todi. Forces of the US 5th Army also advance, capturing Magliano. The US 4th Corps moves up the Mediterranean coast. US 12th Air Force aircraft attack multiple targets in support of Allied ground offensive.

    Pictured: American troops pass through the streets of Sainte-Mere-Eglise, in Normandy, keeping a sharp lookout for German snipers on June 14, 1944; British 6-pdr anti-tank gun deployed outside Lingevres, June 14, 1944; Aftermath of Battle of Villers-Bocage, June 14, 1944; General de Gaulle's return

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    Oderint dum metuant - Lucius Accius

  2. #54
    Thread Starter

    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    June 15, 1944: the rapid progression by US forces in the days following the D-Day landing has now slowed in the face of solid German resistance. The principal objective of the Americans in the Cotentin peninsula is to capture the town of Cherbourg and its deep water harbor; even with the artificial harbors of Arromanches and Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer now being operational, Allied High Command feels they will be insufficient to supply the campaign, so it is absolutely necessary to capture a deep water harbor which will allow to accommodate huge transport ships of supplies, therefore Cherbourg is the objective number one in Cotentin. But the Germans understand the strategic importance of this city and its harbor and the reinforcements of their defense of Cherbourg start. Before attacking Cherbourg in the north, the Americans decide to join the other end of Cotentin peninsula in order to cut the German reinforcements between the North and the South of Cotentin. They need sufficient soldiers to travel in the east all while maintaining the pressure towards north. In Utah, the fourth American Army corps estimates that manpower is sufficient: the 7th Corps of the General Collins can divide Cotentin in two. US VIII Corps (under Major General Troy Middleton) becomes operational with the 90th Infantry Division and both US Airborne Divisions under its command, and is tasked with protecting the rear of the imminent attack to capture Cherbourg.

    The British try to stop the German retreats by systematically bombarding the areas located on and behind the front line (which seems to remain more or less fixed). A line of cities and villages are attacked by the allied bombers, such as Evrecy and Noyers-Bocage. Benefitting from the effect of devastation of the bombardments, the British armored units attack in the Villers-Bocage direction, but they are once again pushed back by the German Tiger tanks.

    In the skies above France, US 8th Air Force attacks airfields, transportation lines, V-weapons sites, and other targets with 1,000 bombers. US 9th Air Force attacks various strategic targets with 550 bombers and conducts ground attacks, escort missions, and offensive patrols with more than 1,400 fighters. RAF Bomber Command sends 227 aircraft to attack German supply depots overnight and 224 aircraft to attack transportation lines overnight.

    Over Germany, US 8th Air Force attacks Hannover and other targets with 200 bombers. RAF Bomber Command sends 31 aircraft to attack Gelsenkirchen overnight.

    In Italy, British 8th Army captures Ficulle and Allerona and US 5th Army reaches Grosseto. US 12th Air Force aircraft attack La Spezia, Florence, and other targets in support of Allied ground offensive.

    The Germans begin launching a barrage of 244 V-1 flying bombs aimed at London.

    Pictured: Troops from 101st Airborne Division take a break in Carentan, June 15, 1944; French children surround a US Army soldier as he lets them rummage through his rucksack for sweets following the Battle of Carentan and the liberation of the village from German forces, June 15, 1944.; Crew of B-26C Marauder “Carefree Carolyn” of the 552nd Bomb Squadron in front of their airplane after making a wheels-up landing, RAF Great Dunmow, Essex, England, June 15 1944. This was the aircraft’s 100th mission; The artificial harbor of Arromanches

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    Oderint dum metuant - Lucius Accius

  3. #55
    Thread Starter

    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    June 16, 1944: The American progression continues in the Cotentin peninsula. General Collins' VII Corps pushes to the east while the 82nd Airborne Division advances to the north. The 9th Infantry Division, attached to the 7th Corps, liberates Orglandes. Other divisions moving to the west of Cotentin (47th and 60th Infantry divisions) continue their progress. US 1st Army is engaged around St Lo.

