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  1. #66
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Chip jumps are what I call the maneuver when a team lays down suppression fire so the team behind them can proceed forward. Then the team in front lays down suppressive fire so the previous team can jump them. Like in checkers.

    In the bocage, the Germans had figured out how to use each small field as a trap - they could stall large numbers of troops with just four or five machine gun nests. While there were various methods uses by US forces to get through the bocage, the northern hedges weren't quite as tall, meaning tanks or large explosives weren't generally require to penetrate them - just an aggressive push by the troops.

    Sorry for the confusion on that.
    Oderint dum metuant - Lucius Accius

  2. #67
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    June 21, 1944: As the storm rages on in the English Channel and seems to increase in power, the Allied specialists think the weather will start to clear up the following day.

    In the Cotentin peninsula, the battle for Val-de-Saire begins. The American forces of the 7th Corps reach Cherbourg, which has been transformed into a stronghold by the Germans. Supported by the Allied navy, the soldiers of the 22nd Infantry Regiment move towards the downtown area and the deep water harbor. The harbor is blocked by a considerable number of remotely-controlled mines which can be operated from a German defense station located in the Fort of Rolls. The combat in the streets of the city is intense and, seeing the manpower of his troops decreasing rapidly, the commander in charge of the town of Cherbourg, Lieutenant-General Von Schlieben, orders the destruction of the harbor installations. In the South of the Cotentin, the 115th American Infantry regiment moves towards Saint-Lo, but the German opposition is very strong in the area of the Bretel Wood. Their orders are to hold the ground at all costs, which considerably stretches their defense lines.

    To the West, the British continue to progress slowly and with great difficulty, still awaiting the end of the storm to launch the Operation Epsom (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Epsom) planned by general Montgomery.

    Over France, RAF Bomber Command sends 322 aircraft to attack V-weapons sites during the day. RAF 2nd Tactical Air Force conducting ground support missions, offensive sorties, and defensive patrols over Normandy. US 8th Air Force attacks V-weapons sites with 70 bombers and US 9th Air Force attacks V-weapons sites with 250 bombers. US 9th Air Force fighters attack transportation lines and other targets.

    More than 1,300 US 8th Air Force bombers take off from airfields in Britain to attack Berlin, Lüne-Merseburg, and the hydrogenation plant at Ruhland in the Gau of Mark Brandenburg. The 163 that attack Ruhland go on to Ukraine instead of returning to Britain, and this is noticed by the German Luftwaffe, which has plans to counter such an attempt for a shuttle bombing operation. He 111 bombers from various units of KG 4 (pathfinders), KG 53, and KG 55 take off for Poltava and Mirgorod (Myrhorod) Airfields in Ukraine. RAF Bomber Command sends 133 aircraft to attack Wesseling overnight, 123 aircraft to attack Gelsenkirchen overnight, and 32 aircraft to attack Berlin overnight.

    In Italy, the British 8th Army advance reaches the German-held Albert Line at Chiusi, to the west of Trasimeno Lake. US 5th Army advances slowly against German delaying positions on Route 1 and along the Orcia River. US 12th Air Force attacks transportation lines, shipping at Livorno, and other targets.

    Pictured: Wrecked American and British landing craft after a storm, Omaha Beach, Normandy, June 21, 1944; American troops approaching Cherbourg; a B-26 Marauder with invasion stripes over Cherbourg; Situation map from June 21, 1944

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  3. #68
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by crimsonaudio View Post
    Chip jumps are what I call the maneuver when a team lays down suppression fire so the team behind them can proceed forward. Then the team in front lays down suppressive fire so the previous team can jump them. Like in checkers.

    In the bocage, the Germans had figured out how to use each small field as a trap - they could stall large numbers of troops with just four or five machine gun nests. While there were various methods uses by US forces to get through the bocage, the northern hedges weren't quite as tall, meaning tanks or large explosives weren't generally require to penetrate them - just an aggressive push by the troops.

    Sorry for the confusion on that.
    It probably isn't necessary to state this but hundreds of years of tilling these fields had built up several feet high mounds soil that was overgrown with trees and brush. The Americans soon learned that when a Sherman attempted to break through the hedge rows it would reveal its underside and immediately be killed by the Germans. The Shermans were quickly fitted with weldments that would enable them to plow through the mass of soil and underbrush without being incinerated by an anti-tank round. The Germans armed with the MG 42 with nearly double the rate of fire to allied Browning 30 cal. were formidable opponents from entrenched positions.

