June 27, 1984: let the televised games begin!

utjughead

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We’re close to the anniversary of an epic day for college football. For those who recall televised college football in the 1970’s and early 1980’s, you may remember watching only one game each weekend. I guess the whole nation watched the same game together. New Year’s Day in that era was sensory overload - watching 4 games in the same day!

On June 27, 1984, the US Supreme Court issued a decision essentially undoing the NCAA’s stranglehold on televising college football games. Schools enjoyed the freedom to negotiate their own TV deals. The number of televised games definitely elevated after that. These days, I think almost every SEC game is televised each week, be it at Noon, 3:30, 4, 6, 7:30 or 9. Some of us likely grumble about getting one time slot as opposed to another slot, but that is a far better dilemma than one game total for the whole day.
 

Elefantman

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This just made me think about young Bama fans who never attended a game without TV time outs or instant replay. The game was so much better to watch or listen to on the radio back then. To think a team could punt the ball and the other team would be lined up to snap the ball within a minute.
 

Elefantman

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Let's face it. Everything has changed due to TV. Football went from a spectator sport to a televised entertainment product. Let's not forget what the "E" in ESPN stands for. Rules were changed to make it more entertaining for the TV audience. Defense would win championships but it didn't help ratings. Now 40 years latter, we have high scoring games and 12 team playoffs. All thanks to the "E" in ESPN
 
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selmaborntidefan

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Let's face it. Everything has changed due to TV. Football went from a spectator sport to a televised entertainment product. Let's not forget what the "E" in ESPN stands for. Rules were changed to make it more entertaining for the TV audience. Defense would win championships but it didn't help ratings. Now 40 years latter, we have high scoring games and 12 team playoffs. All thanks to the "E" in ESPN
Well, I guess we can blame ESPN but TV is an expensive product that someone had to sponsor. And the new pass rules (well, in the NFL anyway) came in a year prior to ESPN even launching.

I'd say CTE has caused a bunch of the issue with this flag football nonsense that is the Big 12. But it's kind of like what I was saying about the bowl games.

You're either married or single - there's no in between.

You either have meaningful bowl games or a playoff.

You either have games televised or you don't.
 

mdb-tpet

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The last game I watched without TV timeouts was the Northern Illinois game, and it was jarring how fast that game played out, and for the worse of course.
 

BamaMoon

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True, and I don’t deny advertising extended the games.

But there weren’t anywhere near as many pass plays back then, either. Or points scored.
Also, if I'm not mistaken, the "out of bounds" rule/clock stopping was different then too. Now the clock runs more but the games last longer. The result? We basically get less game time but more advertising time.
 
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Elefantman

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Pandora's box has been opened and there is no going back. College football is addicted to TV revenue. TV has gone from broadcasting the game to molding the product to attract more viewers. I like the way the guys at SEC Shorts illustrated it last year with their playoff selection video. When it came down to picking aTm or ND, ESPN throws the water balloon at aTm because no one would watch them in a rematch with Alabama.
 
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4Q Basket Case

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In the 1970s, games were shorter in part because so many teams ran the wishbone or veer. If both teams in a given game ran that style of offense, it wasn’t impossible to see entire quarters played in less than 30 minutes. The lack of TV timeouts also played in, but the style of the game was a bigger factor.

Related front: I remember in being out on the playground at Tuscaloosa Junior High when the Goodyear blimp went right overhead on the way to the next day’s game at Legion Field. It was like in a movie….everybody stopped whatever they were doing and just looked up with mouths agape. Even those who were in the building in class rushed to the windows and stuck their heads out to see.
 

selmaborntidefan

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In the 1970s, games were shorter in part because so many teams ran the wishbone or veer. If both teams in a given game ran that style of offense, it wasn’t impossible to see entire quarters played in less than 30 minutes. The lack of TV timeouts also played in, but the style of the game was a bigger factor.
- running was 80% of the game
- there was no overtime
- the defense was not permitted to advance a fumble
- kicking was not as specialized
- the out of bounds play required the QB to take the snap and not "intentionally ground" but throw the ball out of bounds (this was changed to the spike play in 1990, which is part of what caused the Fifth Down mess)
 
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TiderJack

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Let's face it. Everything has changed due to TV. Football went from a spectator sport to a televised entertainment product. Let's not forget what the "E" in ESPN stands for. Rules were changed to make it more entertaining for the TV audience. Defense would win championships but it didn't help ratings. Now 40 years latter, we have high scoring games and 12 team playoffs. All thanks to the "E" in ESPN
Agreed and the biggest change is the bank accounts of each of our universities.
 

TiderJack

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- running was 80% of the game
- there was no overtime
- the defense was not permitted to advance a fumble
- kicking was not as specialized
- the out of bounds play required the QB to take the snap and not "intentionally ground" but throw the ball out of bounds (this was changed to the spike play in 1990, which is part of what caused the Fifth Down mess)
Fairly certain defenses could advance a fumble if it was behind the line of scrimmage and the ball never touched the ground.
 

Redwood Forrest

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- running was 80% of the game
- there was no overtime
- the defense was not permitted to advance a fumble
- kicking was not as specialized
- the out of bounds play required the QB to take the snap and not "intentionally ground" but throw the ball out of bounds (this was changed to the spike play in 1990, which is part of what caused the Fifth Down mess)
I may be wrong (again, lord I hate getting old) but I seem to remember the receiver had to have both feet in bounds instead of just dragging one.
 

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