A huge win today at my doctor's office...

uafan4life

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Mar 30, 2001
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First, a little background. I've never been a gym rat kind of guy, even back when I was playing sports in school and college. The only times I've ever exercised regularly was when someone was yelling at me.
;)

A number of years ago, I was on some medications for a few years that had among the primary side effects increased appetite, weight gain, and increased appetite plus weight gain. Yes, they doubled it up on me! :) Well, combined with my already not-so-healthy lifestyle, I ended up gaining quite a bit of weight. Even after changing medications, my weight kept slowly creeping up. Throughout this time, though, my physicals and blood work always came back great. Despite my weight - which every physician repeatedly stated I needed to address - I was surprisingly healthy. And I kept on kicking that can down the road, thinking I had plenty of time to get back into shape someday down the road...

In January, though, that changed.

During a routine visit - less than a year after my previous physical where everything was okay - I must have mentioned something that caught my primary care physician's attention and he asked to do some blood work just to double-check some things. And, as it turned out, my A1C was over 10% and I was a full-blown diabetic. I was prescribed some medications and advised to make some changes in my diet. And, for the first time in years, I had no choice but to get my posterior in motion on this matter...

Today, I had my follow-up appointment.

I was excited - because I knew I had made some good strides - but also apprehensive, of course. I already knew that my weight had dropped to lower than it had been in quite some time. Today, the nurse informed me that my weight was lower than it had ever been measured by them - which is over a decade!

Additionally, my A1C has dropped to only 5.4%!!!

My prognostication has gone from having full-blown diabetes, needing to make drastic changes, and it being something we're very concerned about to, "I'm never going to say that you no longer have diabetes but you just need to keep doing what you're doing and it won't be something we have to worry about"...
 

Bazza

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Oct 1, 2011
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Congrats, @uafan4life ! Much respect to you for doing what it took to achieve the results you needed.

A LOT of folks just can't (or won't).

Which I don't understand because who doesn't like a challenge and what better reward than a more healthy and enjoyable life?!?!
 
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NationalTitles18

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May 25, 2003
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First, a little background. I've never been a gym rat kind of guy, even back when I was playing sports in school and college. The only times I've ever exercised regularly was when someone was yelling at me.
;)

A number of years ago, I was on some medications for a few years that had among the primary side effects increased appetite, weight gain, and increased appetite plus weight gain. Yes, they doubled it up on me! :) Well, combined with my already not-so-healthy lifestyle, I ended up gaining quite a bit of weight. Even after changing medications, my weight kept slowly creeping up. Throughout this time, though, my physicals and blood work always came back great. Despite my weight - which every physician repeatedly stated I needed to address - I was surprisingly healthy. And I kept on kicking that can down the road, thinking I had plenty of time to get back into shape someday down the road...

In January, though, that changed.

During a routine visit - less than a year after my previous physical where everything was okay - I must have mentioned something that caught my primary care physician's attention and he asked to do some blood work just to double-check some things. And, as it turned out, my A1C was over 10% and I was a full-blown diabetic. I was prescribed some medications and advised to make some changes in my diet. And, for the first time in years, I had no choice but to get my posterior in motion on this matter...

Today, I had my follow-up appointment.

I was excited - because I knew I had made some good strides - but also apprehensive, of course. I already knew that my weight had dropped to lower than it had been in quite some time. Today, the nurse informed me that my weight was lower than it had ever been measured by them - which is over a decade!

Additionally, my A1C has dropped to only 5.4%!!!

My prognostication has gone from having full-blown diabetes, needing to make drastic changes, and it being something we're very concerned about to, "I'm never going to say that you no longer have diabetes but you just need to keep doing what you're doing and it won't be something we have to worry about"...
Awesome job! Thank you for sharing.

Similar thing happened to me 1.5 years ago. It's not easy.

Two things to discuss that many people don't understand about your situation and that of many others:

1. Some medications absolutely alter metabolism and hunger and cause weight gain. A number of medications do, but the one I'll mention is insulin. Yes, treating diabetes, for some, causes weight gain. Some absolutely essential to some people medications are associated with a higher likelihood of diabetes and obesity.

2. Diabetes causes polyphagia - one of the three "Ps". It's difficult to not gain weight with excess hunger (polyphagia). And often it causes cravings for the worst foods for a diabetic to eat because the brain needs tons of sugar now and if it can't use the sugar that's there then it doesn't "see" it (due to either not enough insulin or insulin resistance) and so signals the body to ingest more. It's a vicious cycle.

That's not to say that you don't work on it despite those things, just that it is more difficult to overcome dealing with those things. It very much helps to understand what is happening to your body and why so you can help to counter the cycle. It also helps to be on the right medication(s).
 

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