75th anniversary of D-Day...

crimsonaudio

Administrator
Staff member
Sep 9, 2002
46,132
5,965
353
crimsonaudio.net
July 10, 1944: The northern part of the town of Caen is finally liberated more than one month after D-Day, though the city was initially intended to be captured by the evening of June 6 - this 34 day delay highlights the dead-end at which the British and Canadians have found themselves. Once the northern sector of Caen (which is almost entirely destroyed by the Allied aerial bombing) is captured, the British forces decide to focus once again on the key position of Hill 112, located less than two miles southwest of the capital of the Calvados, Caen. This offensive is part of Operation Jupiter, which aims at drilling into the front in the valley of Odon, southwest of Caen, and crossing the Orne river. The 8th British Corps launches its offensive towards Hill 112 and though its progress is supported by the Allied fighter-bombers and artillery, the German resistance remains very strong and limits the British headway in this sector. Hill 112 is defended by the soldiers of the 2nd SS Armored Corps, which are aware of the strategic importance of this position - it defends the accesses of the southern area of Caen, currently held by the Panzergroupwest (led by Eberbach). The 43th British Infantry division Wessex moves towards the village of Maltot, four miles southwest of Caen, and while it manages to enter the city, the German defenders of the 9th and 10 SS Panzer Division push hard. Utilizing heavy fire they isolate some British soldiers in the village: the Allied losses are very heavy and they are forced to back up a mile to the north of Maltot.

The Americans continue they difficult progress to the north of Periers and Saint-Lo - slow in spite of the intensive bombing from the Allied air force and artillery. The American soldiers face very bloody battles known under the name ‘The Battle of the Hedgerows’. Although slowed by the resistance and terrain, the tirelessly push past the marshy area in the south of Carentan and continue progress.

Over France, RAF 2nd Tactical Air Force conducting ground support missions, offensive sorties, and defensive patrols and US 9th Air Force fighters attack multiple targets. RAF Bomber Command sends 223 aircraft to attack V-weapons sites during the day.

On the eastern front, the Soviet 2nd Baltic Front (Yeremenko) launches an offensive along a 90-mile frontage, east of Idritsa. Soviet forces capture Utena and Slonim from German forces of Army Group Center. In Berlin, Hitler refuses a request by Field Marshal Model, commanding the shattered Army Group Center, to allow Army Group North to withdraw behind the Dvina. The intent is to bolster the defenses of Army Group Center and prevent Army Group North being cut off by the Soviet drive into the Baltics.

In Italy, British 8th Army prepares for new attacks. US 5th Army makes slow progress northward toward Livorno. US 12th Air Force aircraft conducts limited attacks against targets including Modena due to poor weather conditions.

Pictured: The interior of Caen Cathedral showing the damaged organ, July 10, 1944; Troops of 1 Kings Own Scottish Borderers (KOSB), 9th Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, firing a captured Hotchkiss machine gun during street fighting in Caen, July 10, 1944; US Army soldiers of 2nd Battalion, 33rd Armor Regiment, move through the battle-scarred streets of Saint-Fromond as combat engineers repair communication lines during the Battle of Normandy. Saint-Fromond, Manche, Lower Normandy, France. July 10, 1944; A Martin B-26C-45-MA Marauderfrom the 441st BS, 320th BG, 12th AF is shot down by flak on the July 10, 1944 mission to bomb Marzabotto. Six crew members were killed.

