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  1. #105
    BamaNation Hall of Fame Tidewater's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by crimsonaudio View Post
    US troops are watching a column of German POWs near the French city of Avranches, June 30, 1944;
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    I do not think the Allies were particularly close to Avranches on 30 June. The American 4th AD got there on 30 July.

    It's not like I am in the habit of memorizing obscure French villages, but Avranches is the lynchpin holding the Normandy peninsula to the Brittany peninsula. The western coastline of Normandy runs north-south until near Avranches, then it turn due west and becomes the northern coastline of Brittany. In other words, once the Germans fall back south of Avranches, the amount of front line they have to cover goes up exponentially. The Jerries were screwed.
    I just checked the Green book (Breakout and Pursuit) and on July 2, the Americans had not yet taken St. Lo, which is well north of Avranches.
    Last edited by Tidewater; June 30th, 2019 at 02:18 PM.

  2. #106
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    July 1, 1944: Operation Epsom, which was completed on June 30, did not tip the scales for either side engaged in the Battle on Odon, but the Germans in Caen lost a part of their defenses in north, which were sent to fight against the British forces in the west of the city. General Montgomery tries to make up for the failure of Epsom by launching a vast offensive on the north side of Caen. The German defenders wilt under intense bombardments of the British artillery and air force, and are forced back little by little, while the English advanced elements approach the suburbs of the city. The Germans of the 1st Panzer SS try their turn with an offensive directed to the north of Caen (towards Tilly-sur-Seulles) which fails because of the staunch resistance by the British troops belonging to the 2nd Army, which creates an artillery barrage in front of its position.

    In the Cotentin, the Americans attack in the south towards Saint-Lo, a principal objective of the US troops. These ‘punch’ attacks around the Wood of Bretel to the north of Saint-Lo (led by the 115th American Infantry Regiment) against the German defensive positions are continual, and violent battles (of tanks in particular) are common in this area.

    Over France, RAF 2nd Tactical Air Force conducting ground support missions, offensive sorties, and defensive patrols over Normandy. RAF Bomber Command sends 328 aircraft to attack V-weapons sites during the day.

    On the eastern front, forces of the 3rd Belorussian Front complete the capture of Borisov. Forces opposite the British 8th Army begin to withdraw.

    In Italy, US 5th Army captures Cecina and pushes toward Siena and US 12th Air Force aircraft attack bridges, transportation lines, airfields, supply depots, and other targets. Four Kriegsmarine gun ferries sunk at La Spezia by Allied aircraft.

    Pictured: A group of very young soldiers of the 12th Panzer Division “Hitlerjugend” Waffen SS prisoners in Normandy in July 1, 1944; Nazi flag held by American soldiers after the liberation of Cherbourg, July 1, 1944; American M10 Wolverine tank destroyer firing near Saint-L, France, July 1, 1944; View looking west on Normandy's Omaha Beach during resupply operations, July 1, 1944

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    Oderint dum metuant - Lucius Accius

  3. #107
    BamaNation Hall of Fame Go Bama's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    I’m haven’t been able to find anything on where the V weapons sites are. I had always assumed they were fired from within Germany but earlier someone in this thread stated that their father could see them flying toward Britain. As often as missions were flown against these sites it seems like they would have been reduced to rubble.

    Does anyone have information about where these V weapons sites were?

  4. #108
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Go Bama View Post
    I’m haven’t been able to find anything on where the V weapons sites are. I had always assumed they were fired from within Germany but earlier someone in this thread stated that their father could see them flying toward Britain. As often as missions were flown against these sites it seems like they would have been reduced to rubble.

    Does anyone have information about where these V weapons sites were?
    Mobile launches were the delivery method of choice: http://www.v2rocket.com/start/deploy...perations.html

    Difficult to find. Also note that the V2 had a max range of around 235 miles.
    Oderint dum metuant - Lucius Accius

  5. #109
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by crimsonaudio View Post
    Mobile launches were the delivery method of choice: http://www.v2rocket.com/start/deploy...perations.html

    Difficult to find. Also note that the V2 had a max range of around 235 miles.
    Awesome information! It seems the best way to stop the V2 would have been to destroy the rails used to transport them.