    Overnight (between June 15-16) the largest number of V-1 rockets of the entire Battle of Normandy reach London: 244 - the Germans call it the "Day of Vengeance". The King of England, George VI, comes to visit the British troops in Normandy. The British try to continue the progression in the north and the northwest of Caen, under the cover of the aviation. Sword beach is still being hit by German artillery fire.

    With a firm foothold in Normandy, the Allies can now start moving supplies in at a dramatic pace - these supplies are needed to continue the push to liberate France and ultimately defeat Germany.

    Over Germany, RAF Bomber Command sends 321 aircraft to attack Sterkrade and 26 aircraft to attack Berlin overnight. RAF Bomber Command utilizes airborne Mandrel jamming system for the first time.

    Over France, US 8th Air Force attacks airfields, transportation lines, V-weapons sites, and other targets with 313 bombers. US 9th Air Force bombers are grounded by poor weather, but 500 fighters attack transportation lines, operating a small advance echelon from an airfield in Normandy. RAF Bomber Command sends 405 aircraft to attack V-weapons sites overnight.

    In Italy, British 8th Army forces continue to advance. The 10th Corps captures Spoleto and penetrates to Spoligno. Forces of the US 5th Army take Grosseto. US 12th Air Force aircraft attack multiple targets in support of Allied ground offensive.

    Pictured: Military vehicles move ashore from Mulberry Artificial Harbor A, across a pontoon bridge, to Omaha Beach, Normandy, France, June 16, 1944 (D+10). Visible are M3 Halftracks, an M8 Greyhound, and AFKWX 2˝-ton Trucks.; Soldiers of the US 82nd Airborne Division. Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte, June 16, 1944; Ruins in Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte. In this devastated neighborhood, one house was somehow left intact, June 16, 1944; Sgt. R.A. Garbutt of the 19th R.C.A. Field Regiment showing shrapnel holes made in the radiator of his vehicle by a German 88mm gun, June, 16 1944

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  4. #56
    Thread Starter

    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    June 17, 1944: US operations in the Cotentin peninsula aimed at cutting the German lines are continuing and the many villages and towns that are on the road to the US VII Corps are liberated, such as Magneville or Néhou, reached on the evening by elements of the US 60th Infantry Division. The 47th U.S. Infantry Division frees the city of Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte. The US 1st Army cuts off the Contentin Peninsula - the US 9th Division (part of US VII Corps) reaches the west coast to the north and south of Barneville. German divisions isolated to the north are stopped as they attempt to break out.

    For the British, the going is far more difficult: as the Green Howards reach the town of Longraye, defenders of the Panzer-Lehr do not yield an inch - the British are violently repelled by the German tanks and artillery. The German defense line north of Caen stands firm.

    Hitler meets with Rundstedt, Commander in Chief (west), and Rommel, commanding Army Group B. Both Field Marshals seek a withdrawal to more defensible positions inland. Hitler refuses to allow a retreat from Normandy - he believes that the V1 bombing of Britain will force it out of the war.

    In the skies over France, US 8th Air Force attacks airfields with 231 bombers, then follows up with a second attack with 273 bombers. US 8th Air Force fighters fly 1,027 escort and ground attack sorties. US 9th Air Force attacks targets with 265 bombers and conducts escort and ground attack missions with more than 1,300 fighters. RAF Bomber Command sends 317 aircraft to attack transportation lines and 114 aircraft to attack V-weapons site near Abbeville overnight.

    Eighteen Lancaster bombers from British No. 617 Squadron attacked German V-1 launch sites on the coast of the English Channel.

    USAAF First Lieutenant William "Swede" Anderson of the 356th Fighter Squadron, 354th Fighter Group, returning to base after a ground-strafing sortie over France in his P-51B "Swede's Steed II" spots a V1 Flying bomb and promptly shoots it down. In doing so he became the first USAAF pilot to record a V1 kill. After landing the 23-year-old Anderson excitedly asked "How many 'Doodlebugs' make an ace?"