  4. #69
    BamaNation Hall of Fame Tidewater's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    The Longest Day: 75 Things You Don't Need to Know.

    Interesting. I had never heard that they filmed two versions, one in which everyone spoke English and one in whichGermans spoke German, Frenchmen spoke French, etc.

  5. #70
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    June 22, 1944: As expected, the weather has improved in the English Channel and in Normandy, and major repairs start in the artificial harbours of Arromanches and Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer. Bad news later reaches the Allied High command: the harbor of Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer has been irreparably damaged. The Allies decide to give up the use of the Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer harbor and order to the military engineers to focus on that of Arromanches. The capture of the artificial harbor of Cherbourg has become even more important for the Allies.

    American forces from the 22nd Infantry Regiment infiltrate Cherbourg via several places and street fighting in the city continues. Despite being cut off by the US forces, the Germans savagely resist the attacks. The Americans pause for a short period and bombard the city; 8th and 9th Air Force aircraft drop over 1,000 tons of bombs and Navy artillery just off the coast of Cherbourg pound the city.

    Near the Bretel Wood, North of Saint-Lo, the "punch" operations carried out by the 115th American Infantry regiment continue during the night, against the German defensive positions.

    North and northwest of Caen, the battle continues. The British and Canadian forces gather to launch Operation Epsom, intended to break the front line, once the supplies coming from the Arromanches harbor of can be rushed to the front.

    Above France, RAF Bomber Command sends 234 aircraft to attack V-weapons sites during the day. US 8th Air Force attacks V-weapons sites with 216 bombers in the morning and attacks V-weapons sites, airfields, transportation lines, and other targets with 718 bombers in the afternoon. US 9th Air Force attacks transportation lines and other targets with 600 bombers and 1,200 fighters, including strong support for ground assault against Cherbourg.

    In the east, one the third anniversary of the German invasion of the Soviet Union, Soviet forces launch Operation Bagration: a major offensive against German forces in Byelorussia, with 1.2 million men, 31,000 heavy guns, 5,200 tanks, and 6,000 aircraft. The plan is to smash through Warsaw, Poland and East Prussia, Germany to the Baltic coast; in doing so, they would trap German and Finnish forces in the north and isolate the German, Romanian, and Bulgarian armies in the south.

    In Italy, British 8th Army continues attacking the German delaying positions on the Trasimene line. US 5th Army continues to advance slowly against German delaying positions on Route 1 and along the Orcia River.. US 12th Air Force attacks transportation lines, bridges, supply dumps, and other targets and US 15th Air Force attacks Turin, Parma, Ferrara and other targets with 600 bombers and 250 fighters.

    Pictured: US artillery observers direct the shelling of enemy positions from the outskirts of the Cherbourg; A little French girl finds three admirers from the ranks of American forces who have made a speedy and successful advance through Normandy, France on June 22, 1944. From left to right, Private Robert D. Furra, Private Willie Johnson, and Private C.K. Jones; US Army Signal Corps photographer David Halberg of Cleveland, Ohio, holds a Thompson Submachine gun in Valognes before a sign with directions to Cherbourg (20 miles north) and Montebourg (5 miles south) on June 22, 1944; Map of the Soviet’s Operation Bagration - a massive ground campaign which dwarfed D-Day in scale.

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  6. #71
    BamaNation Hall of Fame Tidewater's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    In Operation BAGRATION, the Red Army offensive depicted, Stalin told the Wehrmacht's Army Group Center to turn around and bend over, the Red Army kicked their backsides like it had never been kicked. If memory serves, 41 of AG Center's 44 divisions were destroyed in six weeks (aided substantially by Hitler's frequent "no retreat/die in place" orders).
    Holy Cow, what a slaughter.

