75th anniversary of D-Day...

crimsonaudio

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November 20, 1944: At 4th Infantry Division, two days have passed since 22nd Infantry Regiment crossed a small section of Road W. A battalion of the 8th Infantry has penetrated more than a mile past Road W and stands no more than a thousand yards from high ground in the vicinity of Gut Schwarzenbroich, the regiment's first objective. Yet the penetration is so slim that it cannot be exploited without a broader base of support. Despite small advances, a short stretch of Road W between the 8th and 22d Infantry Regiments still remains under German control.

For all the American supply problems, it was obvious from the relative ease with which the 8th Infantry and 22d Infantry had advanced that the enemy's overextended 275th Division was incapable of stopping the advance. For days, German commanders have been engaged in a frantic search for troops to back up the 275th Division. They have already used what was left of the 116th Panzer Division, but that is not enough. Soon, however, the volks grenadier division arrives in the Seventh Army's southernmost corps and begins to relieve the 353d Infantry Division. Though the 344th and 353d Divisions "had little combat value in the unusually bitter fighting of the Huertgen Forest," the Germans rushed first the 344th, then the 353d, to the forest.

When both American regiments renew their attacks to the east and northeast on 20 November, the effect of the German reinforcements is immediately apparent. Colonel McKee's 8th Infantry clears additional ground to the southeast in the direction of the interregimental boundary, but in the main effort toward Gut Schwarzenbroich, neither of two attacking battalions can gain anything. As night falls, the opposing forces are so close that enemy fire prevents the men from cutting logs for overhead cover on their foxholes - failure to do so in the forest was an invitation to death.

By nightfall the terrible price the 4th Division's two regiments had paid in the five-day attack that has yielded only 1.5 miles of penetration is apparent - some rifle companies are down below fifty effective soldiers, several have only one or two officers left. The hardest hit unit of either regiment was the south-wing battalion of the 22d Infantry, which has had to attack and defend the regiment's open southern flank. That battalion has been reduced to the size of a company. For the two regiments the toll in battle casualties alone is about 1,500, and several hundred more men had been evacuated with respiratory diseases, trench foot, and combat exhaustion. Although replacements begin to become a daily addition to the front lines, they never replenish the number of fallen men, and days and weeks will pass before they might approach the fallen in experience. The 4th Division is eventually so badly affected by casualties it has to be pulled from the front lines to recover and rebuild.

Nearby, US 9th Army captures Gereonsweiler, Ederen, Freialdenhoven, Niedermerz, and Aldenhoven and US 1st Army remains heavily engaged in Hürtgen Forest. German forces resist US 19th Corps attacks near Julich. Elements of US 3rd Army continue the siege of Metz as other elements capture Dieuze to the east and prepare to attack across the Sarre. US 7th Army crosses the Sarre and the Meurthe and pushes toward Saverne Gap. The French 1st Army is fighting in Belfort, reaches outskirts of Mulhouse and clears territory along Swiss border around Basel.

Over Germany, the Allied air forces continue to dominate the skies - US 8th Air Force attacks Gelsenkirchen with 61 bombers, Munster with 93 bombers, and Blechammer with 190 bombers while RAF Bomber Command sends 183 aircraft to attack Homberg during the day, 43 aircraft to attack Koblenz, 63 aircraft to attack Hannover, 14 aircraft to attack Homberg, and 14 aircraft to attack Castrop-Rauxel (all overnight).

In Italy, the British 8th Army takes Castiglione after a minor battle and while US 12th Air Force bombers are grounded by inclement weather conditions, a few fighters attack targets around Modena, Parma, and San Felice de Benaco.

For the last time, Hitler leaves the Wolfsschanze Headquarters for Berlin, Germany.

Pictured: Soldiers from the 22nd trying to dry out a blanket, Hurtgen Forest, November 20, 1944.; S/Sgt Peter Andrews, 22nd Infantry, 4th Division, examines "pole charges" containing 20 1/2 pound blocks of TNT which are being used to blow up German pillboxes.; American infantrymen of the 95th Inf Div patrol in search of snipers, Metz, France, November 20, 1944.

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crimsonaudio

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November 21, 1944: Tuesday - today marks 24 weeks (168 days) since the D-Day Invasion in Normandy and the beginning of the liberation of Europe.

