Suspended Alabama freshman Antonio Alfano has ‘disappeared a little bit’

RTR91

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TideEngineer08

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They're not necessarily.

It's been reported he's in the Portal (his dad even said as much in his thread of tweets). I was told Friday he took his name out shortly after entering the Portal, and some beat writers said he didn't show up when searching.

Just another twist in this strange saga.
If I've learned anything from being a dad, even for a relatively short time, it's that strange and kids go hand in hand. When I was a kid, I was probably the same way and just never realized it.

I know 18 isn't the same as 5, but it's clear to me that the maturity element of the brain does not always fully develop the same for everyone and for some it's long after 18. I hope Alfano is able to come out of this for the better whether it's here or some place else.
 

Bamaro

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If I've learned anything from being a dad, even for a relatively short time, it's that strange and kids go hand in hand. When I was a kid, I was probably the same way and just never realized it.

I know 18 isn't the same as 5, but it's clear to me that the maturity element of the brain does not always fully develop the same for everyone and for some it's long after 18. I hope Alfano is able to come out of this for the better whether it's here or some place else.
The prefrontal cortex, which is important in Focusing one’s attention, Predicting the consequences of one’s actions; anticipating events in the environment; Impulse control; managing emotional reactions; planning for the future; Coordinating and adjusting complex behaviors (“I can’t do A until B happens”) is not fully developed until mid/late 20's.
 

Mke4Bama

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The prefrontal cortex, which is important in Focusing one’s attention, Predicting the consequences of one’s actions; anticipating events in the environment; Impulse control; managing emotional reactions; planning for the future; Coordinating and adjusting complex behaviors (“I can’t do A until B happens”) is not fully developed until mid/late 20's.
Yeah but I'm 63. Now what professor? :conf3: :D
 

jashleyren2

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i think we probably all were goofy up till 25
Some of us, meaning ME, take a bit longer. I'm 44. If you knew me, you'd know the elevator still doesn't reach the top floor :D

Worst thing about all that maturity that takes place between 18-25? We let those folks, primarily those folks, fight our wars, buy alcohol at 21, though they are drinking way before that, in a lot of cases, vote (and they show their lack of good judgement all the time on that one), and play major sports, among other things. Makes you appreciate the Tom Brady's of the world a little bit more, among others.
 

Toddrn

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I would have to disagree, respectfully. After high school joined USAF at 17. Married at 18, still married over 40 years. 2 kids at 23 and bought my first and only home just a few months before the second child was born. I don't have the answer or the reason but kids now are not as mature as they were just a decade or so ago.
i think we probably all were goofy up till 25
 

4Q Basket Case

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I would have to disagree, respectfully. After high school joined USAF at 17. Married at 18, still married over 40 years. 2 kids at 23 and bought my first and only home just a few months before the second child was born. I don't have the answer or the reason but kids now are not as mature as they were just a decade or so ago.
Exceptions noted, they're not generally forced to mature. And they're more prone to growing up in environments where parents don't take responsibility for the long-term consequences of their own actions, and therefore aren't the best examples.

There are lots of symptoms, but here are a few: Not as many kids work after school. They view their parents as ATM machines. Many grow up in homes where parents make penny-wise and pound foolish decisions based on the moment -- credit card debt to buy dinners out or household stuff that has no value the instant you walk out of the store. Buying big-ticket items by concentrating on the monthly payments, making six-figure household incomes and living paycheck to paycheck.

Whether the issue is financial or otherwise, it often boils down to sacrificing today to reap bigger benefits later -- many have not only never known that themselves, they've never lived in the same house with anybody who has known that.

To many of them (and worse, their parents), delayed gratification is a laughably outdated concept. Both literally and figuratively, why save up when you can put it on plastic?

Why work through a tough situation when you can just quit and blame it on somebody or something else?

I know this sounds like Clint Eastwood in Gran Torino, but it's my observation.

Now get off my lawn!
 
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irNate

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Exceptions noted, they're not generally forced to mature. And they're more prone to growing up in environments where parents don't take responsibility for the long-term consequences of their own actions, and therefore aren't the best examples.

There are lots of symptoms, but here are a few: Not as many kids work after school. They view their parents as ATM machines. Many grow up in homes where parents make penny-wise and pound foolish decisions based on the moment -- credit card debt to buy dinners out or household stuff that has no value the instant you walk out of the store. Buying big-ticket items by concentrating on the monthly payments, making six-figure household incomes and living paycheck to paycheck.