  6. #110
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Go Bama View Post
    Awesome information! It seems the best way to stop the V2 would have been to destroy the rails used to transport them.
    A lot of that was done, and not just for V2s. It was done to disrupt transport generally. However, until they started running out of steel, the Germans were very good in replacing tracks overnight...
    "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity. - Ellen Parr"

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  7. #111
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by crimsonaudio View Post
    July 1, 1944: Operation Epsom, which was completed on June 30, did not tip the scales for either side engaged in the Battle on Odon, but the Germans in Caen lost a part of their defenses in north, which were sent to fight against the British forces in the west of the city. General Montgomery tries to make up for the failure of Epsom by launching a vast offensive on the north side of Caen. The German defenders wilt under intense bombardments of the British artillery and air force, and are forced back little by little, while the English advanced elements approach the suburbs of the city. The Germans of the 1st Panzer SS try their turn with an offensive directed to the north of Caen (towards Tilly-sur-Seulles) which fails because of the staunch resistance by the British troops belonging to the 2nd Army, which creates an artillery barrage in front of its position.

    In the Cotentin, the Americans attack in the south towards Saint-Lo, a principal objective of the US troops. These ‘punch’ attacks around the Wood of Bretel to the north of Saint-Lo (led by the 115th American Infantry Regiment) against the German defensive positions are continual, and violent battles (of tanks in particular) are common in this area.

    Over France, RAF 2nd Tactical Air Force conducting ground support missions, offensive sorties, and defensive patrols over Normandy. RAF Bomber Command sends 328 aircraft to attack V-weapons sites during the day.

    On the eastern front, forces of the 3rd Belorussian Front complete the capture of Borisov. Forces opposite the British 8th Army begin to withdraw.

    In Italy, US 5th Army captures Cecina and pushes toward Siena and US 12th Air Force aircraft attack bridges, transportation lines, airfields, supply depots, and other targets. Four Kriegsmarine gun ferries sunk at La Spezia by Allied aircraft.

    Pictured: A group of very young soldiers of the 12th Panzer Division “Hitlerjugend” Waffen SS prisoners in Normandy in July 1, 1944; Nazi flag held by American soldiers after the liberation of Cherbourg, July 1, 1944; American M10 Wolverine tank destroyer firing near Saint-L, France, July 1, 1944; View looking west on Normandy's Omaha Beach during resupply operations, July 1, 1944

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    Of this bunch of POWs, I'd say they did have typical German faces. The guy on the far left does look more Italian, but my SIL, born near Baden-Baden also looks Italian...
    "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity. - Ellen Parr"

    'If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?' - Steve Jobs

    I would rather live my life as if there is a god and die to find out there isn't, than live my life as if there isn't and die to find out there is. Albert Camus

    "When Fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross." - Sinclair Lewis

  8. #112
    BamaNation Hall of Fame Tidewater's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by crimsonaudio View Post
    Pictured: A group of very young soldiers of the 12th Panzer Division “Hitlerjugend” Waffen SS prisoners in Normandy in July 1, 1944;

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    I wonder how much deprogramming those kids needed.

  9. #113
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Tidewater View Post
    I wonder how much deprogramming those kids needed.
    Can you imagine? SMH
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  10. #114
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    I was watching the film The Battle of Britain last weekend.
    The producers had a fleet of He-111s (32 planes in fact) and 27 x Bf-109s. So I was curious where the heck they got such a large fleet of Luftwaffe planes. Turns out they went to the Spanish Air Force, which produced both under license from the Germans and the Spanish still had the aircraft in the inventory in the late 1960s.
    Also interesting was that German fighter ace Adolf Galland was a technical adviser to the film. At one point the actor playing General Albert Kesselring saluted with the Nazi salute and Galland went ballistic, saying Kesselring would not have saluted in such a way. Galland was so furious that he had to be escorted off the set. I don't know Kesselring's politics (I just know he was an effective commander in Italy), but I do know that the Luftwaffe tended to be less nazified than the army.

  11. #115
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    July 2, 1944: The area in the west of Caen liberated by the Scots between June 25th and 30th is now filled with violent battles between the British troops and the German Panzer Lehr. Rommel, coming back in Normandy after his return to Germany on Hitler’s orders, realizes that if they could cut the Allied beachhead in two parts, one American and one Canadian, the Allies will be greatly weakened. He launches an offensive towards Bayeux and must continue north of the city to join Arromanches. But the Canadians hold fast and stop the German forces. Rommel’s forces suffer tremendous losses in this battle.

    On the American front, the US soldiers and vehicles in the Cotentin peninsula continue to move towards Saint-Lo, which is bombarded once again by the allied air forces and artillery. The engagements press southward and the Americans add reserve troops in order to launch an offensive in the direction of Saint-Lo. US 1st Army reorganizes the front line with V Corps, XIX Corps, VII Corps, and VIII Corps.

