NCAA recommends removal of standardized test scores for racial equity

tattooguy21

All-American
Aug 14, 2012
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Thoughts? Since I don't believe in equity, I'm out. No more a fan of this than Yale and other schools having higher requirements for Asians to get in vs other races.

I guess my issue is the same one I've had in other areas, most recently military physical fitness standards......when a group can't meet the standard, lower the standard. I was raised different. Rise to the challenge. That's no longer socially acceptable I guess.

 

4Q Basket Case

FB|BB Moderator
Nov 8, 2004
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Thoughts? Since I don't believe in equity, I'm out. No more a fan of this than Yale and other schools having higher requirements for Asians to get in vs other races.

I guess my issue is the same one I've had in other areas, most recently military physical fitness standards......when a group can't meet the standard, lower the standard. I was raised different. Rise to the challenge. That's no longer socially acceptable I guess.

I agree with you. I also think that the world thinks that it has passed us by.

“It’s too HAAARRRD!” has ceased to be a whine and become a justification.

Of course, I’m old, white, male, Southern, blue-eyed, and retired. I used to have tow-head blond hair, though it’s gray now.

Forgive me, but my opinion is colored by privilege that I can’t possibly ever live down or un-learn. Pay no mind. Nothing to see here.
 

Ole Man Dan

Hall of Fame
Apr 21, 2008
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Thoughts? Since I don't believe in equity, I'm out. No more a fan of this than Yale and other schools having higher requirements for Asians to get in vs other races.

I guess my issue is the same one I've had in other areas, most recently military physical fitness standards......when a group can't meet the standard, lower the standard. I was raised different. Rise to the challenge. That's no longer socially acceptable I guess.

AS A FORMER TEACHER I FOUGHT AGAINST THE IDEA OF DIFFERENT STROKES FOR DIFFERENT FOLKS.
 

Padreruf

Hall of Fame
Feb 12, 2001
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The shame of this is that it will not help those whose test scores are lower...the message it sends is that you don't have to do the work in school in order to be eligible. I get their reasoning that test scores show a racial (more economic) bias. I don't see how lowering them is going to help...it will just take away the need to work harder.
 

Jon

Hall of Fame
Feb 22, 2002
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Thoughts? Since I don't believe in equity, I'm out. No more a fan of this than Yale and other schools having higher requirements for Asians to get in vs other races.

I guess my issue is the same one I've had in other areas, most recently military physical fitness standards......when a group can't meet the standard, lower the standard. I was raised different. Rise to the challenge. That's no longer socially acceptable I guess.

this is about the endless march towards college athletics becoming a semi-pro farm league and nothing more. This isn't being done for some social justice reason, the social justice angle is cover to get more people eligible. This is about money, period
 

4Q Basket Case

FB|BB Moderator
Nov 8, 2004
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This.

It's literally why we chose to home school our kids - and the difference in the level of their education, even compared to the highly-ranked private schools around here - is astonishing.
Congratulations on truly committing to your children’s education. It takes a level of involvement that most parents might talk about, but won’t commit to. Especially not over a period of 12 years. Well done!

I don’t know how old your kids are, but when they have children of their own, they will hold you and Mrs. CA in even higher regard than they already do.

I’m curious —
1. How did you teach more specialized subjects? I had trigonometry, calculus, chemistry and physics in high school — and it was tough. Especially in math, I didn’t see anything in college that I hadn’t seen in high school until I was more than halfway through the second college calculus. But there’s no way I could have taught any of that stuff when I was of an age to have 16-18 year old kids

2. Also less-quantifiable stuff, like literature? While I loved Catcher in the Rye and even The Scarlet Letter (I was strange that way), I don’t think I could teach either.

3. How did you handle the social aspects? Working and playing with others, and later, dating. Learning to respect and deal people different from yourself, and learning where to draw the line when “different” crosses over into “not morally right.”

While I share your opinion of schools’ academic preparation, I’m not sure what the substitute for social development is.
 

crimsonaudio

Administrator
Staff member
Sep 9, 2002
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Congratulations on truly committing to your children’s education. It takes a level of involvement that most parents might talk about, but won’t commit to. Especially not over a period of 12 years. Well done!
It's not / wasn't easy, but when you see their academic success it's 100% worth it.

1. How did you teach more specialized subjects? I had trigonometry, calculus, chemistry and physics in high school — and it was tough. Especially in math, I didn’t see anything in college that I hadn’t seen in high school until I was more than halfway through the second college calculus. But there’s no way I could have taught any of that stuff when I was of an age to have 16-18 year old kids
We taught them until they pushed our limits. My wife is a grammar ninja and I had two years of calculus in HS, plus more in college. That said, I stopped teaching them math after Algebra II and relied on hired guns (professional tutors) to handle it.

That's what we did in all subjects - handle what we feel like we have a handle on, then fall back on professionals (1:1, not classes) to make sure they received the best education they could.

I'm a firm believer that 1:1 teaching is far better than any situation with multiple kids and one teacher. Our children could rocket through a subject they easily understood then hit the brakes and loiter for as long as needed to completely grasp a subject before moving on. Moving at the 'average speed of the class' is hard on everyone except the average.

2. Also less-quantifiable stuff, like literature? While I loved Catcher in the Rye and even The Scarlet Letter (I was strange that way), I don’t think I could teach either.
Partially via tutoring (there are tons of options in that regard) as well as curriculum (both online and physical). Homeschooling was more difficult 20 years ago but there are tons of options now for parents.

3. How did you handle the social aspects? Working and playing with others, and later, dating. Learning to respect and deal people different from yourself, and learning where to draw the line when “different” crosses over into “not morally right.”
This one is easy - much easier than people tend to assume. Our kids are quite social, well-adapted, not at all the 'typical home school kid' that people tend to picture (socially awkward, etc). In fact, most of the public HS kids I meet are far more awkward than they were.

We didn't home school them to shelter them, we did it to give them the best education possible, so they have rich social lives.
 

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