Indonesia plane crash: All 189 passengers presumed dead in latest aviation disaster (Oct 2018)

Bamaro

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FWIW
President Donald Trump on Tuesday nominated the former Delta Air Lines executive Steve Dickson as the permanent head of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).
The Wall Street Journal first reported that the White House intended to nominate Dickson for the role as early as Tuesday.
The FAA has not had a permanent leader since former FAA Administrator Michael Huerta left the role in January 2018.
 

NationalTitles17

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https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/20/business/boeing-justice-department-subpoenas/index.html

US Justice Department prosecutors have issued multiple subpoenas as part of an investigation into Boeing's Federal Aviation Administration certification and marketing of 737 Max planes, sources briefed on the matter told CNN.The criminal investigation, which is in its early stages, began after the October 2018 crash of a 737 Max aircraft operated by Lion Air in Indonesia, the sources said. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao on Tuesday asked the agency's inspector general to investigate the Max certification.
Criminal investigators have sought information from Boeing on safety and certification procedures, including training manuals for pilots, along with how the company marketed the new aircraft, the sources said.
It's not yet clear what possible criminal laws could be at issue in the probe. Among the things the investigators are looking into is the process by which Boeing itself certified the plane as safe, and the data it presented the FAA about that self-certification, the sources said.

The FBI Seattle office and Justice Department's criminal division in Washington are leading the investigation.
 

92tide

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i guess this goes here

Trump’s top Pentagon official is now under an ethics investigation
Did Trump’s defense secretary favor Boeing? The Pentagon’s watchdog wants to find out.


Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan is under investigation by the Pentagon’s internal watchdog for allegedly boosting his former company, Boeing, while on the job.

In a Wednesday statement, the Department of Defense inspector general said it “decided to investigate complaints we recently received,” which might show that Shanahan acted “in violation of ethics rules.”
 

jthomas666

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...And Boeing takes another shot to the groin...

Doomed Boeing Jets Lacked 2 Safety Features That Company Sold Only as Extras

[The MCAS] software system takes readings from two vanelike devices called angle of attack sensors that determine how much the plane’s nose is pointing up or down relative to oncoming air. When MCAS detects that the plane is pointing up at a dangerous angle, it can automatically push down the nose of the plane in an effort to prevent the plane from stalling.Boeing’s optional safety features, in part, could have helped the pilots detect any erroneous readings. One of the optional upgrades, the angle of attack indicator, displays the readings of the two sensors. The other, called a disagree light, is activated if those sensors are at odds with one another.
Unbelievable.

Oh, Boeing has announced they they are going to make these two features standard.
 

CharminTide

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Boeing’s optional safety features, in part, could have helped the pilots detect any erroneous readings. One of the optional upgrades, the angle of attack indicator, displays the readings of the two sensors. The other, called a disagree light, is activated if those sensors are at odds with one another.
You're freaking kidding me.
 

Elefantman

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Last month an Atlas Boeing 767 crashed in Texas but it's not MSM headline news because only three pilots died. READ THIS

While the NTSB had initially stated that the aircraft had pitched down “in response to column input”, it subsequently revised this, saying the downward pitch was the result of “nose-down elevator deflection” – an amendment designed to avoid premature conclusions being drawn over the relation, if any, between actions in the cockpit and the unusual attitude of the aircraft.Although the initial use of the term “column input” might suggest there was a nose-down command of some degree, the NTSB has not clarified the extent of any pressure placed on the yoke – or the reason – nor whether the elevator deflection was in line with the command.
But the extraordinary transition to a 49° nose-down pitch, which took place over 18s, is central to the inquiry. The NTSB has not specified whether the aircraft was in cloud at the time of the transition, but it had clearly emerged from the cloud base into good visibility during the last few seconds of its descent.With investigators yet to establish conclusively whether there is a connection between control column movements and the aircraft’s excessive nose-down attitude, the possibility of a mechanical reason for the elevator deflection is yet to be ruled out.
This accident maybe another pilot/automation interface issue. The plane did something unexpected and the pilot was not trained to handle the deviation from normal flight created by the automated system.
 

NationalTitles17

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Last month an Atlas Boeing 767 crashed in Texas but it's not MSM headline news because only three pilots died. READ THIS





This accident maybe another pilot/automation interface issue. The plane did something unexpected and the pilot was not trained to handle the deviation from normal flight created by the automated system.
Could be a true case of runaway trim. Tragic in any case.
 

Bamaro

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...And Boeing takes another shot to the groin...

Doomed Boeing Jets Lacked 2 Safety Features That Company Sold Only as Extras

Unbelievable.

Oh, Boeing has announced they they are going to make these two features standard.
Remember its the on the airlines too. They had the option to included these 2 safety features and decided not to pay the extra money. Just like with cars today. There are many accident avoidance systems available at extra cost on some models but people choose not to pay the extra money. I have heard that American has these features on their planes. Not sure if Southwest does also.
 

crimsonaudio

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It's unfortunate that our military-industrial complex ensures Boeing will get out of this nightmare just fine.
And investors know it - any other company (not propped up by said MI complex) would have tanked hard at this point, yet the stock remains 25% higher than it was in mid-December of 2018...

BA stock.png
 

jthomas666

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Remember its the on the airlines too. They had the option to included these 2 safety features and decided not to pay the extra money. Just like with cars today. There are many accident avoidance systems available at extra cost on some models but people choose not to pay the extra money. I have heard that American has these features on their planes. Not sure if Southwest does also.
You're correct, but at the same time, i gotta wonder how hard Boeing pushed those options. "Oh, these sensors monitor the plane's angle of attack, and will push the nose down if it senses a stall situation. We just thought you might like to keep a weather eye on them--it's certainly not because the major redesign that we've maintained is not a major redesign might affect the plane's attitude. Hey, look at the redesigned cup holders!" As an aside, there's a reason I've never gone into sales. :)

Now, Lion Air definitely has some 'splainin' to do, given that the day before their crash, that very flight had the same problem--the crew only recovered because another pilot familiar with the problem was deadheading on the flight, and he told the crew how to disable the malfunctioning system.
 

TIDE-HSV

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You're correct, but at the same time, i gotta wonder how hard Boeing pushed those options. "Oh, these sensors monitor the plane's angle of attack, and will push the nose down if it senses a stall situation. We just thought you might like to keep a weather eye on them--it's certainly not because the major redesign that we've maintained is not a major redesign might affect the plane's attitude. Hey, look at the redesigned cup holders!" As an aside, there's a reason I've never gone into sales. :)

Now, Lion Air definitely has some 'splainin' to do, given that the day before their crash, that very flight had the same problem--the crew only recovered because another pilot familiar with the problem was deadheading on the flight, and he told the crew how to disable the malfunctioning system.
It makes you wonder how many other near-disasters we've avoided which will never come to light. BTW, it's my opinion that safety features related to a new system should never be an "option." It turns out the US airlines which bought the plane "opted" to purchase the two-sensor "option." All except for United, which cheaped out. No word yet on overseas discount airlines, but I'll bet that most, like Lion, opted out for cost reasons. I wouldn't be greatly surprised if prosecutions don't eventually result from this entire fiasco...