0710a.jpg

0710b.jpg

0710c.jpg

0710d.jpg
 

Tidewater

Hall of Fame
Mar 15, 2003
17,564
1,890
173
Hooterville, Vir.
July 10, 1944: The northern part of the town of Caen is finally liberated more than one month after D-Day, though the city was initially intended to be captured by the evening of June 6 - this 34 day delay highlights the dead-end at which the British and Canadians have found themselves. Once the northern sector of Caen (which is almost entirely destroyed by the Allied aerial bombing) is captured, the British forces decide to focus once again on the key position of Hill 112, located less than two miles southwest of the capital of the Calvados, Caen. This offensive is part of Operation Jupiter, which aims at drilling into the front in the valley of Odon, southwest of Caen, and crossing the Orne river. The 8th British Corps launches its offensive towards Hill 112 and though its progress is supported by the Allied fighter-bombers and artillery, the German resistance remains very strong and limits the British headway in this sector. Hill 112 is defended by the soldiers of the 2nd SS Armored Corps, which are aware of the strategic importance of this position - it defends the accesses of the southern area of Caen, currently held by the Panzergroupwest (led by Eberbach). The 43th British Infantry division Wessex moves towards the village of Maltot, four miles southwest of Caen, and while it manages to enter the city, the German defenders of the 9th and 10 SS Panzer Division push hard. Utilizing heavy fire they isolate some British soldiers in the village: the Allied losses are very heavy and they are forced to back up a mile to the north of Maltot.
It is probably post-facto rationalization, but Monty would say that his continued pushes towards Caen drew some of the best German units (1, 2nd, 9th, 10th & 12th SS Panzer Divisions and 21st Panzer) to the eastern (British & Canadian) end of the front. As events played out, the Germans really needed their best mobile troops on the western (American) end of the front because once the Americans took Avranches, the front got a lot more mobile and almost all the German divisions at that end were dismounted, foot-mobile infantry, which had absolutely no hope of containing Patton's 3rd Army, on mobility considerations alone. Every soldier in Patton's army had a vehicle to ride in and Jerries walking at 2 mph just could not keep up and the German front burst like a balloon.
 
Last edited:

TIDE-HSV

Senior Administrator
Staff member
Oct 13, 1999
69,186
6,866
423
Huntsville, AL,USA
It is probably post-facto rationalization, but Monty would say that his continued pushes towards Caen drew some of the best German units (1, 2nd, 9th, 10th & 12th SS Panzer Divisions and 21st Panzer) to the eastern (British & Canadian) end of the front. As events played out, the Germans really needed their best mobile troops on the western (American) end of the front because once the Americans took Avranches, the front got a lot more mobile and almost all the German divisions at that end were dismounted, foot-mobile infantry, which had absolutely no hope of containing Patton's 3rd Army, on mobility considerations alone. Every soldier in Patton's army had a vehicle to rise in and Jerries walking at 2 mph just could not keep up and the German front burst like a balloon.
And there's probably some truth in that. Playing into that was Hitler's determination not to give and inch anywhere, and particularly not in the strategic city of Caen...
 

Tidewater

Hall of Fame
Mar 15, 2003
17,564
1,890
173
Hooterville, Vir.
And there's probably some truth in that. Playing into that was Hitler's determination not to give and inch anywhere, and particularly not in the strategic city of Caen...
The Germans certainly could not let the Allied pierce the front in the east, because then they'd have a shorter route to Germany than the Germans would. You could see it coming for weeks. The American advances in June were a very tough slog, but in July, the front started loosening up, and the American advance built up steam. In front of the Americans in the west, the front was swinging back like a door and when it got to Avranches, it was over. It did not take a rocket surgeon to see what would happen next.
Falaise POcket Map.jpg
In forming the Falaise pocket the Canadians only had to advance a few miles (against very good German units) but the American XV Corps went al the way southeast to Le Mans before turning north to Alencon and Argentan. There were just no German units out there to stop them.

I'm getting ahead of the story though. Apologies, Brad.
 
Last edited:

Go Bama

Hall of Fame
Dec 6, 2009
7,834
1,851
173
Thirteenessee
The Germans certainly could not let the Allied pierce the front in the east, because then they'd have a shorter route to Germany than the Germans would. You could see it coming for weeks. The American advances in June were a very tough slog, but in July, the front started loosening up, and the American advance built up steam. In front of the Americans in the west, the front was swinging back like a door and when it got to Avranches, it was over. It did not take a rocket surgeon to see what would happen next.
View attachment 3876
In forming the Falaise pocket the Canadians only had to advance a few miles (against very good German units) but the American XV Corps went al the way southeast to Le Mans before turning north to Alencon and Argentan. There were just no German units out there to stop them.

I'm getting ahead of the story though. Apologies, Brad.
I get an invalid attachment message when clicking the link. Is it a map?
 

TIDE-HSV

Senior Administrator
Staff member
Oct 13, 1999
69,186
6,866
423
Huntsville, AL,USA
The Germans certainly could not let the Allied pierce the front in the east, because then they'd have a shorter route to Germany than the Germans would. You could see it coming for weeks. The American advances in June were a very tough slog, but in July, the front started loosening up, and the American advance built up steam. In front of the Americans in the west, the front was swinging back like a door and when it got to Avranches, it was over. It did not take a rocket surgeon to see what would happen next.
View attachment 3876
In forming the Falaise pocket the Canadians only had to advance a few miles (against very good German units) but the American XV Corps went al the way southeast to Le Mans before turning north to Alencon and Argentan. There were just no German units out there to stop them.