Whether the issue is financial or otherwise, it often boils down to sacrificing today to reap bigger benefits later -- many have not only never known that themselves, they've never lived in the same house with anybody who has known that.

To many of them (and worse, their parents), delayed gratification is a laughably outdated concept. Both literally and figuratively, why save up when you can put it on plastic?

Why work through a tough situation when you can just quit and blame it on somebody or something else?

I know this sounds like Clint Eastwood in Gran Torino, but it's my observation.

Now get off my lawn!
Its so hard to get the notion of instant gratification out of kids systems or blocking it from getting in. All their friends and teachers and everyone else is pounding the concept of instant gratification and entitlement into kids very very early. Its a battle with the kids for sure. thank goodness for prayer
 

mdb-tpet

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Exceptions noted, they're not generally forced to mature. And they're more prone to growing up in environments where parents don't take responsibility for the long-term consequences of their own actions, and therefore aren't the best examples.

There are lots of symptoms, but here are a few: Not as many kids work after school. They view their parents as ATM machines. Many grow up in homes where parents make penny-wise and pound foolish decisions based on the moment -- credit card debt to buy dinners out or household stuff that has no value the instant you walk out of the store. Buying big-ticket items by concentrating on the monthly payments, making six-figure household incomes and living paycheck to paycheck.

Whether the issue is financial or otherwise, it often boils down to sacrificing today to reap bigger benefits later -- many have not only never known that themselves, they've never lived in the same house with anybody who has known that.

To many of them (and worse, their parents), delayed gratification is a laughably outdated concept. Both literally and figuratively, why save up when you can put it on plastic?

Why work through a tough situation when you can just quit and blame it on somebody or something else?

I know this sounds like Clint Eastwood in Gran Torino, but it's my observation.

Now get off my lawn!
I would propose none of us really know more than a few thousand kids out the billions alive today, so it's really hard to say much about the full population of kids. The kids around you may be dramatically affected by the culture and parenting style of your neighborhood/city/state. There's a million trade offs being chosen everyday between what your parents did and what your generation is doing to raise kids as well. But, I agree generally, we are protecting our kids too much and not letting them grow up as fast as before as far as I've seen in my travels. But there are some upsides to that, as I was forced to grow up too soon.
 

Toddrn

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Everyone's situation is different. My Father had a massive heart attack at 40 and was unable to work after that. Believe me he tried. Passed away at 55. I got my first job at 12-13 cleaning up cars at a used car dealer that knew my Father. My kids got their first job at 16. I bought my first car, I bought them theirs. They were required to have a job so they could pay for insurance, gas and repairs. They both did this while maintaining good grades. Both have gone on to college and received their degrees, work full time and own their own homes with no help from their parents. I believe that as a parent it is your job to raise responsible, self sufficient, tax paying adults. Someone has to pay into SS so it will be there when I start drawing in 6 years.
I would propose none of us really know more than a few thousand kids out the billions alive today, so it's really hard to say much about the full population of kids. The kids around you may be dramatically affected by the culture and parenting style of your neighborhood/city/state. There's a million trade offs being chosen everyday between what your parents did and what your generation is doing to raise kids as well. But, I agree generally, we are protecting our kids too much and not letting them grow up as fast as before as far as I've seen in my travels. But there are some upsides to that, as I was forced to grow up too soon.
 

bamaslammer

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Parents in America need to take a few lessons from the Greatest generation on parenting. My parents were from the generation that Survived the depression, took down two superpowers, then came back home and built America and landed men on the moon. They have loved me always and will always love me, but they made it clear that if I made stupid decisions, they would NOT support me, Why would you support a stupid decision? Even more so when you know your kid is still a kid and knowing kids don't think straight. It changes somewhat as a kid turns into a man but lets be clear, Alfano is a kid and needs to listen to the adults in the room. As did I when I was his age.
 

B1GTide

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Parents in America need to take a few lessons from the Greatest generation on parenting. My parents were from the generation that Survived the depression, took down two superpowers, then came back home and built America and landed men on the moon. They have loved me always and will always love me, but they made it clear that if I made stupid decisions, they would NOT support me, Why would you support a stupid decision? Even more so when you know your kid is still a kid and knowing kids don't think straight. It changes somewhat as a kid turns into a man but lets be clear, Alfano is a kid and needs to listen to the adults in the room. As did I when I was his age.
Ummm, the greatest generation produced the most selfish generation in history. Just sayin'.
 

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