Question: What is the employment situation like where you are?

Chukker Veteran

Hall of Fame
Feb 6, 2001
9,596
2,900
287
I was reading an article by Paul Krugman this morning...he was addressing what he thought were unrealistic predictions of out of control inflation. One example he cited I was vaguely familiar with, lumber prices. They have spiked during the virus, but Krugman points out the supply is catching up and the price has dropped substantially since the peak. I would like to think we might be seeing a similar thing going on with food prices now, although I understand climate change also plays a big role in some rising costs.

Paul Krugman on Twitter: "So, while I was away the case for inflation panic died. Or actually the cases, plural. For these past few months there have been two inflation stories, both crucially requiring a key failure on the part of the Fed. Now we know both stories are wrong 1/" / Twitter
 

Bodhisattva

Hall of Fame
Aug 22, 2001
20,697
763
237
Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida
I know that you used the blue font, but a ton of businesses rely on retired workers to fill out their employee rosters. These are jobs with no expectation of benefits or career paths. The reduction of this pool of employees hurts those businesses a great deal.
Yep, I'm very familiar. Reading about how various markets work and associated business plans is something I started way back in my investment banking days and is still a source of nerd enjoyment.
 
  • Like
Reactions: B1GTide

seebell

Hall of Fame
Mar 12, 2012
10,729
2,871
187
Gurley, Al

First off, a couple of aging workforce statistics to give you an idea about the extent of the problem. In the US alone, 10 000 baby boomers turn 65 every day. According to an article by Arlene S. Hirsch, M.A., LCPC, for SHRM, this is something that started in 2011 and will continue until 2030.

Since the average retirement age of a baby boomer lies somewhere between 61 and 65, it’s not hard to see that this so-called silver tsunami is going to create some serious challenges for HR; the main one being, how are they going to fill the talent gap that’s left between the number of baby boomers that retires and the number of younger workers with the right skills to replace them?
 

Toddrn

All-SEC
Nov 29, 2006
1,445
961
137
Woodstock, Ga
Well Chick-Fil-A near me doesn't seem to have an issue. They also have a sign saying they are hiring for $14/hr.
Is the Chick-Fil-A dining room open? They have kept them closed in my area. Also, Zaxby's is offering 17 an hour and Dariy Queen 15 with paid vacation and a sign on bonus.
 
Last edited:
  • Wow
Reactions: seebell

crimsonaudio

Administrator
Staff member
Sep 9, 2002
52,482
28,426
362
crimsonaudio.net
I wouldn't pick a number because the cost of living is different everywhere, but if $20/hr is necessary in that area - absolutely. Why should some people be able to live their dream at the expense of others?
So not only does one (or a few) people not make any money but everyone associated with said business is drawing unemployment?

There has to be a middle ground. I don't know if you've ever owned a small business (I own several), but balancing the health of the business with what's best for the employees isn't always a black and white issue.
 

crimsonaudio

Administrator
Staff member
Sep 9, 2002
52,482
28,426
362
crimsonaudio.net
I think it means clearing enough from a 40 hour work week that you can pay all your bills and lead a decent style of life. Not a lavish lifestyle, just what most people take for granted. An occasional vacation, for instance.
The problem is not every job should provide this.

Like it or not it's never been this way. And it never will be.
 

MobtownK

All-American
Nov 20, 2004
2,923
5,926
187
42
Mobile, Alabama, United States
Maybe I've been out of the workforce for too long, but the $20 mark for unskilled labor is wild to me. My last job I made 35k a year - 8 years ago. That was after a decade of experience, and many specialized training certifications. If you calculate 35k down to hourly - it's less than $20/hr. It was a step down from the job before that where I made 20/hr - but had no benefits and had very little work/life balance. When my son was born I was told I had to work from home within a few weeks or risk getting fired. It was worth the pay cut.
 
  • Like
Reactions: seebell

uafanataum

All-American
Oct 18, 2014
2,663
994
132
Maybe I've been out of the workforce for too long, but the $20 mark for unskilled labor is wild to me. My last job I made 35k a year - 8 years ago. That was after a decade of experience, and many specialized training certifications. If you calculate 35k down to hourly - it's less than $20/hr. It was a step down from the job before that where I made 20/hr - but had no benefits and had very little work/life balance. When my son was born I was told I had to work from home within a few weeks or risk getting fired. It was worth the pay cut.
With inflation out of control, 20 an hour will be like 10 an hour very soon.
ETA:
One thing I just thought about. If inflation gets too bad it could really start hurting peoples 401k. If you were told to save a million to maintain a certain quality of living in retirement but after you retire everything gets 50% more expensive in a matter of 2 years then you could run through your 401k way earlier than you thought would happen. With me being 30 if I need more money in my retirement I have plenty of time to do that. But for people that already retired this past year has to be scary.
 
Last edited:
  • Thank You
Reactions: MobtownK

selmaborntidefan

TideFans Legend
Mar 31, 2000
29,753
15,495
287
52
Wishing I was somewhere close to Duluth
Here's my situation:

19 full-time employees that cover 24/7 (plus several PRNs)
2 are out on LOA with surgeries (19 - 2 = 17)
1 is out who just had a baby and another is about to be out with one (17 - 2 = 15)
3 of our PRNs have no more than 8 hours scheduled across the month
1 is POC and not very good on the bench and is lazy to boot
1 is out with Covid (15 - 1 = 14)
Another 1 just quit (14 - 1 = 13)
1 more just turned in her notice (13 - 1 = 12)
1 more is me about to leave (11 - 1 = 10)

That's ten people we're about to have covering the work that takes twice that many people - and bear in mind, I didn't include the fact we're low on phlebotomists, so on top of all of the additional work, we have to process a large number of the specimens, too (the Phleb supervisor has been out since June with cancer). And the remaining ones have either been running non-stop for 18 months or are in their first lab job, one or the other.

This isn't the only lab with similar issues.

And btw, we're not a mandated vaccine, but we haven't had anyone suggest they'll quit over it. Lab folks aren't nurses - which at the risk of sounding condescending, we tend to know a whole lot more about immunology and the infectious process than they do (they know more about how to treat it firsthand than we do). I'm not meaning to pick on nurses because I do know plenty of smart ones who wouldn't fit the category above; but most don't know as much as they think they do about immunology or they wouldn't be hiding behind their "choice."

Not. Good.
 

92tide

TideFans Legend
May 9, 2000
49,432
25,901
287
52
East Point, Ga, USA
quelle suprise

 

92tide

TideFans Legend
May 9, 2000
49,432
25,901
287
52
East Point, Ga, USA

uafanataum

All-American
Oct 18, 2014
2,663
994
132
The wages they are talking about in that article are atrocious. $8.65 an hour. I have not worked for that little in 11 years! They must not really be too desperate for employees if they will not pay them more than that.
 

New Posts

Latest threads