News Article: Scott Cochran Shares his addiction story ...

BamaLuver

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Scott Cochran Shares His Addiction Story

He first began taking painkillers, he said, as a way to deal with migraines, and eventually was crushing and snorting opiates he obtained both through prescriptions and illegally. The 45-year-old Cochran told the AJC he decided to get help after an April 2020 incident in which his wife, Cissy, found him unconscious. “She found me dead,” he says. He entered a rehab facility in Massachusetts, something only he and his wife knew about at the time. Cochran was back using shortly thereafter, however — including partaking of the powerful and dangerous painkiller, fentanyl.
 
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JDCrimson

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Im sure all that yelling contributed to his migraines. I hope he fully recovers. But I didn't get the sense from that article that he has reached his bottom yet with his addiction.
 
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Crimson1967

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Im sure all that yelling contributed to his migraines. I hope he fully recovers. But I didn't get the sense from that article that he has reached his bottom yet with his addiction.
He also had a rather demanding boss.

I hope he can get his life in order but with two relapses already I wonder.
 
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CB4

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I think it is good that Cochran is being honest about his addiction. Honesty and humility are key aspects in continued recovery.

However my concern would be, given Cochran’s recent relapses, and now involvement in a “treatment” organization so early in this period of recovery. I’ve seen far too many find the “pink cloud”, feeling they’ve got it “kicked”, and next thing you know they have relapsed or have died. This time needs to be focused on continued personal recovery with his home recovery group and support network. The time to switch the focus on helping others will come. IMO, as an addict with 20 years of recovery time under my belt (and the father of a recovering alcoholic/addict) this is risky and can easily pose a problem in continued progress. If Cochran wants to get “healthy”, he needs to be focused on himself.
 
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4Q Basket Case

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I think it is good that Cochran is being honest about his addiction. Honesty and humility are key aspects in continued recovery.

However my concern would be, given Cochran’s recent relapses, and now involvement in a “treatment” organization so early in this period of recovery. I’ve seen far too many find the “pink cloud”, feeling they’ve got it “kicked”, and next thing you know they have relapsed or have died. This time needs to be focused on continued personal recovery with his home recovery group and support network. The time to switch the focus on helping others will come. IMO, as an addict with 20 years of recovery time under my belt (and the father of a recovering alcoholic/addict) this is risky and can easily pose a problem in continued progress. If Cochran wants to get “healthy”, he needs to be focused on himself.
Great perspective, CB, and thank you.

I’m sorry for how you came to know so much about the subject, but appreciate the wisdom born of experience.
 

Padreruf

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I think it is good that Cochran is being honest about his addiction. Honesty and humility are key aspects in continued recovery.

However my concern would be, given Cochran’s recent relapses, and now involvement in a “treatment” organization so early in this period of recovery. I’ve seen far too many find the “pink cloud”, feeling they’ve got it “kicked”, and next thing you know they have relapsed or have died. This time needs to be focused on continued personal recovery with his home recovery group and support network. The time to switch the focus on helping others will come. IMO, as an addict with 20 years of recovery time under my belt (and the father of a recovering alcoholic/addict) this is risky and can easily pose a problem in continued progress. If Cochran wants to get “healthy”, he needs to be focused on himself.
From where I sit I've seen a parade of former addicts attempt this...and most of them failed. Scott, go get a real job and focus on your own recovery and your family...I'm sure they need you and your time.

Sorry to be so negative but this is a a recurring nightmare in the addiction recovery world.
 

CB4

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From where I sit I've seen a parade of former addicts attempt this...and most of them failed. Scott, go get a real job and focus on your own recovery and your family...I'm sure they need you and your time.

Sorry to be so negative but this is a a recurring nightmare in the addiction recovery world.
Thank you Padre. This isn’t negativity. It is reality. No one wishes ill towards Scott Cochran. We all pray for him and want him healthy. But like you, I’ve seen this movie time and time again. And most times in this film the hero doesn’t “ride off into the sunset”. Usually it ends with the hero getting covered up on Boot Hill.
Recovery is difficult enough doing it the right way; working a program, attending meetings, getting a sponsor, daily contemplation and introspection. Far too many times the addict begins to believe stuff like this becomes a replacement for that hard work. I personally know of three such situations; they were “fixed” and were so smart they were going to “fix” the world. One is dead now, the other two are either in prison or are bouncing in and out.
I hope someone gets in his ear about it.
 

