What % do you think obesity contributes to the health problems in our country?

We_are_Bama

All-American
Dec 11, 2008
3,329
520
137
I am pretty active, physically, and regardless, I am STILL substantially heavier than I was in my 20's, which has been more than two decades ago now. I don't know how to really fight the age issue when it comes to weight. It's easy to point at someone who is 20 and say "see, they aren't overweight". Whenever someone does that, I say "yeah....give them about 7-8 more years and check again". Even before I was out of my 20's the weight was coming on. Then after 30.....BOOM. Metabolism say "been nice knowing ya"
 

CB4

Hall of Fame
Aug 8, 2011
6,024
4,714
187
Birmingham, AL
When it comes to “weight” I think a more accurate way to evaluate is fat to muscle mass ratio. I think we all know folks that based on BMI would be considered overweight or even slightly obese. However they may have very low body fat and high muscle mass.
Additionally, where you carry fat is important as well. Central obesity (carrying more fat in your abdomen and chest) generally puts you at a higher risk for things like metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and heart disease.
The main thing my physician works with on me in terms of weight management is 1) maintaining/increasing muscle mass 2) reducing belly fat 3) limiting my carbs 4) lean protein increased fiber consumption.
 

TexasBama

Hall of Fame
Jan 15, 2000
20,118
18,683
287
64
Houston, Texas USA
I remember my first Chemical Engineering class sophomore year, and the first thing we covered was

Input minus output equals accumulation

It's not a lot more complex than that. What I've seen most with people that have weight issues is lack of portion control. "Hey the salad bar is healthy", yes, but you don't need a portion so big you need a garbage can lid to hold your salad. Nor do you need a pound of croutons and a quart of dressing.
 

Bamabuzzard

FB Moderator
Aug 15, 2004
27,533
6,904
237
46
Where ever there's BBQ, Bourbon & Football
I remember my first Chemical Engineering class sophomore year, and the first thing we covered was

Input minus output equals accumulation

It's not a lot more complex than that. What I've seen most with people that have weight issues is lack of portion control. "Hey the salad bar is healthy", yes, but you don't need a portion so big you need a garbage can lid to hold your salad. Nor do you need a pound of croutons and a quart of dressing.
Yep, this is the end game of it. There are a TON of ways to get to "negative accumulation". But whichever method one uses it MUST result in more calories going out than going in.
 

NationalTitles18

TideFans Legend
May 25, 2003
26,676
28,651
262
Mountainous Northern California
The muscle loss is bad enough, but look at the bone loss!

Do the work. You'll not regret it as you age.

View attachment 26717
I had to hunt down the source (of course), so here it is:


But here's the thing:

You don't have to be a triathlete to reap the benefits of strong muscles and bones. Light to moderate exercise like walking or jogging will do the trick, and light to moderate weight training will help as well.

What I did not see mentioned are the cognitive or cardiovascular benefits, but they are just as real and the benefits come from several places when you exercise - better regulation of glucose and cholesterol, hormones that are released that benefit the brain and bone, keeping your heart strong and generally your arteries more clear of plaque, and so on and so forth.

I've literally seen folks begin eating for nutrition while watching portion sizes and still continue eating mostly what they want with some modifications (like cutting down high sugar foods and having a "cheat day" built in) and begin exercising as tolerated - some going from as little as 3 minutes tolerated a day to more than an hour - and losing anywhere from 20 to 120+ lbs and in the process correcting all sorts of metabolic problems.

Bottom line: focus on getting fit and eating for nutrition and watching portions. You don't have to be a triathlete - even light exercise will do. Start with what you can do, do it every day, and build up slowly over time (once your medical provider says you are good to go, of course). The goal isn't to deprive yourself, but to moderate and have some "cheating" built in (but also limited) and slowly build yourself up to better health. (notice I didn't say the goal is to lose the weight, though that will be a great by-product)

And (especially) women - don't get discouraged if your weight plateaus or even ticks up a bit early on (and later on as well). That's your body adding on muscle, but that muscle will increase your metabolism and that's a good thing. Checking your weight once a week is fine.

People get so easily discouraged. If someone new shows up at the gym encourage them instead of judging - it will benefit the both of you more than you know.

*Steps off soapbox.*
 

crimsonaudio

Administrator
Staff member
Sep 9, 2002
55,947
38,464
362
crimsonaudio.net
You don't have to be a triathlete to reap the benefits of strong muscles and bones. Light to moderate exercise like walking or jogging will do the trick, and light to moderate weight training will help as well.
Bingo. Too many people let 'perfect be the enemy of good'.

(not suggesting a triathlete is perfection, just making the point that doing something is better than nothing. KEEP MOVING!)
 

NationalTitles18

TideFans Legend
May 25, 2003
26,676
28,651
262
Mountainous Northern California
Bingo. Too many people let 'perfect be the enemy of good'.