The 121st Infantry Regiment (part of 8th Infantry Division) is deployed in the Vossenack area and given the mission of pushing up the road to the town of Hürtgen. The only difference this time (compared to the previous failed attacks by the 109th and 12th Infantry) is that the 121st Infantry is assigned a combat command from the 5th Armored Division to reinforce the attack once it penetrates the initial forward German defense lines. The attack by the 121st Infantry is immediately stopped in the Wilde Sau minefield, which has been continually refreshed by German engineers. This allows the German 7th Army to concentrate eight artillery battalions on the 121st Infantry, firing an average 3,500 rounds a day on the American troops. During this stalemate and barrage of artillery, Staff Sergeant John Minick voluntarily leads a small group of men through the minefield, single-handedly silencing two enemy machine gun emplacements, and engages a company-sized force of German soldiers before being killed while crossing a second minefield. For these actions, he was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor - the official Medal of Honor citation reads:

“He displayed conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his own life, above and beyond the call of duty, in action involving actual conflict with the enemy on 21 November 1944, near Hurtgen, Germany. S/Sgt. Minick's battalion was halted in its advance by extensive minefields, exposing troops to heavy concentrations of enemy artillery and mortar fire. Further delay in the advance would result in numerous casualties and a movement through the minefield was essential. Voluntarily, S/Sgt. Minick led 4 men through hazardous barbed wire and debris, finally making his way through the minefield for a distance of 300 yards. When an enemy machinegun opened fire, he signaled his men to take covered positions, edged his way alone toward the flank of the weapon and opened fire, killing 2 members of the guncrew and capturing 3 others. Moving forward again, he encountered and engaged single-handedly an entire company killing 20 Germans and capturing 20, and enabling his platoon to capture the remainder of the hostile group. Again moving ahead and spearheading his battalion's advance, he again encountered machinegun fire. Crawling forward toward the weapon, he reached a point from which he knocked the weapon out of action. Still another minefield had to be crossed. Undeterred, S/Sgt. Minick advanced forward alone through constant enemy fire and while thus moving, detonated a mine and was instantly killed."

Elsewhere, British 2nd Army continues its attacks near Venlo but suspends operations in Geilenkirchen-Linnich sector. US 1st and 9th Armies meet firm resistance from German forces west of the Roer River. The US 3rd Army continues the siege of Metz while other elements gain ground near Saarebourg. US 7th Army continues pushing toward Strasbourg and St Die.

Over Germany, the US 8th Air Force attacks Merseburg with 200 bombers, Hamburg with 349 bombers, Osnabruk with 166 bombers, and various targets of opportunity with 422 bombers. RAF Bomber Command sends 160 aircraft to attack Homberg during the day (escorted by Fighter Command), 283 aircraft to attack Aschaffenburg overnight, 273 aircraft to attack Castrop-Rauxel overnight, 270 aircraft to attack Sterkrade overnight, 138 aircraft to attack the Mittellland canal overnight, 123 aircraft to attack the Dortmund-Ems canal overnight, 29 aircraft to attack Stuttgart overnight, 26 aircraft to attack Hannover overnight, and 19 aircraft to attack Worms overnight. The Luftwaffe loses 86 fighters in daylight operations in defense of the Reich and occupied territory against Allied strategic bombing.

In Italy, the battle for the gothic Line of German defenses continues as forces of the British 8th Army open new attacks toward Faenza and US 12th Air Force aircraft provide ground support and attack transportation targets in the Po valley and at the Brenner Pass.

Hitler arrives Berlin where he will live in the Reich Chancellery and its underground bunker.

Pictured: US troops moving though the Hurtgen, November 21, 1944.; Medal of Honor recipient Staff Sergeant John Minick.; Members from the 607th Tank Destroyer Battalion (attached to the 95th Infantry Division) loading their gun on the outskirts of Metz, November 21, 1944.; M8 Greyhound from 30th Infantry Division moves out from from Kinzweiler, Germany, November 21, 1944.

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Tidewater

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November 21, 1944: ... The Luftwaffe loses 86 fighters in daylight operations in defense of the Reich and occupied territory against Allied strategic bombing.
That's a tough day at th office right there. The Luftwaffe could not afford too many days like that. I wonder how many of the pilots survived.
 

TIDE-HSV

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One of our elderly German neighbors passed away recently and the spouse is in assisted living. I picked up a couple of items at the estate sale today, among them a book - " Der Zweite Weltkrieg, Bilder, Daten, Dokumente." I look forward to reading that point of view...
 