  7. #72
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Tidewater View Post
    In Operation BAGRATION, the Red Army offensive depicted, Stalin told the Wehrmacht's Army Group Center to turn around and bend over, the Red Army kicked their backsides like it had never been kicked. If memory serves, 41 of AG Center's 44 divisions were destroyed in six weeks (aided substantially by Hitler's frequent "no retreat/die in place" orders).
    Holy Cow, what a slaughter.
    I thought it was 28 out of 34, but either way - it was the worst (largest) defeat in German military history. They just hammered 'em.

    According to the Soviets, here were the numbers:
    Germans:
    1,036,760 personnel
    800 tanks
    530 assault guns
    10,090 guns
    1,000–1,300 aircraft

    Soviets:
    2,500,000 personnel
    6,000 tanks and assault guns
    45,000 guns, rocket launchers and mortars
    8,000 aircraft

    It was an incredible mismatch.
    Last edited by crimsonaudio; June 22nd, 2019 at 01:29 PM.
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  8. #73
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    It's interesting to see some of those plates they cobbled on to the bottom/front of the tanks...
    "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity. - Ellen Parr"

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  9. #74
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Tidewater View Post
    In Operation BAGRATION, the Red Army offensive depicted, Stalin told the Wehrmacht's Army Group Center to turn around and bend over, the Red Army kicked their backsides like it had never been kicked. If memory serves, 41 of AG Center's 44 divisions were destroyed in six weeks (aided substantially by Hitler's frequent "no retreat/die in place" orders).
    Holy Cow, what a slaughter.
    Which showed why he never advanced past corporal...
    "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity. - Ellen Parr"

    'If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?' - Steve Jobs

    “I would rather live my life as if there is a god and die to find out there isn't, than live my life as if there isn't and die to find out there is.” Albert Camus

    "When Fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross." - Sinclair Lewis

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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by TIDE-HSV View Post
    It's interesting to see some of those plates they cobbled on to the bottom/front of the tanks...
    My Dad commented on welding the "plows" on the Sherman's when his unit moved inland from Utah Beach. At night he watched the V1's overhead on their flight to England. In the early days they experienced some fairly serious strafing from the Luftwaffe at night even with the complete air superiority the Allies held during daylight hours.

  11. #76
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by crimsonaudio View Post
    I thought it was 28 out of 34, but either way - it was the worst (largest) defeat in German military history. They just hammered 'em.

    According to the Soviets, here were the numbers:
    Germans:
    1,036,760 personnel
    800 tanks
    530 assault guns
    10,090 guns
    1,000–1,300 aircraft

    Soviets:
    2,500,000 personnel
    6,000 tanks and assault guns
    45,000 guns, rocket launchers and mortars
    8,000 aircraft

    It was an incredible mismatch.
    You were right. I just checked Paul Adair's Hitler's Greatest Defeat: The Collapse of Army Group Centre, June 1944 (London: Brockhampton Press, 1998), p. 171. Adair says the Germans lost "about 30" divisions. John Erickson, The Road to Stalingrad, The Road to Berlin, (London: Weidenfeld and Nicholson), p. 228, places German losses at "between 25 and 28 divisions."

    As you know (others may not), the Germans had the annoying habit of taking half of this division, one third of that, plus a mess kit repair battalion, calling it a kampfgruppe and sending it into the fight. This practice makes counting unit losses a bit complicated.

  12. #77
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by crimsonaudio View Post
    I thought it was 28 out of 34, but either way - it was the worst (largest) defeat in German military history. They just hammered 'em.

    According to the Soviets, here were the numbers:
    Germans:
    1,036,760 personnel
    800 tanks
    530 assault guns
    10,090 guns
    1,000–1,300 aircraft

    Soviets:
    2,500,000 personnel
    6,000 tanks and assault guns
    45,000 guns, rocket launchers and mortars
    8,000 aircraft

    It was an incredible mismatch.
    Seeing how Operation Citadel and the Battle of Kursk went the year before, its surprising that Germany had 800 tanks left to fight the Soviets.
    "Aut viam inveniam aut faciam."

    Hannibal

  13. #78
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    June 23, 1944: The American forces of the VII Corps drive the Germans from their first line of defense in Cherbourg. Yesterday’s bombardments created lots damage and confusion in the German lines and General Collins keeps the VII Corps pushing forward, constantly attacking.

