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  1. #651
    Thread Starter

    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    September 19, 1944: Its Tuesday - today is D+105, marking 15 weeks since the D-Day Invasion at Normandy and the beginning of the liberation of Europe.

    As Operation Market Garden continues, resupply and reinforcement airdrops also continue to be hindered by bad weather. The bridge at Son is completed during the night and tanks from Guard Armored Division start moving a dawn. The armor, along with the British XXX Corps, advances 20 miles, making contact with the 82nd Airborne at Grave, just outside Nijmegen, where German resistance is fierce and the bridge is not yet secured. At Arnhem, British paratroopers from the 1st Airborne Division are forced to abandon attempts to break into the city. Serious resistance and heavy losses forces them to withdraw to Oosterbeek.

    Overnight, 78 German bombers take off and attack Eindhoven - the city center is destroyed, killing over 200 people in addition to hitting an ammunition convoy. Elements of the 101st, based in and around the city, escape loss. The 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment rushes into the burning city and rescues civilians throughout the night.

    Elements of Canadian 1st Army attack south of Scheldt estuary and US 1st Army attacks Muensterbusch, Weissenberg Hill, Stolberg, Zweifall, and Huertgen. To the south, US 3rd Army remains heavily engaged at Metz and Luneville and US 7th Army moves into jumping off positions for attack toward Epinal. French Army B holding positions around Belfort.

    Over northwestern Europe, US 9th Air Force supports ground troops up and down the front. RAF Bomber Command sends 646 aircraft to attack besieged fortress of Calais.

    The Belgian Parliament meets for the first time since May 1940.

    On the Eastern Front, the Soviet offensive in the Baltic continues. Forces of the 3rd Baltic Front capture Valga in Estonia.

    In Italy, the British 8th Army continues to attack and German units withdraw from Rimini Line overnight. US 5th Army is fighting around Monte Prano, Pescia, Firenzuola, and Futa pass.

    Pictured: The people of Eindhoven lined the streets of the town on September 19, 1944 to celebrate armored vehicles of British XXX Corps passing through - no one knew that the Germans would destroy much of the city later that evening; Eindhoven on September 20, 1944 - the morning after the German bombing; Four men of the 1st Paratroop Battalion, British 1st Airborne Division, take cover in a shell hole outside Arnhem, September 19, 1944.; Situation map from September 19, 1944

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    Oderint dum metuant - Lucius Accius

  2. #652
    BamaNation Hall of Fame Go Bama's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Tidewater View Post
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    On the map it is called the Pisa-Rimini Line, the Green Line, and the Gothic Line. Rimini is a city of the Adriatic coast.
    That is actually the same wiki map that was causing my confusion. The largest green box on the left says:

    Pisa-Rimini line
    Green line
    Gothic line

    Its unclear from that which is the green line or if they are the same. No big deal.

  3. #653
    Thread Starter

    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Go Bama View Post
    That is actually the same wiki map that was causing my confusion. The largest green box on the left says:

    Pisa-Rimini line
    Green line
    Gothic line

    It’s unclear from that which is the green line or if they are the same. No big deal.
    The Gothic Line was renamed the Green Line by the Allies in mid-1944. The Gothic Line was actually two lines about 12 miles apart and the Rimini Line was part of the secondary line. Rimini was considered the gateway into northern Italy, so it was heavily defended but also heavily attacked.

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    (Note Verde-1 and Verde-2 in the map above - 'verde' is Italian for 'green')
    Oderint dum metuant - Lucius Accius

  4. #654
    Senior Administrator TIDE-HSV's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    I've read on Dutch boards that the consensus of opinion on the Eindhoven raid was that 78 bombers was all the Germans had fuel for. This is getting a bit ahead, but it's an account of the last gasp massive fighter raid by the Germans on January 1, against Allied airfields and named "Bodenplatte"...

    History.net
    Last edited by TIDE-HSV; Yesterday at 10:55 AM. Reason: OOPS!
    "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity. - Ellen Parr"

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  5. #655
    Senior Administrator TIDE-HSV's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by crimsonaudio View Post
    September 19, 1944: It’s Tuesday - today is D+105, marking 15 weeks since the D-Day Invasion at Normandy and the beginning of the liberation of Europe.