I'm getting ahead of the story though. Apologies, Brad.
The supply lines were starting to fill up a bit more also, even though Cherbourg was not yet fully operational...
 

Go Bama

Hall of Fame
Dec 6, 2009
7,834
1,851
173
Thirteenessee
Check it now. It should show the front 1-13 Aug 1944 and the XV Corps (3rd U.S. Army) making serious tracks.
Avranches=>Le Mans=>Argentan = 274 km in ~10 days.
Thanks, I see it now and I think I see your point. After Avranches Patton went through the Germans like poop through a tin horn because Caen had to be held which occupied a large portion of the German vehicles. Like cavalry vs foot soldiers.
 

crimsonaudio

Administrator
Staff member
Sep 9, 2002
46,132
5,965
353
crimsonaudio.net
July 11, 1944: It’s Tuesday - today is D+35, marking 5 weeks since the D-Day Invasion at Normandy and the beginning of the liberation of Europe.

The Germans, having just lost the town of Caen the day before, launch an offensive in the Cotentin peninsula, aware that the Americans’ slow progress in the bocage means they are limited in their ability to defend an attack, despite Allied control of the air. The Germans decide to attack in the direction of Saint-Jean-de-Daye - the center of the American front and directly to the north of Saint-Lo. They precede their attack with a bombardment by their artillery, however, the Americans of 9th and 39th infantry divisions fight the German forces of the Panzer Lehr with fierce resistance and hold their ground. Heavy tanks battles occur in the Normand bocage, and by the end of the morning, the US forces take the advantage while launching a counter-offensive directed towards Saint-Lo. They then progress like the previous days, inching forward despite heavy losses.

The British cannot take the time to enjoy their victory in the north of Caen as the 2nd Army (led by general Dempsey) continues its offensive in the direction of Hill 112, still defended by the western Panzergruppe led by Eberbach - the British capture the hill later in the afternoon. 30th Corps of British 2nd Army attacks around Hottot-les-Bagues east of Caen.

Over France, RAF Bomber Command sends 32 aircraft to attack a V-weapons site during the day and sends Spitfires to escort Bomber Command. US 9th Air Force attacks V-weapons sites and other targets with bombers and supporting fighters.

Over Germany, US 8th Air Force attacks Munich with 969 bombers and Augsburg with 38 bombers.
On the eastern front, the remaining 35,000 men of German 4th Army surrender to Soviet troops at Minsk.

In Italy, British 8th Army continues preparing for new attacks around Arezzo while US 5th Army makes slow progress northward toward Livorno. US 12th Air Force aircraft attack multiple targets including Alessandria, Chiavari, and Rimini.

Pictured: American 105mm Howitzer M3 shelling German forces near Carentan, France, July 11, 1944; GIs rush a burning house in Sainteny, Normandy. July 11, 1944; Canadian soldiers fire into a battered house. July 11, 1944, Caen, France; A British soldier carries a little girl through the devastation of Caen, July 11, 1944

711a.jpg

711b.jpg

711c.jpg

711d.jpg
 

formersoldier71

All-American
May 9, 2004
3,769
49
63
49
Jasper, AL
July 11, 1944: It’s Tuesday - today is D+35, marking 5 weeks since the D-Day Invasion at Normandy and the beginning of the liberation of Europe.

Pictured: American 105mm Howitzer M3 shelling German forces near Carentan, France, July 11, 1944...

View attachment 3878
My high school history teacher was a 1950's Army vet. He told the class once about serving in artillery and turning away with your mouth open and leaving the chin strap undone while firing.
This picture made me think of that. Looks like the guy on the right didn't get the memo.
 

TIDE-HSV

Senior Administrator
Staff member
Oct 13, 1999
69,186
6,866
423
Huntsville, AL,USA
My high school history teacher was a 1950's Army vet. He told the class once about serving in artillery and turning away with your mouth open and leaving the chin strap undone while firing.
This picture made me think of that. Looks like the guy on the right didn't get the memo.
Didn't matter. The Howitzers ruined all the guys hearing. For that matter, all of the bomber crews suffered the same hearing damage. The ear can protect temporarily from a detonation. The constant roar of propellers/engines for hours on end was a different matter...
 