Bazza

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One of our elderly German neighbors passed away recently and the spouse is in assisted living. I picked up a couple of items at the estate sale today, among them a book - " Der Zweite Weltkrieg, Bilder, Daten, Dokumente." I look forward to reading that point of view...

Is it written in German? Sorry to hear of the loss. :(
 

crimsonaudio

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November 22, 1944: In the Hurtgen, the Germans continue to resist fiercely and to fall back slowly from one line of fortified positions to the next. Defensive enemy armor (dug-in with a prepared field of fire) is common. The attack of the 8th Infantry is delayed waiting for supporting armor, support that fails to arrive. The attack by the 1st Battalion begins at 9:30, with supporting fire furnished by the 2nd Battalion. The 1st Battalion stubbornly fights its way forward against strong resistance and succeeds in reaching the edge of its objective, Jagerhaus. At 11:20, the 3rd Battalion starts moving along the axis of advance of the 1st Battalion, then works back to the southeast, creating a partial encirclement of the enemy and resulting in the destruction and capture of large numbers. The area to the southeast is then considered clear.

The 12th Infantry moves to assembly areas to the north of the new division right (south) boundary. It closes there by 12:15 as division reserve. The 22nd Infantry’s objective is the road junction just short of Grosshau. The 1st Battalion feigns several false attacks after 8:00 and, it appears accomplishes its mission of distracting the Germans from the attack of the 3rd Battalion further to the north. The 3rd Battalion moves shortly after daylight. German mortar, artillery and small arms fire are everywhere but the advance continues and several machine gun positions are overrun. By 1:35 PM, the attack pushes to a point where the road junction is under direct fire. The battalion consolidates its positions to cut the roads. Direct artillery fire is taken from the western edge of Grosshau, which is within sight. A small enemy attack is repulsed by the 2nd Battalion at 9:05. At 9:50 the 2nd Battalion attacks to the east and immediately encounters stubborn resistance, including fire from two dug-in, self-propelled guns. Slow progress is made and despite high casualties, the battalion continues to advance until the left flank is approximately 500 yards to the southwest of the 1st Battalion - after which the positions are consolidated.

Operations of the US 9th Army and the US 1st Army secure Eschweiler, but the 1st Army is under attack around Kommerscheidt and Vossenack. Forces of the US 3rd Army capture Metz, although several of the surrounding forts refuse to surrender. US 7th Army forces take St. Die as others approach Saverne. The French 1st Army occupies Mulhouse, after defeating a counterattack by German forces. Canadian 1st Army continues clearing Walcheren Island, attacking along the Maas, and attacking around Moerdijk and shifts boundary to take over Nijmegen sector from British 2nd Army.

Over Germany, US 8th Air Force attacks Hamburg with 280 bombers, Mittelland canal with 204 bombers, Sterkrade with 134 bombers, Neumunster with 254 bombers, Duisburg with 65 bombers, and targets of opportunity with 64 bombers. US 15th Air Force attacks Vienna, Moosbierbaum, Kapfenberg, and other targets. RAF Bomber Command sends 738 aircraft to attack Gelsenkirchen during the day (escorted by Fighter Command), 48 aircraft to attack Gelsenkirchen overnight, 235 aircraft to attack the Mittelland canal overnight, 128 aircraft to attack Koblenz overnight, and 18 aircraft to attack Hannover overnight. The Luftwaffe loses eight fighters in daylight operations in defense of the Reich and occupied territory against Allied strategic bombing

In Italy, the British 8th Army attacks around Monte Chioda, Monte Pratello, and Monte Testa while the US 5th Army captures Monte Monsignano. US 12th Air Force aircraft attack Brenner Pass and provide ground support, the US 15th Air Force attacks Bolzano, and US Navy destroyer Plunkett bombards German positions around Ventimiglia.

In Canada, the Army High Command threatens to resign if the government does not impose conscription to send soldiers into overseas battle. Later that evening at a cabinet meeting, Prime Minister King announces that the request for volunteers for overseas duty had failed. With a risk of District Officers Commanding threatening to resign, the only option left is mandatory conscription. The cabinet agrees to set a limit of 16,000 troops, defense Minister Andrew McNaughton recommends to Cabinet that all 16,000 conscripted soldiers be sent to fight in Europe.