RdunawayTX

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I’ve seen far too many find the “pink cloud”, feeling they’ve got it “kicked”, and next thing you know they have relapsed or have died. This time needs to be focused on continued personal recovery with his home recovery group and support network. The time to switch the focus on helping others will come. IMO, as an addict with 20 years of recovery time under my belt (and the father of a recovering alcoholic/addict) this is risky and can easily pose a problem in continued progress. If Cochran wants to get “healthy”, he needs to be focused on himself.
18 years sober, here, brother.

I kind of disagree with the bolded part. For some, throwing themselves into helping others is part of their recovery. The 12th step is, after all, "Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these Steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs." Perhaps Cochran has and continues to work the steps and is putting the 12th into practice in a meaningful way.

At least, that's my hope.

Like you and Padre, I've seen too many folks think they have it all figured out and become the smartest guy in the room. Those folks, inevitably, fail. And fail hard. After a few relapses, you figure out that you're actually the dumbest guy in the room and need to do things differently. My cousin did it that way. Unfortunately, he OD'd and didn't get another chance.

Maybe Cochran has found his way to do things differently.

Fingers crossed that he has.
 

CB4

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18 years sober, here, brother.

I kind of disagree with the bolded part. For some, throwing themselves into helping others is part of their recovery. The 12th step is, after all, "Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these Steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs." Perhaps Cochran has and continues to work the steps and is putting the 12th into practice in a meaningful way.

At least, that's my hope.

Like you and Padre, I've seen too many folks think they have it all figured out and become the smartest guy in the room. Those folks, inevitably, fail. And fail hard. After a few relapses, you figure out that you're actually the dumbest guy in the room and need to do things differently. My cousin did it that way. Unfortunately, he OD'd and didn't get another chance.

Maybe Cochran has found his way to do things differently.

Fingers crossed that he has.
I’m a firm believer in continuing to “carry the message” of hope, as is my son (13 years clean time). We both continue to work groups as servants and in sponsorship. I work closely with a family program locally to help families heal in terms of dealing with codependency issues and become a healthy support network for their loved one. It took us both years of inventory and amends work to reach the point of doing what we do now.

For Scott, after two relapses and only short periods of sobriety, jumping into a 12th step can be detrimental. This isn’t my opinion. This is almost a consensus opinion among many medical and treatment directors when it comes to addiction. Amends, personal inventory, contemplation and reflection take years. Sharing that personal story with those still suffering over the years builds the foundation for people to do what eventually Cochran is talking about.

As I said in my opening remarks, I applaud Scott Cochran for opening up about his issues, sharing his story, along with his honesty and humility. We need people to step up and step out. There is no shame in admitting to the problem. The shame is not seeking help. However, in order to help yourself by helping others, a firm foundation must be built. Rock solid, not built on shifting sand.

Scott, like you and I, has a lifetime to carry that message. Scott, in my opinion, needs continued investment in himself. Recovery, as you know, early on is a selfish program. It is about establishing the can and cannot, the boundaries, and what is good and bad for you as the addict. In many ways it is about self protection.

I hope Scott proves me wrong. I’ll just close by saying situations like what @Padreruf and you and I have seen say otherwise.

Congratulations btw on your continued progress. Peace be with you.
 

Joefus

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Wow. I remember the first cover story was an "Adderall adiction". Opioids are a particularly insidious dependency. We are still making the same mistakes we did 100 years ago.
yeah I remember reading about the adderall too. I remember thinking well that explains all the extra energy and go go go attitude. Sad stuff. Wonder if the drugs explain his exit from Tuscaloosa
 

Ole Man Dan

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I’m a firm believer in continuing to “carry the message” of hope, as is my son (13 years clean time). We both continue to work groups as servants and in sponsorship. I work closely with a family program locally to help families heal in terms of dealing with codependency issues and become a healthy support network for their loved one. It took us both years of inventory and amends work to reach the point of doing what we do now.

For Scott, after two relapses and only short periods of sobriety, jumping into a 12th step can be detrimental. This isn’t my opinion. This is almost a consensus opinion among many medical and treatment directors when it comes to addiction. Amends, personal inventory, contemplation and reflection take years. Sharing that personal story with those still suffering over the years builds the foundation for people to do what eventually Cochran is talking about.

As I said in my opening remarks, I applaud Scott Cochran for opening up about his issues, sharing his story, along with his honesty and humility. We need people to step up and step out. There is no shame in admitting to the problem. The shame is not seeking help. However, in order to help yourself by helping others, a firm foundation must be built. Rock solid, not built on shifting sand.

