Deadline for Season

Tideflyer

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Dec 14, 2011
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There’s been so much kicked around, confusing dates, etc,etc. that I might have missed it, but a date for a season decision has to be out there somewhere. Anybody care to speculate?
 

davefrat

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Jun 4, 2002
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There’s been so much kicked around, confusing dates, etc,etc. that I might have missed it, but a date for a season decision has to be out there somewhere. Anybody care to speculate?
idk about dates, but with the explosion in Covid cases as of late (and Fauci's warning that we could hit 100k new cases a day if we don't clamp down) playing football in the fall is looking more and more unrealistic.
 

BamaNation

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Apr 9, 1999
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I think we have football. But I think we end up having some conferences sit out the season.

We may play LSU, UT and Auburn 2x each -- but I think we have SEC Football, at least!
Give me these 2x every year instead of the johnny-come-lately schools! Can you imagine the excitement this would have the potential to generate every year? Might be incredibly tough for any team to make it through the gauntlet undefeated so I give it -423% chance of being implemented! But I 100% like your outside-the-box thinking.
 

BamaMoon

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Apr 1, 2004
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I'll say again that I think "football" falls in the financial category of being "essential." Obviously I don't mean it's something we can't live without, but it has such a huge financial impact on schools, towns and businesses that I think it falls into a category that we proceed but use mitigation.

"Shutting down" huge parts of the economy is probably not coming back and moving forward with smart social distancing/mask-wearing steps is about the only approach that makes sense when there is no cure/vaccine on the immediate horizon. Mitigate to the best of our ability and move forward.

There will be teams who get impacted by it...it will be a big part of the season, but I think the season will go on because of $$$.
 

Tideflyer

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About the only thing I`m truly sure of is that because of those greenbacks that are involved, no time, effort or expense will be spared when it comes to trying to figure out a way to have a season! Much midnight oil will be burned if necessary!
 
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jabcmb

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Feb 1, 2006
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Replace the stadium led lights with ultraviolet lights. It could be like one giant decontamination venue when we play TN, au, or lswho.
I wish that didn’t have to be in blue. Number of reasons that couldn’t work, of course (examples being impact on eyesight and the fact the light couldn’t reach inside the body), but smart people brainstorming crazier suggestions have developed some miraculous ideas. That’s likely being done at some level now. Or is it? Cleaning up 100,000 people at a time sounds like a very human solution. Well, back to reality.
 
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The Elephant

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Jul 3, 2020
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I'll say again that I think "football" falls in the financial category of being "essential." Obviously I don't mean it's something we can't live without, but it has such a huge financial impact on schools, towns and businesses that I think it falls into a category that we proceed but use mitigation.

"Shutting down" huge parts of the economy is probably not coming back and moving forward with smart social distancing/mask-wearing steps is about the only approach that makes sense when there is no cure/vaccine on the immediate horizon. Mitigate to the best of our ability and move forward.

There will be teams who get impacted by it...it will be a big part of the season, but I think the season will go on because of $$$.
I agree with this sentiment. People have this conception that Sports are non-essential and we should not play them.

The cases will need to go down, but if cases keep going up and hospitalizations stay relatively low (they will go up, but most of the country has capacity) then we should have a season.

Also not having a season is not going to protect players if campuses are still open. Kids will be bored, and they will party and not social distance. That is a real consideration.

If campuses are open, football should be played. If no football, then you really have to close campuses. Do schools really want to do that?
 
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4Q Basket Case

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Nov 8, 2004
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Money will definitely come into play.

But the sentiment that games will be played because too many powerful governmental institutions and private enterprises lose too much money if there are no games, leaves out a tremendous potential cost — liability.

An otherwise healthy fan, with no co-morbidities, gets COVID on a game day, and dies.

An OL who has always struggled with weight and conditioning goes on a ventilator, develops pulmonary scarring, and can’t walk 10 steps without oxygen. Najee Harris or Dylan Moses get permanently reduced lung function and go from top NFL draft choices to personal trainers.