Pictured: A heavy German infantry gun firing in defense of a U.S. attack on November 22, 1944 in the Hurtgen forest; British infantry in action in the streets of Geilenkirchen.; Men of 2nd Battalion, The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders hitch a ride on a flail tank, November 22, 1944.; Situation map from November 22, 1944.

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UAH

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I have an old shoe box of photos and have been going through them as a result this incredible thread by crimsonaudio. There is mystery in each of the 75 year old photos and I would like to share a few of them to the degree that I can obtain quality scans. This one I scanned at maximum dpi and was able to read the sign which read: You are now 1 mile from Germany Courtesy "66" Engr. Btn.
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UAH

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A series of three photos of the 155 mm "Long Tom" being loaded and fired. In the first photo the charges are on the left and the 155 mm round is in it's cradle on the right, then it is loaded into the breach and fired in the third photo which shows the gun caught at full recoil, the percussive effect is evident in the photo. I believe these photos were taken by my Dad in Czechoslovakia in the final week of the war when the 4th Armored Division was ordered to attack from Bavaria into the former Sudetenland.

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Tidewater

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I have an old shoe box of photos and have been going through them as a result this incredible thread by crimsonaudio. There is mystery in each of the 75 year old photos and I would like to share a few of them to the degree that I can obtain quality scans. This one I scanned at maximum dpi and was able to read the sign which read: You are now 1 mile from Germany Courtesy "66" Engr. Btn.
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I looked for a 66th Engineer Battalion and could not find it.
4th Armored Division Order of Battle.
The 4th AD had the 24th Armored Engineer Battalion to do the division's engineering.
The 4th AD had a 66th Armored Artillery Battalion, however. Is it possible that that unit built the bridge? (I can't see the sign clearly enough.

Thanks for posting the photos. They are great. You ought to consider sending images to the National Museum of the U.S. Army at Ft. Belvior, Vir. or the U.S. Army Center for Military History. You never know what some future historian might be looking for and, as George Custer said in his dying utterance, "A picture is worth a thousand words."
 
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crimsonaudio

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November 23, 1944: In the battle of the Hurtgen Forest, the Germans continue to stubbornly resist the advance of the 4th Infantry Division by firing over the numerous mine fields, wire entanglements, and road blocks. Once the advance shows signs of slowing down, the enemy counterattacks fiercely with near full platoon strength due to reinforcements. Four vicious counterattacks are repulsed. The 4th ID continues the attack to the northeast in the direction of Duren and despite strong resistance by a variety of weapons of war (small arms, machine guns, artillery, mortars, mines, booby traps and well defended bunkers), secures important terrain. The 8th Infantry attacks at 8:40 with the 2nd Battalion and after the capture of a number of unarmed prisoners, is able to move toward its objective. Once again supply problems delay the attack and the 3rd Battalion is unable to move before 9:00. A slow advance continues and good progress is made. However, due to extremely heavy enemy fire, the 1st Battalion is unable to move forward, held in check throughout the day.

The 12th Infantry moves its 1st Battalion to a forward assembly area at 9:45. An hour later, the 2nd Battalion initiates an attack to the east - a mine field is encountered soon after but the battalion crosses the main north-south road by early afternoon. In the late afternoon, the battalion is stopped short of its objective by additional mines and enemy resistance, and the troops dig in for the night.

The orders to the 22nd Infantry are to consolidate positions, to clear the rear areas and routes forward, and to secure four key trail and road junctions. A small task force organized by the 1st Battalion moves eastward at in the morning to clear the road, it is completed early that afternoon despite heavy artillery and mortar fire. Enemy pressure on the northern flank of the 3rd Battalion increases during the morning but no ground is gained by the Germans. Enemy mortar and artillery fire continue to pound the battalion area. By noon, the 2nd Battalion has readjusted its lines and controls the trail junction. The battalion continues to take very heavy enemy artillery fire.

US 9th Army captures Bourheim, Lohn, Pattern, and part of Merzenhausen but German forces deliver strong counterattacks. US 3rd Army continues to battle, making limited progress.

On the right flank of the German line, the 15th Army falls back in Holland. Meanwhile, the German 7th Army launches attacks on forces of US 9th Army. To the south, French troops of US 7th Army reach Strasbourg. The British 2nd Army continues closing to the Maas River from Venlo northward.

Over Germany, the US 8th Air Force attacks Gelsenkirchen with 134 bombers while RAF Bomber Command sends 168 aircraft to attack Gelsenkirchen during the day and 61 aircraft to attack Hannover overnight.

