2020 Prospect: 5* RB & #1 Player Zachary Evans

NoNC4Tubs

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He's been in the Slot in every game he's played in at UGA. Putting him in the Slot doesn't mean that he wouldn't carry the ball. In the past we've lined him up at WR and motioned him into Jet Sweeps.

FWIW, I'm old school and the last thing I want is a locker room cancer. The only reason why I'm in favor of taking ZE is on the ground information I've received all season. My contact assures me the reports of Zach's behavioral issues have been wildly exaggerated. Is he perfect? No. However, the real problem is the relationship between Zach and one of the Assistant Coaches, who supposedly is a real piece of work.
Unless your contact works at the school (in Texas) and knows all of the parties involved, your contact is just some dude behind a keyboard in central jawja doing some spinning... :rolleyes:

EDIT: My contact says your contact is an idiot... :cool:
 
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gymcoach

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Dec 6, 2006
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I work with kids every day his age and there isn’t one single kid no matter how talented they are, and yes you do favor the more talented kids you work with by human nature, I don’t not care for as a coach. With that being said there are instances where a kid chooses to continue to do or act inappropriately to cause your feelings toward them to not be favorable. I never just not liked a kid because... Evans obviously did things that caused a coach or coaches to not care for him and his actions. Him being suspended for the playoffs is like a slap in the face for his teammates, one of which is committed and will sign with Bama if he gets his grades in order. Do you think his teammate would still be committed to us and willing to sign after we stopped recruiting him, if these stories were not true? To me it actually reiterates the fact there are issues with Evans.
 

Con

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I work with kids every day his age and there isn’t one single kid no matter how talented they are, and yes you do favor the more talented kids you work with by human nature, I don’t not care for as a coach. With that being said there are instances where a kid chooses to continue to do or act inappropriately to cause your feelings toward them to not be favorable. I never just not liked a kid because... Evans obviously did things that caused a coach or coaches to not care for him and his actions. Him being suspended for the playoffs is like a slap in the face for his teammates, one of which is committed and will sign with Bama if he gets his grades in order. Do you think his teammate would still be committed to us and willing to sign after we stopped recruiting him, if these stories were not true? To me it actually reiterates the fact there are issues with Evans.
Very well said @gymcoach
 

bamaga

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I see predictions for The landing spot for ZE is all over the map , literally . Except, could he be the first from HS to the XFL? I mean the rumor is he has an admissions problem. The XFL seems to be a perfect spot instead of possibly the JUCO route. play 3 years in that league , make some bank then enter the NFL draft,
 

bamaga

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Straight from an article on 247 that dropped a few hours ago-
Evans’ top five featured Alabama, Georgia, LSU, Ohio State and Oklahoma.

The oddest part of that list? Ohio State and Oklahoma weren’t really recruiting Evans at that time. That’s just a window into the eventual madness.
. He’s had documented off-field issues at North Shore High School – he was suspended for the state championship game – and has vexed college staffs to the point where some schools have taken him off their board.
.
Evans Visits Alabama – June 3, 2019

Alabama looked like the likely destination for Evans. His high school teammate and good friend, Damieon George, was committed to the Tide. They’d talked about each other as a “package deal” throughout their recruitments.
This would be the peak of the Evans-to-Bama momentum. Alabama eventually backed off Evans.
247 ARTICLE


The sad part, I don’t think ZE will be the last of his kind. The hoopla and attention of today’s recruiting is creating this. Hopefully Evans can be de recruited and his life can get back on track.
 
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4Q Basket Case

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Straight from an article on 247 that dropped a few hours ago-





247 ARTICLE


The sad part, I don’t think ZE will be the last of his kind. The hoopla and attention of today’s recruiting is creating this. Hopefully Evans can be de recruited and his life can get back on track.
At 18, with essentially no life experience to tell him otherwise, that’s a tall order.

One of my most respected mentors was an award-winning elementary school teacher. She said that, for good or ill, a parent’s job was largely done by the time the child was 6 years old, and it’s well on about impossible to change the life track of a 12-year-old.

Her position was that the few redemptions past that age were a function of the child him/herself. She said they were the few hard-wired exceptions, and it really wouldn’t have mattered who the parents were or what they did.

For the vast majority, outsiders, defined as someone other than the kid, had little to no permanent influence after age 12. IF the child got on track, it was a personal choice born of observing what happened to others when they made the wrong choices, and it is an exceedingly rare human being who can make those distinctions at that age

Point being that (1) parents need to be fully engaged as to age-appropriate consequences before the child has the ability to be so, and (2) at age 18, heretofore insulated from consequences for his actions, Zach Evans is who he is, and only he can change himself.

No coach, not even Nick Saban or Paul Bryant can / could change him from the outside.

At this point, his options are slim (himself), and none (other people).

For his sake and that of the people he has the potential to hurt, I hope he gets his act together. But the numbers are against him, and I don’t expect it.
 
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Tideflyer

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At 18, with essentially no life experience to tell him otherwise, that’s a tall order.

One of my most respected mentors was an award-winning elementary school teacher. She said that, for good or ill, a parent’s job was largely done by the time the child was 6 years old, and it’s well on about impossible to change the life track of a 12-year-old.

