News Article: Penn St. Doc: 30-35% COVID positive Big 10 athletes have Myocarditis, symptomatic or not

MOAN

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It seems we can't have a single thread on the FB board on COVID-19 without it being completely derailed by politics.
I don't see how you can discuss one without bringing up the other when it pertains to lockdowns, shutdowns. It is certainly every day in the news and the Dems are constantly using it in their efforts to defeat Trump. Its all Trumps fault! ;)
 

Bamaro

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It seems we can't have a single thread on the FB board on COVID-19 without it being completely derailed by politics.
Since we are now on the NS board I'll say that since covid has been so totally politicised by trump, starting way back in January, lie after lie, constantly denying science/medicine, your statement is spot on. If we had a competant, mentally fit president, we would not be where we are today. Covid is not trump's fault but our poor responce to it is all on him.
 

81usaf92

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Since we are now on the NS board I'll say that since covid has been so totally politicised by trump, starting way back in January, lie after lie, constantly denying science/medicine, your statement is spot on. If we had a competant, mentally fit president, we would not be where we are today. Covid is not trump's fault but our poor responce to it is all on him.
What’s new? The national anthem protests were about over until he started politicizing it and forcing the NFL’s hand. Trump is just an agent of chaos and controversy
 
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NationalTitles18

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The worst thing (other than people getting this) about the mistake by the Penn St doc is that now people are looking at this and saying, "That's not as bad" and what they really seem to mean is that it isn't a problem when it is still a huge problem. Let's say the rate is 10% getting myocarditis. There are 460,000 college athletes according to the NCAA. If only 1/4 of them get infected and 10% of those infected develop myocarditis then that is 11,500 athletes in college sports with myocarditis. It's still quite the serious issue.




“Cell nuclei — the hubs of all the genetic information, all of the nuclear DNA — in many of the cells were gone,” McDevitt said. “There was a black hole literally where we would normally see the nuclear DNA. That’s also pretty bizarre.”

While McDevitt’s study has not yet been peer-reviewed — it is still in pre-print — he said he felt compelled to share the findings as soon as possible. He said his team also sampled tissues from three COVID-19 patient autopsies and found similar damage in the heart muscles of those patients, none of whom had been flagged for myocarditis or heart problems while they were alive.

“This is probably not the whole story yet, but we think we have insights into the beginning of when the virus would get into some of these people and what it might be doing that is concerning enough that we should probably let people know because clinicians need to be thinking about this,” McDevitt said in an interview. “We don’t have any means of bringing heart muscle back. ...This virus is [causing] a very different type of injury and one we haven't seen before.”

McDevitt said that the chopped up heart muscles he and his colleagues saw is so concerning because when the microfibers in the muscle are damaged, the heart can’t properly contract.

“If heart muscle cells are damaged and they can’t regenerate themselves, then what you’re looking at is someone who could prematurely have heart failure or heart disease due to the virus,” McDevitt said. “This could be a warning sign for a potential wave of heart disease that we could see in the future, and it’s in the survivors — that’s the concern.”

McDevitt said that he believes the risk of heart disease is serious and one people should consider as they assess their own risk of getting the coronavirus.
 
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TIDE-HSV

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The worst thing (other than people getting this) about the mistake by the Penn St doc is that now people are looking at this and saying, "That's not as bad" and what they really seem to mean is that it isn't a problem when it is still a huge problem. Let's say the rate is 10% getting myocarditis. There are 460,000 college athletes according to the NCAA. If only 1/4 of them get infected and 10% of those infected develop myocarditis then that is 11,500 athletes in college sports with myocarditis. It's still quite the serious issue.




“Cell nuclei — the hubs of all the genetic information, all of the nuclear DNA — in many of the cells were gone,” McDevitt said. “There was a black hole literally where we would normally see the nuclear DNA. That’s also pretty bizarre.”

While McDevitt’s study has not yet been peer-reviewed — it is still in pre-print — he said he felt compelled to share the findings as soon as possible. He said his team also sampled tissues from three COVID-19 patient autopsies and found similar damage in the heart muscles of those patients, none of whom had been flagged for myocarditis or heart problems while they were alive.

“This is probably not the whole story yet, but we think we have insights into the beginning of when the virus would get into some of these people and what it might be doing that is concerning enough that we should probably let people know because clinicians need to be thinking about this,” McDevitt said in an interview. “We don’t have any means of bringing heart muscle back. ...This virus is [causing] a very different type of injury and one we haven't seen before.”

McDevitt said that the chopped up heart muscles he and his colleagues saw is so concerning because when the microfibers in the muscle are damaged, the heart can’t properly contract.

“If heart muscle cells are damaged and they can’t regenerate themselves, then what you’re looking at is someone who could prematurely have heart failure or heart disease due to the virus,” McDevitt said. “This could be a warning sign for a potential wave of heart disease that we could see in the future, and it’s in the survivors — that’s the concern.”

McDevitt said that he believes the risk of heart disease is serious and one people should consider as they assess their own risk of getting the coronavirus.
That was the point I was making earlier when I was saying 15% was still a horrible situation. Heart muscle tissue is not known to regenerate, although I think it's on the horizon in the next couple of decades. As in an MI, muscle tissue is replaced by scar tissue which doesn't contribute to contractile strength. If it's severe enough, the heart goes into a downward spiral, with the remaining muscle cells trying to make up for the scar tissue burden. The end result is heart failure. 5% would be an awful problem...
 
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NationalTitles18

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That was the point I was making earlier when I was saying 15% was still a horrible situation. Heart muscle tissue is not known to regenerate, although I think it's on the horizon in the next couple of decades. As in an MI, muscle tissue is replaced by scar tissue which doesn't contribute to contractile strength. If it's severe enough, the heart goes into a downward spiral, with the remaining muscle cells trying to make up for the scar tissue burden. The end result is heart failure. 5% would be an awful problem...
We can get into all kinds of scenarios with this - full thickness vs partial thickness, endothelial damage in coronary vessels, heart valve damage, and so on. If that 10-15% number holds there is going to be a massive toll in medical costs, disability, and early death - perhaps even years after infection. IIRC the 10-15% is just for myocarditis and not pericarditis, which this virus also causes. Haven't gone back to double check the numbers.
 

TIDE-HSV

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We can get into all kinds of scenarios with this - full thickness vs partial thickness, endothelial damage in coronary vessels, heart valve damage, and so on. If that 10-15% number holds there is going to be a massive toll in medical costs, disability, and early death - perhaps even years after infection. IIRC the 10-15% is just for myocarditis and not pericarditis, which this virus also causes. Haven't gone back to double check the numbers.
I tried not to dig too far into the details. Long-term, the endothelial damage is the more insidious, IMO. It's so much harder to measure, except on autopsy...
 
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NationalTitles18

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