    As Operation Market Garden continues, resupply and reinforcement airdrops also continue to be hindered by bad weather. The bridge at Son is completed during the night and tanks from Guard Armored Division start moving a dawn. The armor, along with the British XXX Corps, advances 20 miles, making contact with the 82nd Airborne at Grave, just outside Nijmegen, where German resistance is fierce and the bridge is not yet secured. At Arnhem, British paratroopers from the 1st Airborne Division are forced to abandon attempts to break into the city. Serious resistance and heavy losses forces them to withdraw to Oosterbeek.

    Overnight, 78 German bombers take off and attack Eindhoven - the city center is destroyed, killing over 200 people in addition to hitting an ammunition convoy. Elements of the 101st, based in and around the city, escape loss. The 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment rushes into the burning city and rescues civilians throughout the night.

    Elements of Canadian 1st Army attack south of Scheldt estuary and US 1st Army attacks Muensterbusch, Weissenberg Hill, Stolberg, Zweifall, and Huertgen. To the south, US 3rd Army remains heavily engaged at Metz and Luneville and US 7th Army moves into jumping off positions for attack toward Epinal. French Army B holding positions around Belfort.

    Over northwestern Europe, US 9th Air Force supports ground troops up and down the front. RAF Bomber Command sends 646 aircraft to attack besieged fortress of Calais.

    The Belgian Parliament meets for the first time since May 1940.

    On the Eastern Front, the Soviet offensive in the Baltic continues. Forces of the 3rd Baltic Front capture Valga in Estonia.

    In Italy, the British 8th Army continues to attack and German units withdraw from Rimini Line overnight. US 5th Army is fighting around Monte Prano, Pescia, Firenzuola, and Futa pass.

    Pictured: The people of Eindhoven lined the streets of the town on September 19, 1944 to celebrate armored vehicles of British XXX Corps passing through - no one knew that the Germans would destroy much of the city later that evening; Eindhoven on September 20, 1944 - the morning after the German bombing; Four men of the 1st Paratroop Battalion, British 1st Airborne Division, take cover in a shell hole outside Arnhem, September 19, 1944.; Situation map from September 19, 1944

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    Interesting! American-style helmets...
    "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity. - Ellen Parr"

    'If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?' - Steve Jobs

    I would rather live my life as if there is a god and die to find out there isn't, than live my life as if there isn't and die to find out there is. Albert Camus

    "When Fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross." - Sinclair Lewis

  6. #656
    BamaNation Hall of Fame Tidewater's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by TIDE-HSV View Post
    Interesting! American-style helmets...
    I think those are Helmets, Steel Airborne Troops.
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  7. #657
    Senior Administrator TIDE-HSV's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Tidewater View Post
    I think those are Helmets, Steel Airborne Troops.
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    The "Tommy" style helmets would almost be a parachute in themselves. I've read the rationale for them but I've forgotten it...
    "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity. - Ellen Parr"

    'If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?' - Steve Jobs

    I would rather live my life as if there is a god and die to find out there isn't, than live my life as if there isn't and die to find out there is. Albert Camus

    "When Fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross." - Sinclair Lewis

  8. #658
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by TIDE-HSV View Post
    The "Tommy" style helmets would almost be a parachute in themselves. I've read the rationale for them but I've forgotten it...
    I recall photos of the German Paratroopers landing in Crete having very similar helmets as well.

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    Last edited by UAH; Yesterday at 11:03 AM.

  9. #659
    BamaNation Hall of Fame Tidewater's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by TIDE-HSV View Post
    The "Tommy" style helmets would almost be a parachute in themselves. I've read the rationale for them but I've forgotten it...
    I think the Tommy helmets were stamped steel and thus cheap to make.

  10. #660
    Thread Starter

    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Tidewater View Post
    I think the Tommy helmets were stamped steel and thus cheap to make.
    And they were essentially copies of the Brodie helmet from WWI, which was designed for trench warfare and therefore had a wide brim to help block shrapnel from shells exploding above the troops in the trenches.
    Oderint dum metuant - Lucius Accius

  11. #661
    Thread Starter

    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    September 20, 1944: Day four of Operation Market Garden - fighting in Nijmegen is very heavy as British tankers and US paratroops from the 82nd fight house to house toward the bridge. A forced river crossing is launched and this finally secures the Waal River bridge. Attacks against the British battalion in Arnhem become heavy as the SS commits their armor to the battle. Casualties on both sides are heavy and ammunition for the paratroops is running low. While it was estimated that the 1st Airborne Division, 10,000 strong, would only need to hold the Arnhem bridge for two days, a mere 740 held it for twice as long against far heavier opposition than anticipated.