On the eastern front, German units are withdrawing from Finnish Lapland into Norway. The German evacuation from Oesel (Saaremaa) Island is completed overnight. Soviet 2nd Ukrainian Front attacks around Budapest as supplies dwindle.

In Italy, the British 8th Army captures Monte Ricci and continues to push across the Cosina River while US 12th Air Force fighters conduct limited sorties due to poor weather conditions.

Pictured: US soldier fighting for every inch of ground in the Hurtgen Forest.; US troops liberating a small village in the Hurtgen Forest, November 23, 1944.; Battalion Aid Station personnel readying casualties for evacuation farther to the rear.; GIs of the 102nd Infantry Division enjoy a Thanksgiving meal in Waurichen, Germany, November 23, 1944.

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crimsonaudio

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November 24, 1944: The German forces in the Hurtgen Forest spend the overnight hours laying more mines, building barriers, and digging defenses which they then defend until forced to slowly fall back to each successive line of defenses. It also becomes evident that under the cover of darkness the Germans have brought up replacements (likely remnants of units almost totally wiped out), which serve to absorb the brunt of 4th Infantry Division’s first attack during the day.

The 12th Infantry Regiment on the right and 8th Infantry Regiment on the left advance slowly throughout the day against a stubborn enemy in heavily wooded terrain which is made even more difficult due to the near-constant rain.

The 8th Infantry is ordered to continue the attack in the direction of Duren by 8:30. Company B, 1st Battalion, is unable to continue forward movement until 10:00 due to heavy artillery and mortar fire, in addition to extremely heavy small arms fire from the well entrenched German forces. Soon after 10:00, Companies B and C, 1st Battalion, push forward and reach the objective, there they are relieved by the 3rd Battalion. The 2nd Battalion advances slowly, meeting heavy machine gun and small arms fire in addition to artillery and mortar fire. By the end of the day, it has captured a large number of German POWs, weapons and equipment.

The 12th Infantry continues the attack with the 3rd Battalion - it advances rapidly and by late morning is moving onto its objective. The 2nd Battalion reaches its objective and by noon has firm control. Only a few hours later, 2nd Battalion makes contact with the 121st Infantry (8th Infantry Division). The 1st Battalion cleans up enemy groups in the rear areas and establishes contact with the 24th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron.

The US 1st Army continues to be heavily engaged in Hurtgen Forest, while the US 3rd Army captures crossings over the Saar River, about 25 miles north of Saarbrucken and is attacking around Orscholz Line, Tettingen, Butzdorf, Oberleuken, Hilsprich, Postroff, Kirrberg, and Baerendorf. French 2nd Armored Division captures Strasbourg, France while French 1st Army captures Grosmagny and Petit-Magny while Germans maintain pressure around Mulhouse. US 7th Army attempts to push forward and reinforce Strasbourg but the Germans continue to make strong counterattacks around Sarrebourg. The British 2nd Army is closing to the Maas River from Venlo northward

In Italy, the British 8th Army crosses the Marzeno River and pushes toward the Lamone River while the US 5th Army captures Monte Belvedere but later loses it to German counterattack.

Pictured: Sgt Mike Ala, 4th Infantry Division, Hurtgen Forest, late November 1944.; V Corps rocket launchers bombarding German positions in the Hurtgen, November 24, 1944.; Dutch girls write slogans and messages for friends and relatives in other towns on tanks.; The Free French 2nd Armored – spearheading for the US Seventh Army – liberates the city of Strasbourg is Alsace/Lorraine resulting in the capture of over three thousand prisoners and the formation of the Colmar Pocket, November 24, 1944.

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formersoldier71

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For those interested in a deeper look at the Battle of the Hurtgen Forest, I stumbled onto a recent video series on youtube made by a Belgian. So far, his series covers the 28th ID's battles from Nov 2-4. The first video covers the capture of Vossenack and other movements on Nov 2:
 

UAH

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I looked for a 66th Engineer Battalion and could not find it.
4th Armored Division Order of Battle.
The 4th AD had the 24th Armored Engineer Battalion to do the division's engineering.
The 4th AD had a 66th Armored Artillery Battalion, however. Is it possible that that unit built the bridge? (I can't see the sign clearly enough.

