Link: Opting out in college games has now made it to HS sports

Bamabuzzard

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This isn't football but is somewhat related in that the high school pitcher and MLB prospect in this article, is "opting out" of the rest of his HS games, which includes the playoffs. I can almost guess with great certainty his team doesn't have another pitcher even in the same stratosphere as him so they will potentially have to go into the playoffs without the pitcher that played a big role in getting them there. As a former athlete and competitor, I struggle with this a lot.

 

Tidewater

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This isn't football but is somewhat related in that the high school pitcher and MLB prospect in this article, is "opting out" of the rest of his HS games, which includes the playoffs. I can almost guess with great certainty his team doesn't have another pitcher even in the same stratosphere as him so they will potentially have to go into the playoffs without the pitcher that played a big role in getting them there. As a former athlete and competitor, I struggle with this a lot.

I think that the chances of career-ending injury are a lot less than in a college football bowl game (but still not zero).
 
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JohnD

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Maybe he wants to make sure his backups get to play. Or maybe his coach is a jerk. I could see that.
 

Tug Tide

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I keep up with FL prep pitching pretty regularly and was wondering why he wasn’t among the state leaders in several stats.
Turns out he finished his season avg a walk or hit batter every 3 innings.
He’s still going to be a top of the draft selection
 

CB4

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The risk for kids in high school baseball these days really begins years earlier. It starts with kids “specializing” at age 11 or 12. It is the kid that plays baseball almost “year round”- a regular spring schedule, then summer league and the fall league. The kid that is pitching and then plays a position in the field the second game of a doubleheader or the next day’s game….and the next…and the next. And then back on the mound. They are experiencing “overuse” wear and tear even BEFORE they make the high school team.

I’ll never forget being at the Hoover Met for the SEC Baseball Tournament years ago with my son. There was a young man seated in front of us with his left arm stretched out behind his father’s back. On his left elbow was the noticeable scar. I whispered to my son “looks like Tommy John surgery….” His father overheard me and said “yep Andrews did his surgery back in the fall. He was pitching this past fall as a college freshman (named the school) and it blew out. Dr. Andrews said it was the epitome of over use he sees in teenagers these days. His ulnar collateral ligament looked like he was 30 years old…not 19 years old.”

His father continued “The dumbest thing I ever did was let him play baseball eight months out of a year from the time he was twelve years old. And when he wasn’t on the mound throwing 80 or more pitches in a game, he was playing first base or the outfield. His arm never rested. I’m the parent. I should have known better”.

Think you have a kid that has “potential” to play at the next level? Do your kid a favor. Opt him out of the extra play in the summer and fall leagues BEFORE he gets to high school. That way there is less concern about injury when he’s playing a playoff game with his high school teammates THAT ACTUALLY MEANS SOMETHING.
 
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Tug Tide

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The risk for kids in high school baseball these days really begins years earlier. It starts with kids “specializing” at age 11 or 12. It is the kid that plays baseball almost “year round”- a regular spring schedule, then summer league and the fall league. The kid that is pitching and then plays a position in the field the second game of a doubleheader or the next day’s game….and the next…and the next. And then back on the mound. They are experiencing “overuse” wear and tear even BEFORE they make the high school team.

I’ll never forget being at the Hoover Met for the SEC Baseball Tournament years ago with my son. There was a young man seated in front of us with with his left arm stretched out behind his father’s back. On his left elbow was the noticeable scar. I whispered to my son “looks like Tommy John surgery….” His father overheard me and said “yep Andrews did his surgery back in the fall. He was pitching this past fall as a college freshman (named the school) and it blew out. Dr. Andrews said it was the epitome of over use he sees in teenagers these days. His ulnar collateral ligament looked like he was 30 years old…not 19 years old.”

His father continued “The dumbest thing I ever did was let him play baseball eight months out of a year from the time he was twelve years old. And when he wasn’t on the mound throwing 80 or more pitches in a game, he was playing first base or the outfield. His arm never rested. I’m the parent. I should have known better”.

Think you have a kid that has “potential” to play at the next level? Do your kid a favor. Opt him out of the extra play in the summer and fall leagues BEFORE he gets to high school. That way there is less concern about injury when he playing a playoff game with his high school teammates THAT ACTUALLY MEANS SOMETHING.
Son just graduated HS a couple weeks ago and is headed to a FL JUCO. He’s enjoying his first summer “off” in quite a while. It’s good to see him doing more of the other stuff he loves, like fishing
 

Crimson1967

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Article said the kid will pitch at Vandy if he doesn’t go pro. I wonder if he will stay behind if the team goes to Omaha so he doesn’t risk his arm.
 
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CB4

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Son just graduated HS a couple weeks ago and is headed to a FL JUCO. He’s enjoying his first summer “off” in quite a while. It’s good to see him doing more of the other stuff he loves, like fishing
My son played baseball in high school and American Legion baseball in the summer between his junior and senior years. He was a pitcher and middle infielder. That was the only “extra baseball” he ever played. He played football in the fall but in most cases he didn’t pick up a baseball from late April/May until January/February of the following year.
And he pitched a bunch. And never experienced any arm issues.
 

