Cardinals Legend Bob Gibson Diagnosed With Pancreatic Cancer

Go Bama

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I hate to hear this. I watch a lot of the Cardinals games though I have not watched today’s game because I had a gig tonight and just got off the road. I do have it recorded.

Gibson is still very active with the Cardinals organization.

My understanding is pancreatic cancer treatments have improved recently.

Here he is the 5 year survival rate foer various forms of pancreatic cancer.


Stage5-Year Relative Survival Rate

Localized ... 34%

Regional
...
12%

Distant ... 3%


My favorite uncle died of pancreatic cancer in 2005. He didn’t live long at all after the diagnosis. OTOH, a friend at church seems to be doing pretty well. My uncle was 79. The friend at church is 67.

Prayers for Bob Gibson. I can’t think of another player in any sport who garners more respect from players and fans.
 

TIDE-HSV

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It's what took out my mother, at exactly my age. I had a good friend call and tell me the other day that he had been dxed. He's hoping to make it to the end of the year, so he can close out his practice in an orderly fashion. OTOH, I do have one friend who apparently is going to beat it. Remarkably, he beat prostate cancer around 7-8 years ago. In his case, it started in the duct end and caused symptoms immediately, so they caught it in the gland sack. Some years ago, I had another friend where they caught it there, as they did Ginsburg. It still got him, but it took around four years instead of <6 months...
 

selmaborntidefan

Hall of Fame
It's what took out my mother, at exactly my age. I had a good friend call and tell me the other day that he had been dxed. He's hoping to make it to the end of the year, so he can close out his practice in an orderly fashion. OTOH, I do have one friend who apparently is going to beat it. Remarkably, he beat prostate cancer around 7-8 years ago. In his case, it started in the duct end and caused symptoms immediately, so they caught it in the gland sack. Some years ago, I had another friend where they caught it there, as they did Ginsburg. It still got him, but it took around four years instead of <6 months...

I know we say this every time, but three things I absolutely do not want:
a) pancreatic cancer
b) glioblastoma multiformae
c) bone cancer

Catching it is almost to a large degree the result of how concerned one is to go to the doctor because (obviously what I hear as I have no firsthand experience) the presentation in most cases is someone thinks they pulled a muscle so they just take NSAIDs or tylenol.

I had one co-worker in his mid-40s. Vibrant, active guy, took care of himself, animal lover. Six weeks from diagnosis to death. And my former BIL lost out to it two years ago this week. They gave him 8 months, and he made it almost 18, but his quality of life was almost nonexistent. He was an active Vo Tech teacher at the school. One day he would be like absolutely nothing was wrong with him (other than maybe a little jaundice). The next three days, he wouldn't even move because it hurt so bad.
 

TIDE-HSV

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Oct 13, 1999
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I know we say this every time, but three things I absolutely do not want:
a) pancreatic cancer
b) glioblastoma multiformae
c) bone cancer

Catching it is almost to a large degree the result of how concerned one is to go to the doctor because (obviously what I hear as I have no firsthand experience) the presentation in most cases is someone thinks they pulled a muscle so they just take NSAIDs or tylenol.

I had one co-worker in his mid-40s. Vibrant, active guy, took care of himself, animal lover. Six weeks from diagnosis to death. And my former BIL lost out to it two years ago this week. They gave him 8 months, and he made it almost 18, but his quality of life was almost nonexistent. He was an active Vo Tech teacher at the school. One day he would be like absolutely nothing was wrong with him (other than maybe a little jaundice). The next three days, he wouldn't even move because it hurt so bad.
I'm at risk for the first two, with my mom's case. The second, I lost my brother and a first cousin to. Of the first two cancers, I'd select the second...
 

FitToBeTide

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I know we say this every time, but three things I absolutely do not want:
a) pancreatic cancer
b) glioblastoma multiformae
c) bone cancer

Catching it is almost to a large degree the result of how concerned one is to go to the doctor because (obviously what I hear as I have no firsthand experience) the presentation in most cases is someone thinks they pulled a muscle so they just take NSAIDs or tylenol.

I had one co-worker in his mid-40s. Vibrant, active guy, took care of himself, animal lover. Six weeks from diagnosis to death. And my former BIL lost out to it two years ago this week. They gave him 8 months, and he made it almost 18, but his quality of life was almost nonexistent. He was an active Vo Tech teacher at the school. One day he would be like absolutely nothing was wrong with him (other than maybe a little jaundice). The next three days, he wouldn't even move because it hurt so bad.
To those 3 I would add, d) Alzheimer's. A horrible, drawn-out disease that my dad had.
 