Her position was that the few redemptions past that age were a function of the child him/herself. She said they were the few hard-wired exceptions, and it really wouldn’t have mattered who the parents were or what they did.

For the vast majority, outsiders, defined as someone other than the kid, had little to no permanent influence after age 12. IF the child got on track, it was a personal choice born of observing what happened to others when they made the wrong choices, and it is an exceedingly rare human being who can make those distinctions at that age

Point being that (1) parents need to be fully engaged as to age-appropriate consequences before the child has the ability to be so, and (2) at age 18, heretofore insulated from consequences for his actions, Zach Evans is who he is, and only he can change himself.

No coach, not even Nick Saban or Paul Bryant can / could change him from the outside.

At this point, his options are slim (himself), and none (other people).

For his sake and that of the people he has the potential to hurt, I hope he gets his act together. But the numbers are against him, and I don’t expect it.
Fully and wholeheartedly agree. See it every...single....day in the work place. Summed up with, " He/she just wasn`t raised right."
 
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Padreruf

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At 18, with essentially no life experience to tell him otherwise, that’s a tall order.

One of my most respected mentors was an award-winning elementary school teacher. She said that, for good or ill, a parent’s job was largely done by the time the child was 6 years old, and it’s well on about impossible to change the life track of a 12-year-old.

Her position was that the few redemptions past that age were a function of the child him/herself. She said they were the few hard-wired exceptions, and it really wouldn’t have mattered who the parents were or what they did.

For the vast majority, outsiders, defined as someone other than the kid, had little to no permanent influence after age 12. IF the child got on track, it was a personal choice born of observing what happened to others when they made the wrong choices, and it is an exceedingly rare human being who can make those distinctions at that age

Point being that (1) parents need to be fully engaged as to age-appropriate consequences before the child has the ability to be so, and (2) at age 18, heretofore insulated from consequences for his actions, Zach Evans is who he is, and only he can change himself.

No coach, not even Nick Saban or Paul Bryant can / could change him from the outside.

At this point, his options are slim (himself), and none (other people).

For his sake and that of the people he has the potential to hurt, I hope he gets his act together. But the numbers are against him, and I don’t expect it.
Agreed...but adults -- young and old -- can observe people and make decisions to go in a different direction with their lives. I did -- in religion we call it repentance...not remorse, but turning around 180 degrees and living in an opposite way (positively, I mean.) However, I had to make that decision...no one else could do that for me.
Unfortunately, with so many absentee or weak parents, many do not have the ethical/character background that enables them to make this decision.
 

4Q Basket Case

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Agreed...but adults -- young and old -- can observe people and make decisions to go in a different direction with their lives. I did -- in religion we call it repentance...not remorse, but turning around 180 degrees and living in an opposite way (positively, I mean.) However, I had to make that decision...no one else could do that for me.
Unfortunately, with so many absentee or weak parents, many do not have the ethical/character background that enables them to make this decision.
Sounds like you were raised right, but fell off track somewhere along the way. Then got tired of dealing with the fallout, both internal and external, of the direction you were going. So you decided to live life the way you knew was right all along.

I did something similar — wasted three years of undergraduate college. If math hadn’t come easier for me than it did for most of my classmates, I wouldn’t have graduated. Lived on partial credit and the grade curve. Then, after working a job from which I knew the possibilities for advancement were limited, I went back to graduate school and did it right.

The irony is that when I was living wrong, doing what others characterized as “having fun,” it was really anything but. There was a lot of guilt. Then, when I started doing what I knew I should have been doing all along, it was both more productive and more fun. Still had my share of nights out with buddies, but there was balance, and no longer any guilt.

My mother says everybody climbs Fool’s Hill at some point in life, and it sounds like we’ve both seen that peak.
 

Padreruf

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Sounds like you were raised right, but fell off track somewhere along the way. Then got tired of dealing with the fallout, both internal and external, of the direction you were going. So you decided to live life the way you knew was right all along.

I did something similar — wasted three years of undergraduate college. If math hadn’t come easier for me than it did for most of my classmates, I wouldn’t have graduated. Lived on partial credit and the grade curve. Then, after working a job from which I knew the possibilities for advancement were limited, I went back to graduate school and did it right.

The irony is that when I was living wrong, doing what others characterized as “having fun,” it was really anything but. There was a lot of guilt. Then, when I started doing what I knew I should have been doing all along, it was both more productive and more fun. Still had my share of nights out with buddies, but there was balance, and no longer any guilt.

My mother says everybody climbs Fool’s Hill at some point in life, and it sounds like we’ve both seen that peak.
I could have written that...only school was so easy for me that I could sleep my way through...We all have to grow up sometime...lots of twists and turns...wouldn't take nothing for the journey now.
 

Keeter

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I could have written that...only school was so easy for me that I could sleep my way through...We all have to grow up sometime...lots of twists and turns...wouldn't take nothing for the journey now.
A teacher once told a class I was in to remember when we felt like complaining that “ the strongest steel is forged by the fires of hell”........all adversity we faced would either break us or shape us.......and he was correct
 
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