Science: Space - the final frontier (Misc.)

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Bazza

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NASA targets 13 landing sites on moon's south pole for human landing

NASA juggled light and dark to come up with 13 potential landing sites for the future Artemis III mission that will return humans to the lunar surface for the first time since 1972.

Key to the choices was being able to find locations that could support the duo of astronauts for 6 1/2 days on the surface with enough sunlight to provide power and thermal protection, but also give access to the dark regions of craters and mountainous terrain near the moon's south pole that could potentially hold water ice.

Finding water ice, which could be broken down into its component oxygen and hydrogen compounds to provide life-sustaining air and potential fuel, has been the driving force behind the initial Artemis missions.

The uncrewed Artemis I rocket is at the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center awaiting a potential launch as soon as Aug. 29. Artemis II is slated to fly with astronauts in 2024, but only orbit the moon. The Artemis III flight is slated for 2025, and two of its four astronauts, including the first woman, will take a version of SpaceX's Starship to the lunar surface.
 

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Bazza

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Well Space X shot another 54 Starlink satellites up last night and my whole house was shaking like crazy! These night launches are so beautiful....(go to the 9:50 mark)...

 

Bazza

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Anybody know why the strap on solid boosters on Artimis wont be retrieved and reused like they did with the shuttle?
Not only the boosters but the engines are also going to be lost.

Unlike their use on the shuttle, the Artemis 1 RS-25 engines will not be recovered for reuse. The core stage's size, as well as its altitude and speed at engine cutoff, made recovery impractical without making a significant sacrifice in cargo-carrying capability. The core stage will break apart on reentry and drop any surviving parts into the Pacific Ocean.

Like the RS-25 engines, the SLS boosters will not be recovered after they separate from the core stage at 2 minutes and 12 seconds into flight. Falling from about 142,000 feet (43.3 km), the boosters will splash down and be allowed to sink into the Atlantic Ocean roughly five and a half minutes after their launch.


Here's also a fascinating & informative article, @Bamaro - I don't think many realize how many parts on the new SLS platform were sourced from the old shuttle program......it's pretty dang cool!

 
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Bazza

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For the Artemis I mission, four veteran engines were selected, with a combined 25 flights between them, according to NASA:
  • Engine E2045: The most veteran engine with 12 flights, including a docking with Mir in 1998 and John Glenn's flight, also in 1998
  • Engine E2056: Four flights, including STS-109, a Hubble Telescope servicing trip and Columbia’s last successful mission
  • Engine E2058: Six flights, all to build the space station
  • Engine E2060: Three flights, most notably STS-135 Atlantis, the final shuttle mission
 

Bamaro

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I'm hearing now the launch probability today is 50/50 at best. Fueling issues will most likely push it past 8:33 if it gets off at all today. :(
 
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