Converting to Judaism

ValuJet

Moderator
Sep 28, 2000
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Thank you, and that's why I am considering the move. I just can't accept Jesus as God anymore. No offense to Christians, I just can't.
No reason to feel that way. I have known a couple of people who converted from Catholicism to Judaism. It didn't change who they were regarding my relationship with them, IMO. We all (Christians) don't go around brow beating people over this. I hope you find peace with your decision. :)

I'm probably not the ideal person to be out witnessing in the first place.
 

Probius

Hall of Fame
Mar 19, 2004
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What made you change your mind?
I have been listening to some sermons by a rabbi, and his arguments have changed my mind. He has discredited all of the OT quotes we use to prove Jesus is the messiah. And he has proven to me that the messiah was never expected to be God, but just a righteous man who will turn the peoples of the world to God. According to the scriptures the messiah will bring about the messianic age in which all nations and people will believe in God, and there will be no need to evangelize because no man will doubt. I don't believe we are living in that age, hence the messiah has not come. BTW, the rabbi is named Tovia Singer.
 

exiledNms

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Aug 2, 2002
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Research it carefully. Keeping the whole law is VERY tough, at best! (I recognize that not all varieties of Judaism are so intent on keeping all of the law & have differing definitions of what "the law" is, and I do know the difference between Orthodox Judaism & Reformed Judaism. Still, a high regard for the Law is a biggie for most of my Jewish friends.)

For me personally--not from a Jewish background--not being able to keep the whole law as handed down by an absolutely holy God is precisely what brought me back in my 20s to the Christian faith I had abandoned in HS. Grace (unmerited favor), in other words. With that said, it strikes me that many of us Christians focus on "doing" as opposed to focusing on "done by Christ," (Grace!) which means we miss the big E on the eye chart of the whole point of Christianity! As a Protestant, I'd love to point fingers at Catholics on this point, but we Protestants are all-too-guilty of the very same thing as our Catholic brethren. We just have a slightly different set of rules & behaviors & rituals. Again, an exercise in missing the point. To all fellow Christian rules-followers, I give you the thief on the cross. One more point: study the resurrection of Jesus. That's the linchpin. If he didn't rise from the dead, we're all wasting our time. Of course, logically, this also means that "love your neighbor" and "Judge not" are the rantings of a madman, since the same guy said he'd rise again. <end of rant about Christianity, since that's not what the thread's about>

If you want a book recommendation, I'd aim you toward Tim Keller's The Reason for God. Note: comes from a Christian perspective, & stays there; not about Judaism. But still, a nice discussion about God written for folks who are asking questions. Keller pastors a large church in New York City; he started the church in his living room ~20 years ago. Now it's filled with bright, intellectual, well-educated folks who came to faith out of utterly un-churched backgrounds. Folks of varying political persuasions, varying ethnic backgrounds, and even varying stages of belief.

I pray you a peaceful resolution to your journey. I'd suggest as a starting point, a large & expansive view of God, and then go from there. At the heart of our very humanity in my opinion/observation is an innate desire to worship. Every worldview & religion has it aimed somewhere: Jesus, a set of rules, Nature, Mohammed, Buddha, the pantheon of gods in Hinduism...or even the awesomeness of human intellect. We're inveterate worshippers. So start by asking, "is the object of my worship worthy of my worship?"


Godspeed! (literally!)
 

Probius

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Mar 19, 2004
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Research it carefully. Keeping the whole law is VERY tough, at best! (I recognize that not all varieties of Judaism are so intent on keeping all of the law & have differing definitions of what "the law" is, and I do know the difference between Orthodox Judaism & Reformed Judaism. Still, a high regard for the Law is a biggie for most of my Jewish friends.)

For me personally--not from a Jewish background--not being able to keep the whole law as handed down by an absolutely holy God is precisely what brought me back in my 20s to the Christian faith I had abandoned in HS. Grace (unmerited favor), in other words. With that said, it strikes me that many of us Christians focus on "doing" as opposed to focusing on "done by Christ," (Grace!) which means we miss the big E on the eye chart of the whole point of Christianity! As a Protestant, I'd love to point fingers at Catholics on this point, but we Protestants are all-too-guilty of the very same thing as our Catholic brethren. We just have a slightly different set of rules & behaviors & rituals. Again, an exercise in missing the point. To all fellow Christian rules-followers, I give you the thief on the cross. One more point: study the resurrection of Jesus. That's the linchpin. If he didn't rise from the dead, we're all wasting our time. Of course, logically, this also means that "love your neighbor" and "Judge not" are the rantings of a madman, since the same guy said he'd rise again. <end of rant about Christianity, since that's not what the thread's about>

If you want a book recommendation, I'd aim you toward Tim Keller's The Reason for God. Note: comes from a Christian perspective, & stays there; not about Judaism. But still, a nice discussion about God written for folks who are asking questions. Keller pastors a large church in New York City; he started the church in his living room ~20 years ago. Now it's filled with bright, intellectual, well-educated folks who came to faith out of utterly un-churched backgrounds. Folks of varying political persuasions, varying ethnic backgrounds, and even varying stages of belief.

I pray you a peaceful resolution to your journey. I'd suggest as a starting point, a large & expansive view of God, and then go from there. At the heart of our very humanity in my opinion/observation is an innate desire to worship. Every worldview & religion has it aimed somewhere: Jesus, a set of rules, Nature, Mohammed, Buddha, the pantheon of gods in Hinduism...or even the awesomeness of human intellect. We're inveterate worshippers. So start by asking, "is the object of my worship worthy of my worship?"


Godspeed! (literally!)
Thanks for your perspective. I know the law must be hard to keep, but i am more concerned about the truth. I don't know how I can keep going on as a Christian if I don't believe in Jesus. I don't know anything about the different strains of Judaism, however. You say that you could not keep the whole law, but are not from a Jewish background. I don't understand. Did you try to keep the Torah as a non Jew?
 

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