Thanks for posting the photos. They are great. You ought to consider sending images to the National Museum of the U.S. Army at Ft. Belvior, Vir. or the U.S. Army Center for Military History. You never know what some future historian might be looking for and, as George Custer said in his dying utterance, "A picture is worth a thousand words."
Thank you. I looked at the original scan again and will plan on sending to you to determine if we can decipher it. It could be 166 Engr. Bn. also just underneath it appears to have another that appears to be 815 Engr Bn. There just isn't enough clarity to determine exactly. You can appreciate that I have looked at the photo 100 times before scanning it to grasp what is actually depicted. I now see the dog in the photo at what appears to be a water tank and two jeeps sitting in the valley on the opposite side of the valley.
 

crimsonaudio

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November 25, 1944: As the US troops continue to slowly advance through the Hurtgen , they find the German resistance to the 8th and 12th Infantry Regiments stubborn and effective. Small arms, mortars and artillery are utilized and a number of self-propelled assault guns are used with good results against the 22nd Infantry Regiment. The Germans are overrun by 12th Infantry in its zone of advance and the resulting confusion and ineffectiveness on the part of the Germans made it apparent that once the main line of resistance could be breached, lack of leadership, poor contact and incompetent troops made the enemy a “pushover”.

The intermittent rain has made the few roads and trails into a muddy mess which hinders the advance - it is almost impossible for the tanks and tank destroyers to keep up with the advancing infantry.

The 2nd Battalion, 8th Infantry, attacks to the southeast, shortly after it repulses a small counterattack by 40 to 50 German infantry, then continues the advance and by late afternoon, has successfully captured its objective. The 3rd Battalion strengthens its previous positions and patrols.

The 12th Infantry attacks at 8:00 and makes good progress through the thickly wooded and hilly terrain, facing light resistance from the disorganized Germans. It succeeds in seizing its objective and from that position is able to assist the attack of the 5th Armored Division on Hurtgen. The three battalions then mop up small pockets of German troops they by-passed earlier.

The plan of the 22nd Infantry is to attack with 2nd and 3rd Battalions, without artillery preparation in hope of surprising the enemy. The 3rd Battalion is to envelope Grosshau to the north, and the 2nd is to reach the edge of the woods at the southwest. The 2nd Battalion, delayed by the attached armor unable to negotiate the poor roads, attacks at 8:20 and the 3rd Battalion at 7:45 and both battalions encounter heavy resistance immediately. The advance of the 2nd Battalion is fiercely contested but by late morning they are on their objective, the edge of the woods overlooking Grosshau. By 8:45, the 3rd Battalion makes it to the high ground and pauses for reorganization (and movement of the armor) before assaulting the town of Grosshau. Just before noon it attacks across the open field leading to the town. The enemy reacts swiftly with very heavy, aimed fire and stops the attack, destroying four tanks and two tank destroyers. Further attempts are repulsed and by mid-afternoon, the battalion has dug in to the north after suffering heavy casualties.

Forces of US 1st Army, to the southeast of Aachen, continue their advance while the US 9th Army is engaged around Bourheim and Koslar. US 3rd Army opens attacks toward the Sarre and continues to assault Oscholz Line. British 2nd Army completes clearing west bank of the Maas from junction with Canadian 2nd Army southward and the US 7th Army is clearing Strasbourg area.

Over Germany, US 8th Air Force attacks Merseburg with 671 bombers, Bingen with 254 bombers, and begins utilizing 36th Heavy Bombardment squadron for electronic counter-measure operations and jamming German ECM systems. RAF Bomber Command sends 68 aircraft to attack Nuremberg overnight.

In Italy, the British 8th Army is fighting across the Marzeno River, the Montone River, and the Lamone River. US 12th Air Force bombers are grounded while fighters conduct 53 sorties against transportation targets.

Hitler calls upon all German citizens to fight and tells the German troops: The war will now decide whether the German people shall continue to exist or perish.

Pictured: Engineers repair a muddy road in the Hurtgen Forest, late November, 1944.; US Army Pfc. W. J. Kessler, Pfc. J. L. Proffitt, Pvt. B. Narter, Cpl. T. J. Barnewski, and Pfc. J. Stoll handling Christmas packages from home for their artillery unit, Germany, November 25, 1944.; Hitler Youth members on march in a German city, en route to volunteer to join the military, November 25, 1944.; Troops from the 1st Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment man trenches in the front line in Holland, November 25, 1944.

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