Rule Tweaks for 2019 Season (Targeting, OT Rules, Blindside Blocks)

CraigD

All-SEC
Aug 8, 2006
1,880
7
48
Columbus, GA
What does it mean, “There is now no option for stands as a part of a Targeting review”?


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IndyBison

1st Team
Dec 22, 2013
357
57
38
in case anyone needs a primer on what a blindside block is ;)

Not only was that play featured heavily in training videos the following year (it should have been a foul for unnecessary roughness but nobody was watching it apparently), but it also added a new kind of defenseless player: a passer after a change of possession. The reason why that matters is there are two kinds of targeting: initiating contact with the crown of the helmet and forcible contact to the head or neck area of a defenseless opponent. The former doesn't apply here and at the time the latter didn't either because he wasn't considered defenseless. The blindside hit was also added to the defenseless category, but the passer any time after a change of possession is considered defenseless even if it's a hit he can clearly see coming. I assume it was just to protect that valuable player even more.
 

Tidewater

Hall of Fame
Mar 15, 2003
17,551
1,877
173
Hooterville, Vir.
So, with the 5th and subsequent OT, each team just goes for two, with no touchdowns? I mean, they are not giving them credit for the TD, just the 2 points? I ask because it will impact on PPG offense and scoring defense stats.
 

WMack4Bama

Administrator
Staff member
Nov 7, 2008
11,289
72
108
Tuscaloosa, AL
macksminute.blogspot.com
And cut blocks are still as legal as the forward pass....
And they always will be from tackle to tackle as long as the defender isn’t engaged.

I have a meeting next week to get versed on the specifics of all the rule changes (high school typically follows the same rules as college). I’ll pass along any noticeable differences that didn’t make the headlines.
 

RTR91

Super Moderator
Nov 23, 2007
39,407
2
0
Prattville
Not only was that play featured heavily in training videos the following year (it should have been a foul for unnecessary roughness but nobody was watching it apparently), but it also added a new kind of defenseless player: a passer after a change of possession. The reason why that matters is there are two kinds of targeting: initiating contact with the crown of the helmet and forcible contact to the head or neck area of a defenseless opponent. The former doesn't apply here and at the time the latter didn't either because he wasn't considered defenseless. The blindside hit was also added to the defenseless category, but the passer any time after a change of possession is considered defenseless even if it's a hit he can clearly see coming. I assume it was just to protect that valuable player even more.
That was the cleanest block in the history of football. I don't care what anyone tries to tell me.
 

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