Go Bama

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Hope on the GBM front.

https://www.cell.com/cell-reports/fulltext/S2211-1247(18)30545-X



Summary

Cancer stem cells promote neoplastic growth, in part by deregulating asymmetric cell division and enhancing self-renewal. To uncover mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets in glioma stem cell (GSC) self-renewal, we performed a genetic suppressor screen for kinases to reverse the tumor phenotype of our Drosophila brain tumor model and identified dCdk5 as a critical regulator. CDK5, the human ortholog of dCdk5 (79% identity), is aberrantly activated in GBMs and tightly aligned with both chromosome 7 gains and stem cell markers affecting tumor-propagation. Our investigation revealed that pharmaceutical inhibition of CDK5 prevents GSC self-renewal in vitro and in xenografted tumors, at least partially by suppressing CREB1 activation independently of PKA/cAMP. Finally, our TCGA GBM data analysis revealed that CDK5, stem cell, and asymmetric cell division markers segregate within non-mesenchymal patient clusters, which may indicate preferential dependence on CDK5 signaling and sensitivity to its inhibition in this group.

Graphical Abstract

 

selmaborntidefan

Hall of Fame
To those 3 I would add, d) Alzheimer's. A horrible, drawn-out disease that my dad had.
You just reminded me of the first patient whose blood I ever drew who had that. It was one of the most bizarre things I've ever experienced.

I was training another tech how to draw blood. I'm in there and in a matter of five minutes, she thought I was her doctor, her son who fought in one of the long ago wars (based on her age, either WW2 or Korea), the guy who drew her blood every day (which was on the right track except I'd never met her until moments before), and one or two other people.


The closest thing I can describe is if you've ever seen the movie "Loose Canons," Dan Aykroyd spends the movie cycling through impersonation after impersonation or movie line after movie line, sometimes 7-8 clustered together.

I had no idea how to react or what to do - I was answering one question and she was asking me a different question as a different person.


I also saw it from a distance with the mother of a group of kids in our youth group at church. For example, we'd stand up for the meet and greet hymn, and you wouldn't notice anything. But then all of a sudden, she'd stand up right in the middle of the preaching and just look around with this completely spaced out look and her kids saying, "Mama! Sit down!"

I figure with my memory that's the kind of cruel twist of fate to befall me.
 

selmaborntidefan

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I'm hoping so.

I know Lee Atwater is by no means a popular individual in politics, but you ought to read the summary that's online of his last year of life that is adopted from his biography that came out about five or six years after he died. He went from "guy who is bursting all the time with nervous energy and runs six miles a day while a committed health nut" to "guy who can't even take care of himself" in a matter of months. (I even realize a lot of folks could hold the "good, he deserved it" POV, but let's try to be above that).
 

selmaborntidefan

Hall of Fame
I'm at risk for the first two, with my mom's case. The second, I lost my brother and a first cousin to. Of the first two cancers, I'd select the second...
I'm probably doomed with the only question being "what kind."

On my Dad's side of the family - his Dad's family had nine total siblings. Two were murdered and all of the other seven died of some form of cancer (lung for the smokers, prostate for one uncle, and my grandfather was so consumed they couldn't figure out where it had begun nine years earlier). Dad's mom's side - one brother had a heart attack and the other three kids all died of cancer in their mid-70s.

On Mom's side - her Mom died of a Triple A at 87, her Dad had a cerebral hem at 76. Mom's sister died of a heart attack at 74 a few years ago.

Oh.....and Dad had temporal arteritis and a stroke and his brother had a stroke (though both have recovered).
 

TIDE-HSV

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I'm probably doomed with the only question being "what kind."

On my Dad's side of the family - his Dad's family had nine total siblings. Two were murdered and all of the other seven died of some form of cancer (lung for the smokers, prostate for one uncle, and my grandfather was so consumed they couldn't figure out where it had begun nine years earlier). Dad's mom's side - one brother had a heart attack and the other three kids all died of cancer in their mid-70s.

On Mom's side - her Mom died of a Triple A at 87, her Dad had a cerebral hem at 76. Mom's sister died of a heart attack at 74 a few years ago.

Oh.....and Dad had temporal arteritis and a stroke and his brother had a stroke (though both have recovered).
Well, we all die of something. If it's not CAD or stroke, then it's likely going to be cancer. Those two syndromes cover the vast majority of deaths. After than, it drops way down to 6% of deaths from accidents and almost that percentage at just under 6%. (Looked it up recently.) So, everybody's family tree is going to look gruesome. It's when those ages start to be in the 30s, 40s and 50s, you start to worry about genes. It's normal if they're in the 70s and 80s...
 

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