Firefighters Set Up A Ladder To Help Raccoons Escape Warehouse Fire

Bazza

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https://www.sunnyskyz.com/good-news/3423/Firefighters-Set-Up-A-Ladder-To-Help-Raccoons-Escape-Warehouse-Fire

Firefighters in Indiana helped two raccoons safely escape a warehouse fire and it was all captured on video.

The South Bend Fire Department was busy putting out a large warehouse fire when they noticed two raccoons trapped on top of the building.
A couple of quick-thinking firefighters set up a ladder in hopes that the raccoons would use them to escape.
Paul Bierwagen captured footage of the raccoons climbing down the ladder to safety as people cheered in the background.

 

TIDE-HSV

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Have to agree I don't like them. I have battled them twice where we live now. They can be bad news.
They caused so much damage that, for a while, I was trapping and killing them on a regular basis. The ones we have now aren't, at least so far. They hang out here because they like our 3 acres of woods and leave every night to go eat from neighbors' garbage cans. (Our lids are bungeed down.) Then, they return. So long as they do that, I don't bother them. These have gotten smart enough that they don't drag the bags out of the cans any more, just climb in. One friend was convinced they weren't eating his garbage any more, until he looked in his can...
 
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TIDE-HSV

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Whats so wild about them is I have seen one climb a brick wall. Their ability to climb is one of the things that makes a raccoon such a pest.
That and their strength is unreal. They didn't like my attempts to bar them from the attic, so they just took the heavy aluminum frame around a roof window and just bent it back. It would have been difficult to do with a crowbar...
 

TIDE-HSV

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You sure it was a raccoon? :D

I honestly think the adults are stronger than a human. The flashing actually had tooth marks which no human ever had. She was determined to get back to her nest site in the attic she'd occupied the year before. They have been known to simply go straight down through the shingles and decking, making an access hole...
 

Bazza

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I honestly think the adults are stronger than a human. The flashing actually had tooth marks which no human ever had. She was determined to get back to her nest site in the attic she'd occupied the year before. They have been known to simply go straight down through the shingles and decking, making an access hole...
No doubt. I'll try to post a pic later, but I have found in my yard several marrow bones (the ones you get for your dog to chew on) that are scored with teeth marks all over - very Jurassic in appearance. Always wondered what type of animal was responsible for those. Maybe raccoons (?) There are also reportedly Coyotes in our area, although I've never seen any myself.
 

TIDE-HSV

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No doubt. I'll try to post a pic later, but I have found in my yard several marrow bones (the ones you get for your dog to chew on) that are scored with teeth marks all over - very Jurassic in appearance. Always wondered what type of animal was responsible for those. Maybe raccoons (?) There are also reportedly Coyotes in our area, although I've never seen any myself.
I think coyotes are now ubiquitous in the SE. The issue is really density now. I'm surrounded on my mountaintop by thousands of acres of protected woodland, so I have a high density of both deer and coyotes, or, more probably, coy-dogs. All that said, the most probably bone-attacker was a coon...
 

Bazza

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I think coyotes are now ubiquitous in the SE. The issue is really density now. I'm surrounded on my mountaintop by thousands of acres of protected woodland, so I have a high density of both deer and coyotes, or, more probably, coy-dogs. All that said, the most probably bone-attacker was a coon...
You are probably right.

Here is a pic of one of the bones from earlier this year. I've found a couple more since.

 

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