What would their earning potential have been? And what are appropriate punitive damages to prevent UA, the SEC, and the NCAA from allowing this sort of thing in the future?

Your fingers are going to cramp up typing all those numbers into a calculation of appropriate compensation.

It takes just one tragedy, and no foolin’ money comes into play....money that makes a TV contract, Tide Pride fees, and ticket revenue look like my pocket change.

And those “waivers” I hear about requiring players to sign? Absent legislative immunity being enacted on this specific topic, they’d be about as enforceable as those “Stay Back 200 Feet. Not Responsible for Damage” signs you see on rock trucks.

Given the predominant ethnic makeup of most college football teams, and given the current political climate, what do you think the odds of such legislation actually coming to pass are?

I think they’re roughly the same as me dunking a basketball in Kevin Durant’s face, and making him like it.

Yes, money will come into play. Just not the way a lot of people think.

I sincerely hope I’m overstating the case. But I don’t think so, and therefore don’t foresee football in the fall of 2020.
 

Padreruf

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Feb 12, 2001
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Money will definitely come into play.

But the sentiment that games will be played because too many powerful governmental institutions and private enterprises lose too much money if there are no games, leaves out a tremendous potential cost — liability.

An otherwise healthy fan, with no co-morbidities, gets COVID on a game day, and dies.

An OL who has always struggled with weight and conditioning goes on a ventilator, develops pulmonary scarring, and can’t walk 10 steps without oxygen. Najee Harris or Dylan Moses get permanently reduced lung function and go from top NFL draft choices to personal trainers.

What would their earning potential have been? And what are appropriate punitive damages to prevent UA, the SEC, and the NCAA from allowing this sort of thing in the future?

Your fingers are going to cramp up typing all those numbers into a calculation of appropriate compensation.

It takes just one tragedy, and no foolin’ money comes into play....money that makes a TV contract, Tide Pride fees, and ticket revenue look like my pocket change.

And those “waivers” I hear about requiring players to sign? Absent legislative immunity being enacted on this specific topic, they’d be about as enforceable as those “Stay Back 200 Feet. Not Responsible for Damage” signs you see on rock trucks.

Given the predominant ethnic makeup of most college football teams, and given the current political climate, what do you think the odds of such legislation actually coming to pass are?

I think they’re roughly the same as me dunking a basketball in Kevin Durant’s face, and making him like it.

Yes, money will come into play. Just not the way a lot of people think.

I sincerely hope I’m overstating the case. But I don’t think so, and therefore don’t foresee football in the fall of 2020.
I'm now thinking it will be in the Spring...which will wreak havoc with the traditional spring sports. But, since CFB pays the bills...
 

DogPatch

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Dec 4, 2018
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I'm now thinking it will be in the Spring...which will wreak havoc with the traditional spring sports. But, since CFB pays the bills...
I just can't see how they can play a spring season, then, after only a 2 or 3 month break, have a fall season. And that doesn't even take into account the conflict with the NCAA's other cash cow, the basketball tournament.
 

KrAzY3

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leaves out a tremendous potential cost — liability.
I honestly have trouble, assuming laws and guidelines are followed, differentiating between the liability here and the with any other illness.

Yes, the death rates are high, but from what I've seen those estimates have been moved down. It's still deadlier than the flu, but the flu has killed in the neighborhood of 50K people a year, several years and did that shut down organized sports? Did Alabama get sued when someone went to a game and got sick and died? I'm sure it's happened at some point.

In this case, the statistics are abundantly clear that if you are perfectly healthy the chance of dying is still extremely low, very much so. If you're at risk, I'd have to assume you are aware of the consequences when you choose to be around any crowd of people. So, once again not downplaying the seriousness of this, but from a legal standpoint I fail to grasp why getting sick and dying from something else you contracted at a game wouldn't pose an equal liability risk.

Or does awareness of this issue open the floodgates in the future for any sickness contracted? Will from here on out people be liable if everyone isn't wearing masks, practicing social distancing, and so on?
 
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