Why do players opt out?

Im_on_dsp

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Not really - it's one thing to transfer, another thing to take the NIL money and 'retire'.

But yes, I suspect there will be specific language on some / all NIL deals moving forward.
I don't know the specifics of any one deal but I imagine the companies are smart enough to have an expiration date on the deal. I'm thinking they are probably one year deals, subject to being renewed. If this is the case then Bo Nix won't be getting any more money out of Milos.
 

B1GTide

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You can live a good life while being frugal with your money.
That may be true if one were retiring today in their 60s or 70s, but not if retiring in their 20s. Inflation will make what might be a reasonable monthly income today into poverty level income in 30-40 years.

But, if they invest it, don't touch it, and get a regular job, when they do reach their 60s they will be wealthy.
 

Power Eye

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They do, but they can sit out and make just as much, if not more money because some companies will have a bidding war to see who can sign those two future top 5 picks.
I have no idea where the NIL world is headed, but I would tend to disagree that they can sit out and make more money, and I am strictly talking about NIL money, not future NFL earning potential. The appeal of someone like Bryce Young or Will Anderson is that they are still playing college football. If they opt-out, then that appeal goes away and they are just another future NFL draftee with the same marketing appeal as any other future NFL rookie, which I would doubt is as much as a college star.
 
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CB4

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I think if or when NIL money gets so stupid that college players earn enough in three or four years to the extent they say "nah I'm good" to pro contracts, that is when things change. That is when the NFL decides it is time to get them "early" and goes the route of minor or developmental leagues like the NBA or MLB. I imagine in the very near future the NBA "G-League" is going to get even more aggressive going after players that would traditionally opt for college for a year or two.

The "if or when" are the operative words.

College football is the developmental league for NFL. The golden egg laying goose. If it means taking that goose and putting in their barnyard, they will do it. I know the argument is that "pro football has tried development leagues. They didn't work". They didn't work because they were getting the vast majority of their talent from college programs via the draft. They didn't need those leagues to be successful.

And truthfully, that would be fine by me.
 

B1GTide

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I think if or when NIL money gets so stupid that college players earn enough in three or four years to the extent they say "nah I'm good" to pro contracts, that is when things change. That is when the NFL decides it is time to get them "early" and goes the route of minor or developmental leagues like the NBA or MLB. I imagine in the very near future the NBA "G-League" is going to get even more aggressive going after players that would traditionally opt for college for a year or two.

The "if or when" are the operative words.

College football is the developmental league for NFL. The golden egg laying goose. If it means taking that goose and putting in their barnyard, they will do it. I know the argument is that "pro football has tried development leagues. They didn't work". They didn't work because they were getting the vast majority of their talent from college programs via the draft. They didn't need those leagues to be successful.

And truthfully, that would be fine by me.
A good point. I think that it will take a few years for companies to work out the value that they are really getting from these NIL deals, and then the market will adjust accordingly. I do not know where that lands - players making more or less - but the market does what it does.

Then we will have outliers which are clearly not market based deals, but deals written only to steer athletes to a particular program. How long do they survive if they do not produce the desired outcome? How long is a wealthy man willing to pour money into a black hole with no national championships to show for it? Some will be willing to do so forever just for program access and ego - these are the same people who donate millions of dollars to the school athletic programs now. So, when their money goes to the players instead of the school, what happens?

It will be interesting to see how it plays out.
 

teamplayer

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I have no idea where the NIL world is headed, but I would tend to disagree that they can sit out and make more money, and I am strictly talking about NIL money, not future NFL earning potential. The appeal of someone like Bryce Young or Will Anderson is that they are still playing college football. If they opt-out, then that appeal goes away and they are just another future NFL draftee with the same marketing appeal as any other future NFL rookie, which I would doubt is as much as a college star.
If either of them were just another future draftee who might get drafted in the 6th round, sure. Both of these guys are probably top five picks who already represent themselves very well on and off the field. Companies will be throwing truckloads of cash at them either way.