News Article: Inmate dies following botched Oklahoma execution, second execution delayed

Bamaro

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Oct 19, 2001
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An Oklahoma inmate who was supposed to be executed Tuesday instead died of a heart attack after the execution was botched, state officials said.

Clayton Lockett’s execution Tuesday night was halted after about 20 minutes due to an issue with a vein, the Associated Press reported. Not long after Lockett was deemed unconscious from the first of three drugs, he began “writhing on the gurney,” according to the Associated Press. He was declared dead 43 minutes after the execution began.

Lockett and Charles F. Warner were both supposed to be executed Tuesday night, Lockett at 6 p.m. and Warner at 8 p.m. After the botched execution, Warner’s execution has been stayed for two weeks. Lockett was convicted of shooting a teenager and watching as she was buried alive; Warner was convicted of raping and murdering his girlfriend’s 11-month-old baby.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...d-inmate-still-dies-second-execution-delayed/
I wonder why lethal injection always involves a cocktail of drugs. Why not just inject an overdose of heroin. :conf2:
 
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Jessica4Bama

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Nov 7, 2009
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So the state will probably be sued for this "botched" death (how is it botched whenever the dude is dead?) because he suffered. What about the girl he shot and watched as she was buried alive? I'm sure she didn't suffer any.
 

AV8N

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Sep 18, 2013
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Lockett shot a teenage girl, then had her buried alive. Because she walked in on him robbing and beating someone. I wonder how long she lived in agony before she died of her wounds.

So, while I don't want to see gov't intentionally inflict cruel and unusual punishment, I'm not going to worry too much about this.
 

bamachile

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Count me with those who don't understand why the process is so complicated and difficult. With animals, it consists of one drug to cause unconsciousness followed by another to stop the heart. If there is a resident pharmacologist on the boards with better insight, I would love to hear why this isn't sufficient for legal executions.

Lockett shot a teenage girl, then had her buried alive. Because she walked in on him robbing and beating someone. I wonder how long she lived in agony before she died of her wounds.

So, while I don't want to see gov't intentionally inflict cruel and unusual punishment, I'm not going to worry too much about this.
Meanwhile, ^^^this^^^
 

bamachile

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Considering the crime those two committed, I'd say the execution went swimmingly. Why show mercy to pieces of trash like that?
1) Precedent - if this becomes the new normal, shall we next revert to drawing and quartering?
2) Widespread disregard for human life was the root of La Terreur and the Red Terror.
3) Considering how low the two murderers in focus set the bar, I have no desire to play limbo.


IOW, the mercy on our part has nothing to do with their just deserts, only with our refusal to allow their savagery to sink our civilization. The only justifiable reason for supporting the death penalty in the first place is that is necessary for the maintenance of a just society. If revenge is the basis, we lose all hope of civilization.


BTW, I do understand the sentiment and the frustration with our glorification of criminals. Also, FWIW, I support the death penalty, but I believe that it's proper execution (the pun is unavoidable) is critical to it's role.
 

Bama Reb

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Nov 2, 2005
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Considering the eventual positive outcome of the execution, I fail to see anything wrong with it.
Fwiw though, I'm still an avid proponent of death by hanging. It's fast and gets the job done right the first time.
No need in letting the guy "hang around" while others wait for him to die. Best of all, there's plenty of room outside for a public execution. Let the folks see for themselves what happens to the violent offenders.
 
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Crimson1967

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Nov 22, 2011
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While I'm not sure exactly where I stand wrt the death penalty, I find it impossible to feel bad for this guy
I oppose the death penalty for a number of reasons, but it doesn't bother me when people are executed.

The lethal injection consists of three drugs. The first puts you to sleep and the next two stop the heart and breathing.
 

selmaborntidefan

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Mar 31, 2000
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What irks me is the coverage of this. Did any of you read the CNN webpage yesterday when this broke?

Here is what the victim of Lockett got while Lockett got all this sympathy:

Lockett was convicted in 2000 of a bevy of crimes, including first-degree murder, first-degree rape, kidnapping and robbery in a 1999 home invasion and crime spree that left Stephanie Nieman dead and two people injured.



Not a word about her suffering, not a word about it taking more than one shot, not a word about her being buried alive. And not a word about her having graduated from high school only two weeks earlier. CNN is on an anti-death penalty kick and keeps pulling out "stayed executions."


The anti-death penalty folks would be more influential if they would at least admit that there are on occasion some folks who actually deserve to be executed. Osama Bin Laden. Timothy McVeigh. John Wayne Gacy. Ted Bundy. If they would at least acknowledge killing spree folks and mass murderers about which there is NO DOUBT they killed multiple folks actually deserve execution then they would influence more people about the black guy who killed the white woman but "that's all he did."

I'm no longer completely certain about it - but in light of the fact there's no doubt this guy did it - who cares?
 

crimsonaudio

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The anti-death penalty folks would be more influential if they would at least admit that there are on occasion some folks who actually deserve to be executed. Osama Bin Laden. Timothy McVeigh. John Wayne Gacy. Ted Bundy. If they would at least acknowledge killing spree folks and mass murderers about which there is NO DOUBT they killed multiple folks actually deserve execution then they would influence more people about the black guy who killed the white woman but "that's all he did."
There are those of us who, based on basic libertarian principles, don't think the State should have the right to execute people.

And that doesn't even begin to discuss my struggle with it as a Christian...
 

PacadermaTideUs

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Dec 10, 2009
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The anti-death penalty folks would be more influential if they would at least admit that there are on occasion some folks who actually deserve to be executed. Osama Bin Laden. Timothy McVeigh. John Wayne Gacy. Ted Bundy. If they would at least acknowledge killing spree folks and mass murderers about which there is NO DOUBT they killed multiple folks actually deserve execution then they would influence more people about the black guy who killed the white woman but "that's all he did."

I'm no longer completely certain about it - but in light of the fact there's no doubt this guy did it - who cares?
I completely agree with you. My hesitance has more to do with knowing that innocent people are sometimes convicted. In my view, there's no acceptable level of getting it wrong that warrants the state having authority to end a life. Too often, juries convict largely on circumstantial evidence, more akin to an opinion of guilt, rather than proof of it. That opinion may be accurate. But it may not be.

In cases where we know beyond ANY doubt that the convicted is guilty, I don't think I have a big problem with it. But the standard for conviction (beyond a reasonable doubt), leaves too much wiggle room for juries to get it wrong - what constitutes "reasonable" is largely subjective.

I don't like that determination of innocence or guilt and sentencing tend to be too independent of each other. I think the required burden of proof should depend on the sentence sought. Seeking under 20yrs? Beyond a reasonable doubt may be sufficient. Seeking the death penalty? There shouldn't be any doubt at all, reasonable or otherwise.
 
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