    German forces counterattack the in the Son area hitting the 101st Airborne with a tank heavy force, but intervention by the British tankers stops the German progression.

    Geldrop, Someren, and Terneuzen are captured by Allied troops, while elsewhere on the western front elements of Canadian 1st Army are attacking south of Scheldt estuary. US 1st Army attacks Muensterbusch, Weissenberg Hill, Stolberg, Zweifall, and Huertgen. US 3rd Army remains heavily engaged around Metz and Luneville and US 7th Army moves into jumping off positions for attack toward Epinal. French Army B holding positions around Belfort.

    In the skies above northwestern Europe, US 9th Air Force supports ground troops up and down the front and RAF Bomber Command sends 646 aircraft to attack besieged fortress of Calais.
    German units continue to withdraw from Rimini Line overnight. US 5th Army fights around Monte Prano, Pescia, Firenzuola, and Futa pass.

    Pictured: British troops of C Company, 5th Battalion, Border Regiment waiting in ditches near a road, observing German troops 100 yards away, Arnhem, Gelderland, the Netherlands, September 20, 1944.; A convoy of British trucks under German artillery and mortar fire on the road between Son and Eindhoven, September 20, 1944.; Captured British paratroopers being marched away by German troops, September 20, 1944; Sergeant J. Whawell and Sergeant J. Turrell of the UK Glider Pilot Regiment searching a damaged Dutch school for German snipers, Arnhem, Gelderland, the Netherlands, September 20, 1944.

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    Oderint dum metuant - Lucius Accius

  12. #662
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by crimsonaudio View Post
    September 20, 1944: Day four of Operation Market Garden - fighting in Nijmegen is very heavy as British tankers and US paratroops from the 82nd fight house to house toward the bridge. A forced river crossing is launched and this finally secures the Waal River bridge. Attacks against the British battalion in Arnhem become heavy as the SS commits their armor to the battle. Casualties on both sides are heavy and ammunition for the paratroops is running low. While it was estimated that the 1st Airborne Division, 10,000 strong, would only need to hold the Arnhem bridge for two days, a mere 740 held it for twice as long against far heavier opposition than anticipated.

    German forces counterattack the in the Son area hitting the 101st Airborne with a tank heavy force, but intervention by the British tankers stops the German progression.

    Geldrop, Someren, and Terneuzen are captured by Allied troops, while elsewhere on the western front elements of Canadian 1st Army are attacking south of Scheldt estuary. US 1st Army attacks Muensterbusch, Weissenberg Hill, Stolberg, Zweifall, and Huertgen. US 3rd Army remains heavily engaged around Metz and Luneville and US 7th Army moves into jumping off positions for attack toward Epinal. French Army B holding positions around Belfort.

    In the skies above northwestern Europe, US 9th Air Force supports ground troops up and down the front and RAF Bomber Command sends 646 aircraft to attack besieged fortress of Calais.
    German units continue to withdraw from Rimini Line overnight. US 5th Army fights around Monte Prano, Pescia, Firenzuola, and Futa pass.

    Pictured: British troops of C Company, 5th Battalion, Border Regiment waiting in ditches near a road, observing German troops 100 yards away, Arnhem, Gelderland, the Netherlands, September 20, 1944.; A convoy of British trucks under German artillery and mortar fire on the road between Son and Eindhoven, September 20, 1944.; Captured British paratroopers being marched away by German troops, September 20, 1944; Sergeant J. Whawell and Sergeant J. Turrell of the UK Glider Pilot Regiment searching a damaged Dutch school for German snipers, Arnhem, Gelderland, the Netherlands, September 20, 1944.

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    The crossing of the Waal River by the 82nd in canvas boats powered by paddles under intense German small arms fire is one of the most tremendous acts of desperation in the entire ETO during WWII. In my opinion if we were to sacrifice men in this fashion at anytime since the WWII and Korea War period the entire leadership of the military and government would be sacked. This is where I question Eisenhower and SHAEF leadership to place the very best of US Forces under Montgomery's command considering the historic precedent of incompetent British leadership throughout WWI.

    https://www.warhistoryonline.com/art...on-report.html
    Last edited by UAH; Today at 10:17 AM.

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