    In Italy, British 8th Army advances beyond the Chieti River along the Adriatic coast, pushing toward Perugia. The Polish 2nd Corps replaces the British 10th Corps in the line. Meanwhile, the French 9th Colonial (Senegalese) Division (General de Lattre) lands on Elba Island. US 5th Army continues to pursue the retreating Germans northward. US 12th Air Force is restricted to a few fighter missions by poor weather conditions.

    Pictured: Tribute to a killed American soldier erected by French civilians, Carentan, France, June 17, 1944; Sherman tanks of UK 30th Corps passing through Bayeaux, France, June 17, 1944; Men of the 5/7th Gordon Highlanders occupy a defensive position in a hedge, June 17, 1944.; A French woman rummaging through the ruins of her home in Orglandes, June 17, 1944

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    Oderint dum metuant - Lucius Accius

  5. #57
    Thread Starter

    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    June 18, 1944: The prime objective of the US 7th Corps is achieved: the Cotentin peninsula is cut in two along a line which connects Utah Beach and Barneville. The nearly 40,000 German forces which defend the surroundings of Cherbourg, the new objective of the VII Corps, are separated from reinforcements and supplies. The Americans maintain the pressure and keep bombarding the German lines of defense which move back hour after hour. The engagements are violent and German morale is low as elements of US 1st Army isolate Cherbourg.

    The American attacks towards the north below a line connecting Montebourg to the East, Valognes in the center and Les-Pieux in the West. The Allied navy gathers off the coast of Cherbourg to support the ground forces through their progression and to prepare the bombardments of the fortifications protecting the Germans in the city and its deep water harbor. In the east of Cotentin, the 4th American Infantry division attacks in the towards Montebourg.

    On the British front, north and northwest of Caen, the engagements between mechanized infantry divisions are fierce and it appears the liberation of the capital of the Calvados will take much longer than expected. This is disastrous for the Allied aviators who do not have enough territory to install runways. On the other hand, German armored divisions are pulled towards the east of Normandy, thus relieving pressure on the Americans on the western front. A new battle begins in the areas around Tilly.

    Over France, US 8th Air Force attacks V-weapons site at Watten with 58 bombers. US 9th Air Force attacks V-weapons sites and transportation lines with 120 bombers. RAF Bomber Command sends 10 aircraft to attack V-weapons site near St Omer overnight.

    Over Germany, US 8th Air Force attacks Hamburg, Hannover, and targets of opportunity with 1,239 bombers.

    A V-1 rocket strikes the Guards Chapel across from Buckingham Palace in London during worship services, killing 119. Winston Churchill impresses on Dwight Eisenhower that there must be no change of plans as a result of the V-1 attacks; London and the southeast will endure the bombardment as long as necessary.

    In Italy, elements of British 8th Army capture Assisi and continue to advance toward Perugia. Elements of the French Expeditionary Corps (part of US 5th Army) enter Radicofani in the west on their way to Florence.

    Pictured: Brigadier General Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. in his Jeep 'Rough Rider' near the front lines in Normandy; Reinforcements for initial allied invaders of Normandy, long lines of troops and supply trucks begin their march on June 18, 1944; 105 mm Self Propelled Gun M-7 'Priest' of the 14th Armored Field Battalion/2nd Armored Division passes through Rue Holgate, Carentan. June 18, 1944; Map of VII Corps’ progress in the Cotentin Peninsula

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  6. #58
    Thread Starter

    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    The scale of what was happening 75 years ago is impossible to imagine, but sometimes I get a small glimmer of understanding and it's mind-boggling. Like this: "Over Germany, US 8th Air Force attacks Hamburg, Hannover, and targets of opportunity with 1,239 bombers."

    1,239 bombers - just imagine the preparation, the amount of fuel, munitions, etc it takes to pull that off. And that's one cog in the machine the Allies had humming along against the Nazis. Just incredible!
    Oderint dum metuant - Lucius Accius

  7. #59
    Thread Starter

    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    June 19, 1944: The US progress in the north Cotentin continues as the 4th American Infantry Division liberates the town of Montebourg. The battle around the city of Valognes, which straddles the road Cherbourg, is still in the hands of the German forces, who resist violently.