    General Montgomery, who planned the Operation Epsom, lands in France and sets up his headquarters in the village of Blay, west of Bayeux. He prepares the beginning of Epsom, which should start on June 25, assuming the supply and the reinforcements of men and vehicles are not delayed. The 5th British Infantry division, which was essentially stalled by the Germans until June 18, continues to progress very slowly (capturing St. Honorina, northwest of Caen), delayed by the preparations of Epsom.

    Over France, with two engines out and the fuselage on fire, Pilot Officer Andrew Mynarski, a Canadian gunner in a No. 419 Squadron Lancaster, is ordered to bale out. However, he sees that the rear gunner is trapped and tries to free him even though his own clothing and parachute are on fire. Hopelessly stuck, the rear gunner signals to Mynarski that he should save himself. The Canadian gallantly stands to attention and salutes his comrade before jumping out. He is found by the French but dies later of his terrible injuries. Amazingly, the gunner is thrown clear when the Lancaster crashed and survives, as did the other crew members who had jumped. When they return and tell their story after the war, Mynarski is posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.

    Also over France, US 8th Air Force attacks V-weapons sites with 211 bombers escorted by 161 fighters and attacks airfields and transportation lines with 196 bombers escorted by 226 fighters. US 9th Air Force attacks V-weapons sites, transportation lines, and other targets with 175 bombers and 630 fighters. RAF Bomber Command sends 412 aircraft to attack V-weapons sites and 203 aircraft to attack transportation lines - both overnight.

    The German high command works hard to defend its positions in Normandy, as it believes in its revolutionary weapons such as the V-1 rockets. Many of these rockets are sent day and night - generally aimed at civilian targets in England.

    On the eastern front, the Soviet attack begins. There are four front-level commands engaged in the operation, under the STAVKA direction of Marshal Zhukov (the southern wing) and Marshal Vasilevsky (the northern wing). From left to right: 1st Belorussian Front (Rokossovsky); 2nd Belorussian Front (Zakharov); 3rd Belorussian Front (Cherniakhovsky); and, 1st Baltic Front (Bagramian). The Soviet combat forces directly engaged in the offensive amount to over 1,250,000 men (in 124 divisions), over 4000 tanks and self-propelled guns, over 24,000 artillery pieces and over 6300 aircraft. Soviet objectives include tactical encirclements at Vitebsk and Bobruisk while a deep encirclement would aim for Minsk. Soviet forces are then to drive west toward the Vistula River. The target of Operation Bagration is German Army Group Center (Busch) holding a salient centered on Minsk, and including most of Belorussia. Its forces, from right to left, include: 9th Army (Jordan), 4th Army (Tippelskirch); and, 3rd Panzer Army (Reinhardt). On the right flank of the army group is the German 2nd Army (Weiss) which is not targeted by the Soviet offensive. The German defenders amount to 800,000 men in 63 divisions with about 900 tanks and assault guns, 10,000 artillery pieces and 1,300 planes. Advances of up 11 miles are recorded by Red Army troops of 2nd, 3rd Belorussian and 1st Baltic Fronts. The 1st Belorussian Front does not join in the assault during the day. Meanwhile in the far north, forces of the Soviet 7th Separate Army cross the Svir River.

    In Italy, British 8th Army attacks around Chiusi and Monte San Croce. US 5th Army continues to advance slowly against German delaying positions on Route 1 and along the Orcia River. General Robert Frederick departs 1st Special Services Force to take command of 1st Airborne Task Force for invasion of southern France.

    Churchill, with misgivings, gives in to pressure from the Americans and sanctions operation Anvil (the proposed US-French invasion of the south of France). Churchill calls this a “bleak and sterile exercise".

    Pictured: Two French civilian refugees from the battle that raged in St. Sauveur as American troops advanced on Cherbourg on June 23, 1944, unload their cart after returning to their house (in background, with most shingles gone). 101 Airborne Division ceremony in Carentan, June 23, 1944; Canadians battle for Caen - former battalion headquarters of the Regina Rifles after it had been raked by German shell, Bretteville, June 23, 1944; P-47 Thunderbolt piloted by Capt Raymond M Walsh of the 406th Fighter Group is silhouetted against the exploding ammunition truck he just strafed, France, June 23, 1944. The image was taken by his wingman’s gun camera in the following P-47

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