    Over France, RAF Bomber Command sends 384 aircraft to attack V-weapons sites during the day. US 8th Air Force attacks V-weapons sites with 280 bombers of which one lost. US 9th Air Force bombers grounded by unfavorable weather conditions while fighters conduct ground support missions, offensive sorties, and defensive patrols over Normandy.

    The German HQ panics and realizes the impossibility of a decisive victory, because of their massive losses of both men and equipment, and Marshal von Rundstedt asks his superiors for authorization to retreat. Hitler, finding his request ridiculous, refuses and dismisses his marshal. He is replaced on July 2nd by Marshal von Kluge.

    On the eastern front, Soviet forces cut several rail lines leading west from Minsk - Soviet 3rd Belorussian Front and 1st Belorussian Front continue pushing toward Minsk to encircle German 4th Army. Hitler belatedly agrees to the civilian evacuation of Minsk.

    In Italy, British 8th Army captures Foiano and US 5th Army attacks Casole d'Elsa and moves toward Siena. 12th Air Force aircraft attack bridges, transportation lines, airfields, supply depots, and other targets.

    Pictured: British army troops load a shell into a 5.5-inch gun, July 2, 1944.; Eisenhower and Bradley at the 2nd US PC ID to the castle of La Boulaye, July 2, 1944; American GIs pose atop a captured monster German railway gun, July 2, 1944; US 8th and 15th Air Forces (and Bomber Command of the Royal Air Force) support ground operations, July, 2 1944

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  12. #116
    Senior Administrator TIDE-HSV's Avatar
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    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    Interesting that Hitler sacked aggressive commanders and ended up with Walter Model, master of defense, just as he ended up having to rehabilitate and hire back Heinrici for the final defense of Berlin...
    "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity. - Ellen Parr"

    'If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?' - Steve Jobs

    I would rather live my life as if there is a god and die to find out there isn't, than live my life as if there isn't and die to find out there is. Albert Camus

    "When Fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross." - Sinclair Lewis

  13. #117
    Thread Starter

    Re: 75th anniversary of D-Day...

    July 3, 1944: On the British front to the west and north of Caen, the Brits, Canadians and Scottish make progress. Advanced elements of the 2nd British Army are fighting in the streets of the suburbs of Caen where they face furious resistance from the German defenders, who refuse to retreat or surrender. This strategy by Hitler - which dictates that the German soldiers must defend each foot of their territory up to and including the ‘supreme sacrifice’ - forces the British to use heavy weapons in order to progress, and the air forces and both naval and terrestrial artillery focus on the capital of Normandy.

    In the South of the Cotentin, the American forces of the 1st Army launch an offensive against Saint-Lo which runs into a wall of German defenders who are firmly dug in behind their defense line and who benefit from the natural barriers of the Normand bocage (hedgerows). These hedgerows are so thick that engineers first have to blow a hole in the bank, then a bulldozer will later and widen the hole - this slows progress dramatically.

    Over France, US 9th Air Force attacks ground targets with 275 fighters in support of 1st Army offensive. RAF 2nd Tactical Air Force conducts ground support missions, offensive sorties, and defensive patrols over Normandy at reduced intensity due to poor weather conditions.

    On the eastern front, Soviet forces of the 1st and 3rd Belorussian Fronts complete the capture of Minsk. German forces of the 4th Army, which has been pinned by 2nd Belorussian Front, are now trapped east of the city. German casualties and equipment losses are severe. Most of the forces of German Army Group Center are in disarray.

    In Italy, British 8th Army captures Cortona and US 5th Army captures Siena. US 12th Air Force aircraft attack bridges, transportation lines, airfields, supply depots, and other targets including Pietrasanta, Canneto sull'Oglio, Saviano, and Pontelagoscuro.

    Pictured: The Allies find themselves in the "battle of the hedgerows", as they are stymied by the agricultural hedges in Western France which intelligence had not properly evaluated, July 3, 1944; A Culin hedgerow cutter - the invention of this hedge-breaching device is generally credited to Curtis G. Culin, a sergeant in the 2nd Armored Division's 102nd Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron. However, military historian Max Hastings notes that Culin was inspired by "a Tennessee hillbilly named Roberts", who during a discussion about how to overcome the bocage, said "Why don't we get some saw teeth and put them on the front of the tank and cut through these hedges?”; Soviet tank personnel enter the destroyed Minsk, July 3, 1944 (this date is observed in Belarus as Independence Day); Free French Moroccan infantry in Siena, Italy on July 3, 1944.

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