    The weather is bad in Normandy which limits air support, but more importantly the artificial harbors of Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer Arromanches are damaged by a storm in the Channel which has increased in intensity over the last three days - the waves destroy the assembled pieces of the harbor. With confusion rampant on both artificial harbors, vessels also run aground, some sink and floating bridges break their moorings. The Allied forces face a major problem: they are heavily dependent on food, equipment, ammunition and fuel supplies coming from the harbors. The front supply is heavily delayed and Operation Epsom (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Epsom) - planned by general Montgomery, which aims at finally breaking the front northwest of Caen - is delayed. However, battles continue in the vicinity of Tilly, which is liberated during the day, and British troops appear to progress again after several days without much progress.

    Over France, RAF Bomber Command sends 21 aircraft to attack V-weapons site near St Omer in a daylight raid. US 8th Air Force attacks airfields with 259 bombers escorted by 217 fighters. US 8th Air Force also attacks V-weapons sites with 201 bombers in the morning and 270 bombers in the afternoon. The 368th Fighter Group of US 9th Air Force becomes the first USAAF unit to transfer to a base in France.

    In Italy, The British 8th Army reaches the south and east side of Trasimeno Lake. This advance brings the army near the German-held Albert Line. US 5th Army continues to press northward against German delaying. US 12th Air Force is mostly grounded by poor weather but fighters fly patrol and support missions to Elba.

    Pictured: An American soldier gives a drink of water to a wounded German prisoner lying on a stretcher somewhere in the Normandy battle area, June 19, 1944; The wreckage of a universal carrier blown up by a landmine in Tilly-sur-Seulles, June 19, 1944; US soldiers are seen as they take cover in a roadside ditch in the small Normandy town of St. Sauveur Le Vicomte, near Cherbourg, on June 19, 1944; Waves batter the "Mulberry" artificial harbor off "Omaha" Beach, during the great storm of June 19-22, 1944. Photographed from alongside the old British battleship Centurion, which had been sunk as a breakwater and anti-aircraft emplacement.

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  8. #60
    BamaNation Hall of Fame Tidewater's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by GrayTide View Post
    I've posted this in D-Day threads before but will repeat it since I believe it is something we should not forget. My wife's father, who I never met, landed in France in a glider on D-Day, he was in the 101st Airborne. He later won a Bronze Star and Purple Heart in action at Bastogne.
    327th Glider Infantry or 401st?
    I served in C/2-327th (well after they trade in their gliders for choppers).
    I think the glider regiment of the 101st consisted or 1-327th GIR, 2-327th GIR and 1-401st GIR. Since then they have reflagged the third battalion as 3-327th IR (and even for a few years post 911, as 3-506th PIR).
    Last edited by Tidewater; June 19th, 2019 at 10:09 AM.

  9. #61
    BamaNation Hall of Fame GrayTide's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Tidewater View Post
    327th Glider Infantry or 401st?
    I served in C/2-327th (well after they trade in their gliders for choppers).
    I think the glider regiment of the 101st consisted or 1-327th GIR, 2-327th GIR and 1-401st GIR. Since then they have reflagged the third battalion as 3-327th IR (and even for a few years post 911, as 3-506th PIR).
    Pretty sure it was the 327th, but would not wager on it.
    Last edited by GrayTide; June 19th, 2019 at 12:25 PM.
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  10. #62
    BamaNation Hall of Fame Tidewater's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by crimsonaudio View Post
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    A tour guide told me an anecdote. Once De Gaulle finally got ashore, no one greeted him (at least no commensurate with De Gaulle's self-perceived stature). Everyone in France knew his voice from the BBC French language service, but nobody had seen him. De Gaulle himself flagged down a French cop peddling a bike furiously towards Juno. "What's the rush?" De Gaulle asked.
    "I have to get to the the Canadian beach," the cop told De Gaulle. "De Gaulle is coming!"