81usaf92

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The risk for kids in high school baseball these days really begins years earlier. It starts with kids “specializing” at age 11 or 12. It is the kid that plays baseball almost “year round”- a regular spring schedule, then summer league and the fall league. The kid that is pitching and then plays a position in the field the second game of a doubleheader or the next day’s game….and the next…and the next. And then back on the mound. They are experiencing “overuse” wear and tear even BEFORE they make the high school team.

I’ll never forget being at the Hoover Met for the SEC Baseball Tournament years ago with my son. There was a young man seated in front of us with his left arm stretched out behind his father’s back. On his left elbow was the noticeable scar. I whispered to my son “looks like Tommy John surgery….” His father overheard me and said “yep Andrews did his surgery back in the fall. He was pitching this past fall as a college freshman (named the school) and it blew out. Dr. Andrews said it was the epitome of over use he sees in teenagers these days. His ulnar collateral ligament looked like he was 30 years old…not 19 years old.”

His father continued “The dumbest thing I ever did was let him play baseball eight months out of a year from the time he was twelve years old. And when he wasn’t on the mound throwing 80 or more pitches in a game, he was playing first base or the outfield. His arm never rested. I’m the parent. I should have known better”.

Think you have a kid that has “potential” to play at the next level? Do your kid a favor. Opt him out of the extra play in the summer and fall leagues BEFORE he gets to high school. That way there is less concern about injury when he’s playing a playoff game with his high school teammates THAT ACTUALLY MEANS SOMETHING.
Travel ball is a blessing and a curse.
 
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Bamabuzzard

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Travel ball is a blessing and a curse.
Yes, it certainly is a blessing and curse, all depending on how the parents manage it for their kid or in my case KIDS.

One thing travel baseball has done is allow more opportunities at the local league level for less talented players to get meaningful playing time and reps because the majority of the better talent no longer plays league baseball. However, the downside for those who enjoy "good" baseball, is league ball is U.G.L.Y, UGLY to watch. But if you're a parent of a kid who needs a lot of reps and may be behind in development, you're getting your money's worth in league ball.
 

AlistarWills

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Yes, it certainly is a blessing and curse, all depending on how the parents manage it for their kid or in my case KIDS.

One thing travel baseball has done is allow more opportunities at the local league level for less talented players to get meaningful playing time and reps because the majority of the better talent no longer plays league baseball. However, the downside for those who enjoy "good" baseball, is league ball is U.G.L.Y, UGLY to watch. But if you're a parent of a kid who needs a lot of reps and may be behind in development, you're getting your money's worth in league ball.
My experience with this is that you need a few of those really good kids around for those who need a lot of work, to see how it’s supposed to go. It helped my oldest to bloom when he had some kids he could throw hard as he could to, and then actually catch it.
 

AlistarWills

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I don’t like the year round baseball. Yes, all the reps does help. But you have people chasing that scholarship (what does a baseball scholarship actually cover…fees? It’s not much). People chasing the draft. I know of a kid who a couple years back, was on two travel teams in two leagues. He’d pitch on Saturday for one team and then go to the other to pitch again on Sunday. He wasn’t getting the rest because his folks wanted him to get the game reps. Either the coaches on the teams didn’t know what he was doing or didn’t care cause the kid could sling it. He graduated this year and had gotten into the low 90’s with his fastball. Got a scholarship to a 4 year in Alabama but I didn’t know the school had a baseball team till recently. Either way, the kid survived the grueling schedule. Not sure what he’s got left in his arm at this point.
 
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Bamabuzzard

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My experience with this is that you need a few of those really good kids around for those who need a lot of work, to see how it’s supposed to go. It helped my oldest to bloom when he had some kids he could throw hard as he could to, and then actually catch it.
I agree, but unfortunately, the "really good kid" doesn't get better, and more times than not gets worse. This is the reason we ultimately left league ball. Our kids were getting progressively worse and progressively uninterested in the game. The moment they got into tournament/"travel" baseball their development and interest went through the roof. However, my wife and I are VERY strict on the number of games they play in the spring. We tell our kids' coaches ahead of time, that we do not allow our kid to play over "X" amount of games. Once that number has been hit, we will play out the weekend and we're done. It's made a few very mad, but they can't say they weren't told in advance. They like playing other sports and doing other things, and we're going to let them do that.
 
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AlistarWills

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I agree, but unfortunately, the "really good kid" doesn't get better, and more times than not gets worse. This is the reason we ultimately left league ball. Our kids were getting progressively worse and progressively uninterested in the game. The moment they got into tournament/"travel" baseball their development and interest went through the roof. However, my wife and I are VERY strict on the number of games they play in the spring. We tell our kids' coaches ahead of time, that we do not allow our kid to play over "X" amount of games. Once that number has been hit, we will play out the weekend and we're done. It's made a few very mad, but they can't say they weren't told in advance. They like playing other sports and doing other things, and we're going to let them do that.
I’m glad you are setting the limits! I’ve seen numerous kids burn out because they have played so much.
Of course I have witnessed a group a parents “burn out” too. They don’t cheer for the kids at the HS level. It’s like they’ve been there done that and are just at games to socialize and take pictures and video so they can post to social media thst lil Johnny did something
 

Padreruf

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Full baseball scholarships are far and few between...like 11 1/2 per team the last I knew. If your son has talent, he will be seen at camps, etc. Travel leagues wear the kids out...as does year around baseball. Let them have a half-way normal life.
 

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