BamaFlum

Hall of Fame
Dec 11, 2002
6,318
207
73
49
S.A., TX, USA
Didn't matter. The Howitzers ruined all the guys hearing. For that matter, all of the bomber crews suffered the same hearing damage. The ear can protect temporarily from a detonation. The constant roar of propellers/engines for hours on end was a different matter...
Stupid question: why didn’t they plug their ears, even with their fingers?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

crimsonaudio

Administrator
Staff member
Sep 9, 2002
46,132
5,965
353
crimsonaudio.net
July 12, 1944: The German offensive launched yesterday on the American front near Saint-Jean-de-la-Daye has failed. The American forces take the advantage and continue their progress to the south in the direction of Periers and Saint-Lo, but although pushed back on July 11 and severely weakened, the Germans fiercely resist and prevent the American forces from progressing quickly. The German soldiers of the 17th SS Panzergrenadier Division even launch a new counter-attack towards Carentan. Heavy fighting has been occurring near Hill 147, which is taken, lost, then taken again at intervals of several hours by the two sides. But today, the 116th American Infantry Regiment captures the top of the hill, which offers the perfect position for the Allied artillery to continue the bombardment of Saint-Lo. In the village of Meautis, General Theodore Roosevelt, son of President Theodore Roosevelt and second in command of the 4th American Infantry division, dies following a heart attack under an apple tree where he is taking a break. He is buried in the provisional cemetery on Omaha Beach and later awarded the Medal of Honor.

At the same time, the British continue their push towards Hill 112, defended by SS troops belonging to the Western Panzergruppe led by Eberbach. The British and Canadians attack along a line parallel to the road connecting Caen to Villers-Bocage. No less than 6six infantry divisions, supported by several tanks battalions, move to the southwest of Caen and follow the Odon river. East of Caen, the 51st British Infantry division also moves towards the southwest to liberate this part of the city, previously held by the Germans. Though the battles are violent, the German SS Mechanized Infantry divisions move back while opposing with savage resistance.

Over France, RAF Bomber Command sends 245 aircraft to attack V-weapons sites, 159 aircraft to attack rail yards, and 296 Spitfires to escort Bomber Command daylight operations. US 9th Air Force attacks multiple targets with 300 bombers and supporting fighters. RAF Bomber Command sends 385 aircraft to attack rail yards and 230 aircraft to attack V-weapons sites overnight.

On the eastern front, Soviet 2nd Baltic Front forces capture Idritsa. Soviet 2nd Baltic Front smashes through German 16th Army and pushes into rear areas. Soviet 3rd Belorussian Front fighting into the now encircled Vilnius. Soviet 1st Ukrainian Front probing German Army Group North Ukraine.

In Italy, US 5th Army captures Laiatico and Castiglioncello. US 12th Air Force attacks transportation lines, bridges, supply dumps, and other targets including Florence-Livorno area while bombers begin Operation Mallory Major to interdict road and rail bridges over Po River.

Pictured: Two American medics treat the hand of an injured comrade wearing a camouflage helmet, north of Saint-Lô, Normandy, France, July 12, 1944; The 'Meat Chopper' in action against ground targets, this is an M2 with field fitted M45 Maxson mount (M16B) belonging to 377th AAA Battalion. Normandy, July 12, 1944; Canadian troops in a German bunker at the Carpiquet Airport, July 12, 1944; A picture I took of General Theodore Roosevelt’s gravestone at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial at Omaha Beach on June 6, 2013

712a.jpg

0712b.jpg

0712c.jpg

712d.jpg
 

Tidewater

Hall of Fame
Mar 15, 2003
17,564
1,890
173
Hooterville, Vir.
The bunker looks like old trench warfare...
Last year I went to Fort Douaumont near Verdun (built in the 1890s). Even thought was built before WW I (on what was the Franco-German frontier 1871-1914), I was impressed at how advanced it was. "Disappearing" gun emplacements, underground tunnels connecting the underground barracks and the various parts of the fort.
I guess tech only advanced so far since then.
 

Tidewater

Hall of Fame
Mar 15, 2003
17,564
1,890
173
Hooterville, Vir.
The 'Meat Chopper'

*shudders*
It's not that the Luftwaffe never made an appearance over American army units after 1943, but AAA gunners were maybe the most underemployed soldiers in the ETO by 1944, which is why the army scavenged a lot of them to fill up the ranks of the infantry depleted by bloody battles in Normandy and the German frontier. I am not surprise somebody said, "Hey, duck hunters, why don't you take some quad .50s to the front and see what you can do to German infantry?
 

Latest threads

TideFansStore.com - Get your gear!

Purchases made through our TideFansStore.com link may result in a commission being paid to TideFans.