Soldier stops to fold unserviceable flag at a home

Tidewater

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Mar 15, 2003
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Hooterville, Vir.
Man in Military Garb Filmed Folding Torn US Flag at North Carolina Home
Okay, so a soldier at Ft. Bragg on the way home, sees a United States flag flying from a home. The flag has been torn in recent storms, so the unknown soldier takes it down, folds it, and leaves it on the porch.
The homeowner, Frankie Grandstaff wrote about the moment captured on his home’s security system: “My flag ... ripped yesterday during our storm. This is how important the American Flag is to our Military!!!”
This may be a good time to remind folks who fly a US flag to check it out periodically and, if unserviceable, retire it.
The local American Legion Post here in Hooterville used to have a repurposed mailbox outside the meeting hall. Folks could drop unserviceable flags in the box and the Legion would collect unserviceable flags and dispose of them appropriately.
While I'm at it, folks place small 12" x 18" flags on the graves of loved ones in the Hooterville Cemetery. Then they leave them. It is inappropriate to have a US flag flying after sunset, unless that flag is lighted by a light, which is difficult in a cemetery with limited sources of electricity. It is okay to leave bunting to signify that the dead person was a soldier), but leaving a flag that will still be up after sunset and not lighted is to dishonor the flag that the dead loved served. A point to consider when placing a flag on a grave.
 
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TIDE-HSV

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Oct 13, 1999
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Huntsville, AL,USA
Some you know that I'm general counsel for and founder of Phoenix of Huntsville. Up until late last year, we manufactured 1/3, sometimes more, of the interment flags for the VA. We lost the contract, owing to a technicality, but it appears we've regained it through congressional action. Anyway, we ship the flags to the VA, which distributes to funeral homes. At the funeral home, the flag is removed from the packaging, which is prescribed by VA, and ironed and made ready for presentation. The packaging is prescribed by VA, as is the manner of packing. The packing is designed to be as compact as possible.

Well, one gentleman, no, subtract that, "individual" somehow received his relative's flag directly from VA, without the normal ironing and preparation. We'll never know how it happened. Anyway, he proceeded to email us about our disrespect for the flag, which was wrinkled and rolled. It was quite the diatribe, with what he thought of us described in four-letter terms. The answer didn't satisfy him and probably could have been worded better, frankly. Since he was threatening to write his congressman, and we had sensitive legislation before Congress, I was detailed to explain the process to him. I've received no answer, which I hope is good news. We do make a limited number of flags for direct consumption and they're presented in the traditional tri fold, in a matching case. We recently located a new supplier for the cases, an Amish woodworker across the line in southern TN. They're beautiful, in black walnut, with a plywood back, as opposed to the fiberboard backing on the old ones. His miter saw is gasoline-driven...
 

Go Bama

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Dec 6, 2009
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Thirteenessee
We learned proper flag etiquette at Robert E Lee elementary school. The flag was raised and lowered by two students and it was really great to be picked for flag duty. If it started raining, you got out of class to go get the flag. The flag was kept in the principal's office.

I'm not sure schools do this anymore. I don't know why they wouldn't.

The people in my neighborhood just run the flag up a pole and leave it until it's time to replace it.
 

B1GTide

TideFans Legend
Apr 13, 2012
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We learned proper flag etiquette at Robert E Lee elementary school. The flag was raised and lowered by two students and it was really great to be picked for flag duty. If it started raining, you got out of class to go get the flag. The flag was kept in the principal's office.

I'm not sure schools do this anymore. I don't know why they wouldn't.

The people in my neighborhood just run the flag up a pole and leave it until it's time to replace it.
Lost in history is the respect, but I can understand why. Our children see our government as the country, and there isn't much to respect.

My boys respect the flag because of the military history in our family. Buy it is a hard sell today.
 

DzynKingRTR

Hall of Fame
Dec 17, 2003
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Vinings, ga., usa
We learned proper flag etiquette at Robert E Lee elementary school. The flag was raised and lowered by two students and it was really great to be picked for flag duty. If it started raining, you got out of class to go get the flag. The flag was kept in the principal's office.

I'm not sure schools do this anymore. I don't know why they wouldn't.

The people in my neighborhood just run the flag up a pole and leave it until it's time to replace it.
My school did it as well. This would have been in the 80's. At my school if you were chosen that week to do it, you had done something great to deserve the right to do it (grades, helped a student or teacher, etc.). I had the honor at least once every year I was eligible (4th to 8th grade).

My niece and nephew went to my old school so I know they don't do it anymore.