    Apocryphal, but if it ain't true, it ought to be.

    De Gaulle/Free French Monument, Juno.
    https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1928/...c46e2f65_b.jpg
    Last edited by Tidewater; June 19th, 2019 at 08:16 PM.

  11. #63
    Thread Starter

    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    June 20, 1944: It’s Tuesday - today is D+14, marking 2 weeks (14 days) since the D-Day Invasion at Normandy and the beginning of the liberation of Europe.

    The strong storm remains in the English Channel while the Allied meteorologists hope for a return of good weather in the next two days. The artificial harbors of Arromanches and Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer have been severely damaged and repairs are needed immediately. Many small boats sunk due to the storm. During this time, necessary landings supplies for the continuation of military operations are slowed and the British forces progress very slowly despite the fact that the the resistance seems to be lessening. On the western front, the American forces continue their difficult progress. 4th Infantry division reaches Valognes where fierce street battles being. The bombing of the districts still not controlled by American forces continues, while elements of the 12th Infantry Regiment reach Le Theil (which gives them the high ground in this sector of the Cotentin peninsula). The Germans begin to give up their positions to join the defense line of Cherbourg. General Collins, chief of the 7th American Corps, sends three additional divisions in reinforcement without the usual artillery preparation. This offensive pushes the last German defensive positions from Montebourg and makes it possible for the American forces to reach the outskirts of Cherbourg. The US forces advance by using the strategy of the "chip jumps" adapted to the Normand bocage. Between Cherbourg and Valognes American forces discover an immense building deserted since D-Day. It is a large (525' x 180', according to plans) launching base for V-2 rockets - only a 10% base had been built when the Normandy landings began.

    Over France, RAF Bomber Command sends 20 aircraft to attack V-weapons site near Wizernes and US 9th Air Force attacks V-weapons sites with 370 bombers. US 9th Air Force attacks enemy ground troops, transportation lines, and other targets in the Normandy battle area with more than 1,000 fighters.

    Over Germany, US 8th Air Force attacks Hamburg, Koenigsberg, Magdeburg and other targets with 1,257 bombers escorted by 760 fighters - 48 bombers are lost.

    In Italy, British 8th Army captures Perugia but encounters stiffening resistance elsewhere. US 5th Army delayed by German rear guards south of Lake Trasimene. US 12th Air Force attacks transportation lines and other targets.

    Pictured: American soldiers rest in front of a rural grocery store after advancing inland, a French citizen smiles from the doorway.; Knocked-out German 4.7 cm PaK(t) auf Panzerkampfwagen 35R(f) self-propelled gun, Le Molay-Littry, France, June 20, 1944; These two American landing craft set high and dry on the beach of the Normandy Coast of France on June 20, 1944 as unloading operations continue while crewmen await return of the tide to re-float them.; Two German soldiers surrendered to a solitary American soldier in Barneville, on the west coast of the Cherbourg peninsula, in France, on June 20, 1944. The Americans pushed through the town like a whirlwind after the Germans who are now in full retreat for Cherbourg. The prisoners were turned over to the local police and lodged in the town'’s jail.

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  12. #64
    BamaNation Hall of Fame Go Bama's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    The US forces advance by using the strategy of the "chip jumps" adapted to the Normand bocage.

    I don’t understand what this means. I copied, pasted, and googled and came up with a post from the old 2014 thread here on Tidefans. It was an August post so this strategy is coming back up later in the war.

    Normand bocage refers to the landscape. “Chip jumps” is what I don’t understand.

  13. #65
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Go Bama View Post
    The US forces advance by using the strategy of the "chip jumps" adapted to the Normand bocage.

    I don’t understand what this means. I copied, pasted, and googled and came up with a post from the old 2014 thread here on Tidefans. It was an August post so this strategy is coming back up later in the war.

    Normand bocage refers to the landscape. “Chip jumps” is what I don’t understand.
    I know the game of Damath involves chip jumps. I just don't know how you apply it on the ground...
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