Scott, like you and I, has a lifetime to carry that message. Scott, in my opinion, needs continued investment in himself. Recovery, as you know, early on is a selfish program. It is about establishing the can and cannot, the boundaries, and what is good and bad for you as the addict. In many ways it is about self protection.

I hope Scott proves me wrong. I’ll just close by saying situations like what @Padreruf and you and I have seen say otherwise.

Congratulations btw on your continued progress. Peace be with you.
Scott is to be commended for going public with his addiction.
BUT... As a retired LEO I'd say he has a long road ahead of him.
Many try but few succeed.
I hope Scott works hard to beat his addiction, it will not be easy but he can do it. I wish all the best to Scott Cochran.
 

georgeted21

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I wish Scott well in his recovery. Opioid addiction is no laughing matter. I was recently put on 150mg fentanyl patches as well as 4 dulodid a day for blood clots destroying my finger tips and I was scared to death about the possibility of becoming addicted. They have since switched me over to Methadone, which they were very reluctant to do due to heart issues. I have gone from three methadone and four dulodid a day to a half meth and no dulodid. Im grateful that I have handled it so far. Next big test is amputation at the end of the month
 

CB4

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I wish Scott well in his recovery. Opioid addiction is no laughing matter. I was recently put on 150mg fentanyl patches as well as 4 dulodid a day for blood clots destroying my finger tips and I was scared to death about the possibility of becoming addicted. They have since switched me over to Methadone, which they were very reluctant to do due to heart issues. I have gone from three methadone and four dulodid a day to a half meth and no dulodid. Im grateful that I have handled it so far. Next big test is amputation at the end of the month
I’m so sorry you are going through all this. My prayers are with you.
 

64 Grad

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I have been sober for 37 years and I am 84. For one reason or another I am not able to help people with additions, but I am sure CB is right for the vast majority of cases. CB and people like him are a huge asset for helping addicts. I stopped going to AA after two years of sobriety and have not had a drink for 37 years. Thank God help is there for addicts. When I am personally confronted by addicts who are friends or family, I tell them they are the only solution. The most important thing I heard in my early recovery was "where you are is what is important." In this sense I think this is what CB is basically saying. He is a better person than me for his efforts on other people's behalf. I hope Steve Cochran's approach works for him.
 

CB4

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Thank you @64 Grad . My major points are really 1) recovery is an ongoing process. You can only control what happens that day and 2) recovery is a selfish process, at least early on. You must get well “down the road” of a personal recovery before you can jump to the “12th step” of carrying the message of hope to others. You must make sure you are well on your way to “fixing yourself” before trying to fix others.

Often those in the early phases of recovery experience the “pink cloud” - a period of exhilaration and euphoria. Life has improved, work and home life are better, and everything seems “sweet and easy”. Problem is that often leads to an overconfidence. And when adversity is faced, coping mechanisms aren’t in place and relapse occurs. It takes time for you to build those foundational mechanisms. For some it takes months, others years, and still others a lifetime.

Recovery is more that just “stopping”. It is a restructuring of your approach to your life. That is the where the personal inventory is so important (and constantly revisiting it) along with amends process. It is that work that builds the character of the person you know you want to be. It is those constant “inventories”, recognizing the issues your addiction caused, the willingness to “make it right” that keeps your recovery in the forefront of your mind. You come to realize that recovery must come first, because, as mentioned in the very first step, you are powerless over it, and without it your life becomes an unmanageable mess.

If this works for Scott Cochran, God bless him. I hope and pray that it does. Mine is simply a cautionary tale of a story I’ve seen play out far too often.

Edit: BTW @64 Grad congratulations on 37 years…one day at a time. Peace be with you.

Edit #2: one more add @64 Grad - don’t sell yourself short. You have “carried the message” to others. You’ve done it by living a life of sobriety for 37 years. Your actions speak volumes.
 
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64 Grad

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Thanks CB for your kind words. As a side note I quit smoking two years after I quit drinking. The nicotine addition was harder to get past than the alcohol for me. So far they are in my past and I feel blessed every day for that. I have no experience with other drugs.
 
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CB4

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Thanks CB for your kind words. As a side note I quit smoking two years after I quit drinking. The nicotine addition was harder to get past than the alcohol for me. So far they are in my past and I feel blessed every day for that. I have no experience with other drugs.
I’ve had medical directors tell me many patients have told them the very same thing. One told me had some patients withdrawing from nicotine that the urge to smoke was so bad they almost started drinking again.
 
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