The Perpetual Gun Control Thread

bama_wayne1

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Jun 15, 2007
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I know many won't agree, but I wonder sometimes if the lack of personal interaction in this country is somehow a part of the problem. People now text more than they have face to face communications. Young people are more into digital everything. They game a lot, text each other even when together and rely on social media to express themselves. There should be studies done about what were these shooters involved in, not so much content but method. When I grew up being a military brat I had to meet new people a lot and learn different cultures. Our childhood issues were settled face to face without parental involvement for the most part. It's harder to be violent with someone you have a real relationship with. Are there too many people having too much of there interaction digitally? I sure hope we can find a way to reach this type of person and pull them out of whatever issues they are having trouble resolving before it gets out of hand.
 
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92tide

TideFans Legend
May 9, 2000
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So none of them ever have a beef with the police? With judges? With legislators?

C'mon., lol.
there are plenty off shootings at courthouses, stories about how police were ambushed responding to fake calls, and for legislators there was the softball game where steve scalise was shot and gabby giffords being shot a few years back.
 

TIDE-HSV

Senior Administrator
Staff member
Oct 13, 1999
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I guess I'll just throw this out here - fundamentally speaking, the discussion is essentially this - everyone I have ever spoken about this, from avid shooters to those who wish to ban firearms entirely, would like to see gun violence drastically reduced and is both angered and saddened by these mass shootings. That said, what gun restriction proponents are asking is essentially that may of us willingly curtail our own rights for the betterment of the whole. I own 'high capacity' magazines and AR pattern rifles. I also own pistols that carry more than 10 rounds (the typical cutoff when people discuss 'high capacity magazines'). Yet I've only ever enjoyed these in peace, target shooting, firearm safety drills, etc. I own these for my enjoyment and the protection of myself and my family - and I'm no different that about 99% of all legal firearm owners in that regard.

Why we keep circling back to is this - discussing compromises of our rights without ensuring that we've solved any underlying problems is generally not going to fly with gun owners. While there are some gun owners who are unwilling to discuss any potential compromise, you'd likely be surprised at how many are open to at least discussing it intelligently - but it has to start with digging deep and researching where the problem comes from.

We didn't just wake up in the mid-90s and suddenly have more guns around - this country has been stocked to the gills with firearms since it began. Something has changed - be it something in out society, something in our medicines or food, I have no idea. But something is fundamentally different now than it was 30 years ago. Unless / until we divine and figure that out, you're going find a lot of gun owners unwilling to compromise, as we know these things WILL continue.
I do have to quibble a bit with this. I grew up in the 40s and 50s. I literally knew no one who owned a handgun. Even in college, I knew one guy, who had a Ruger Blackhawk .44 magnum and he was considered a weirdo. The tidal wave of handguns started later...
 

crimsonaudio

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Sep 9, 2002
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I do have to quibble a bit with this. I grew up in the 40s and 50s. I literally knew no one who owned a handgun. Even in college, I knew one guy, who had a Ruger Blackhawk .44 magnum and he was considered a weirdo. The tidal wave of handguns started later...
Can't argue with your experience, but as far back I can remember (early 80's) guns (including handguns) were everywhere.
 

Wilson Monroe

1st Team
Jul 19, 2016
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Should we implement the same level of security and protection for our public schools as we do our courthouses?

I have told all the folks I came into contact with over this issue today the exact same thing.

I had to go to city hall last week. Three armed guards watched as my bag went through an x-ray and I went through a metal detector. Surely our elected officials would be willing to donate their security to the local schools until they could replace theirs with bake sales, walk-a-thons, and coupon book sales. It's exactly what the schools do. Why would we not expect an elected official to make an honorable sacrifice such as this?
 

TIDE-HSV

Senior Administrator
Staff member
Oct 13, 1999
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But seriously - why do they always pick schools? It's because they know they won't face armed resistance.

When was the last time someone shot up a courthouse, police station, gun shop, heck anywhere that the inhabitants were likely to be armed?
I think that is only part of the story. The rest of it is that many of these mass school shooters do indeed have deep-seated problems revolving around their troubled youths. Schools are a logical target...
 

92tide

TideFans Legend
May 9, 2000
38,088
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East Point, Ga, USA
I guess I'll just throw this out here - fundamentally speaking, the discussion is essentially this - everyone I have ever spoken about this, from avid shooters to those who wish to ban firearms entirely, would like to see gun violence drastically reduced and is both angered and saddened by these mass shootings. That said, what gun restriction proponents are asking is essentially that may of us willingly curtail our own rights for the betterment of the whole. I own 'high capacity' magazines and AR pattern rifles. I also own pistols that carry more than 10 rounds (the typical cutoff when people discuss 'high capacity magazines'). Yet I've only ever enjoyed these in peace, target shooting, firearm safety drills, etc. I own these for my enjoyment and the protection of myself and my family - and I'm no different that about 99% of all legal firearm owners in that regard.

Why we keep circling back to is this - discussing compromises of our rights without ensuring that we've solved any underlying problems is generally not going to fly with gun owners. While there are some gun owners who are unwilling to discuss any potential compromise, you'd likely be surprised at how many are open to at least discussing it intelligently - but it has to start with digging deep and researching where the problem comes from.

We didn't just wake up in the mid-90s and suddenly have more guns around - this country has been stocked to the gills with firearms since it began. Something has changed - be it something in out society, something in our medicines or food, I have no idea. But something is fundamentally different now than it was 30 years ago. Unless / until we divine and figure that out, you're going find a lot of gun owners unwilling to compromise, as we know these things WILL continue.
i doubt this will answer any/all of your questions, but i'll post it anyway. it hints a little at what i think bama wayne was saying about interactions online.

link

In the 1970s, if you thought Ted Bundy was a hero for murdering all those women, you kept that to yourself. You couldn’t just casually say, “Wow, that guy had a POINT!” to someone or else people would think you were nuts. You couldn’t go on a YouTube video and post about how great he was. Today, people who feel that way can find each other, they can commiserate without being judged. They can talk online about how much they would really like to murder a bunch of women. They get to cherish their resentments, nurture them and watch them grow.

Like a cult leader going from prophet to messiah to Literal Jesus, the insular nature of these groups creates a need for constant escalation. Someone may stop by one of these forums because they are having a bad day, because they feel slighted in some way, or because their crush wouldn’t go out with them and they feel bad, and eventually get so sucked into these communities that instead of dealing with these common life events in a healthy way, they start one-upping each other to the point where they fantasize about murdering people. They start out being “I’m not a racist but…” types and end up dreaming about a white ethnostate and praising Hitler. They lose touch with reality.

Socialization is not innate, it is learned — and the fact that more of it is being learned on the internet these days rather than in-person has consequences. It’s easier to see other people as NPCs who don’t feel the same way you do, it’s easier to dismiss their humanity when most of your interaction with them is on social media, where most people are pretending to have a fabulous and perfect life. Even when they’re not putting on that facade, even if they’re angsty as hell, it’s still just words on a page.
 

danb

All-SEC
Dec 4, 2011
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Hazel Green, AL
Can't argue with your experience, but as far back I can remember (early 80's) guns (including handguns) were everywhere.
That’s been my experience through the same era growing up as well.

In addition to your earlier post about the presence of guns at your HS, I experienced the same at my HS.

I remember in HS several folks would have shotguns and/or rifles hanging in gun racks in their trucks. Probably 75-80% of the guys would carry a pocketknife at all times. In my JROTC class we had .22 rifles our Sargent would hand out to us (along with ammo) and we would walk out to the Quonset hut that was between the baseball and football field that was our indoor shooting range and shoot for the entire class to qualify for marksman, or just for fun competition.

I don’t remember hearing of any mass shootings when I was in HS and growing up through the years until Columbine. We had a lot of fights in school, but it never went past somebody getting a good butt whipping. I’m wondering what the underlying cause is that’s driving more and more of these mass shooting to occur, because I ain’t buying the angle it’s because of more guns.



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Bamaro

Hall of Fame
Oct 19, 2001
21,378
174
73
Jacksonville, Md USA
It should be kept in mind that as horrendous that these mass shootings are, especially at schools, the real gun problem is the carnage taking place EVERY DAY on our streets.