(not suggesting a triathlete is perfection, just making the point that doing something is better than nothing. KEEP MOVING!)
I can't tell you how many times I've uttered a similar phrase - I've lost track.

And the story about one person in particular following the above general plan and starting out only tolerating 3 minutes of exercise/day and going on to more than an hour/day, losing 120+ lbs, and correcting glucose, cholesterol, CV, and lung problems is 100% true (haven't rechecked the fatty liver yet, but I bet that is better also). This is a personal friend, BTW.

Accept where you are, but don't accept staying there if you can help it.
 

TexasBama

Hall of Fame
Jan 15, 2000
20,118
18,683
287
64
Houston, Texas USA
Bingo. Too many people let 'perfect be the enemy of good'.

(not suggesting a triathlete is perfection, just making the point that doing something is better than nothing. KEEP MOVING!)
Eating too much and eating bad food is a bigger problem IMO. If you’re not overweight, you’ll be able to move around.
 

crimsonaudio

Administrator
Staff member
Sep 9, 2002
55,947
38,464
362
crimsonaudio.net
Eating too much and eating bad food is a bigger problem IMO. If you’re not overweight, you’ll be able to move around.
Nutrition and activity are both key. I know tons of 'skinny fat' people - people who don't overeat but don't exercise, and will end up with many of the same issues as the 74 year-old in the above post.

Bone and muscle mass loss are significant issues in the sedentary. Being healthy requires (some) diligence in both diet and exercise.
 

Bazza

TideFans Legend
Oct 1, 2011
30,906
12,082
187
New Smyrna Beach, Florida
I'll also add that a huge part of staying in shape is the mental aspect.

You'll find there are many opinions about how to develop and maintain the right mental state - or attitude.

But like many things - the ideal approach is when a person takes it on personally....and makes that decision that they really want it....and subsequently makes it a personal priority.

Also - setting goals is very important.

Speaking of triathlons......back when I was living in the Fort Myers area, I hooked up with a couple guys once a week for an after work mini-triathlon. Every Wednesday we'd meet at one of the guy's house who lived on a lake. We start with a 5K run, then a 10 mile bike ride, then finish with a 1/4 mile swim. I know the swim should be first but it just worked out better taking the swim last for some reason. If I could be as fit now as back then....and have my hair back! :LOL:
 

NationalTitles18

TideFans Legend
May 25, 2003
26,676
28,651
262
Mountainous Northern California
I'll also add that a huge part of staying in shape is the mental aspect.

You'll find there are many opinions about how to develop and maintain the right mental state - or attitude.

But like many things - the ideal approach is when a person takes it on personally....and makes that decision that they really want it....and subsequently makes it a personal priority.

Also - setting goals is very important.

Speaking of triathlons......back when I was living in the Fort Myers area, I hooked up with a couple guys once a week for an after work mini-triathlon. Every Wednesday we'd meet at one of the guy's house who lived on a lake. We start with a 5K run, then a 10 mile bike ride, then finish with a 1/4 mile swim. I know the swim should be first but it just worked out better taking the swim last for some reason. If I could be as fit now as back then....and have my hair back! :LOL:
Just like stopping smoking - you have to want to make that kind of commitment.
 

Con

Hall of Fame
Dec 19, 2006
5,631
2,743
187
Northern Hemisphere
I am like three years late reading this thread but I am looking forward to reading through the 17 pages. I too have high cholesterol, but I don't consider myself obese by any means. My numbers came back the other day and I am just having to deal with the fact that I am going to have to take a pill for the rest of my life to keep them in the safe range.
 
  • Like
Reactions: crimsonaudio

TexasBama

Hall of Fame
Jan 15, 2000
20,118
18,683
287
64
Houston, Texas USA
Nutrition and activity are both key. I know tons of 'skinny fat' people - people who don't overeat but don't exercise, and will end up with many of the same issues as the 74 year-old in the above post.

Bone and muscle mass loss are significant issues in the sedentary. Being healthy requires (some) diligence in both diet and exercise.
No doubt. I try and do some sort of physical activity every day, probably why I can still hang with the kids at the local bball court at almost 65. I’m thinking more in terms of people my age and older that don’t eat well and can barely get around, like my MIL. And a lot of these are borderline diabetic.
 
  • Like
Reactions: crimsonaudio

crimsonaudio

Administrator
Staff member
Sep 9, 2002
55,947
38,464
362
crimsonaudio.net
I am like three years late reading this thread but I am looking forward to reading through the 17 pages. I too have high cholesterol, but I don't consider myself obese by any means. My numbers came back the other day and I am just having to deal with the fact that I am going to have to take a pill for the rest of my life to keep them in the safe range.
You may be surprised at what your cholesterol does with a change in diet and exercise - I'm 50 but not on statins, and in fact my LDL (which was at above optimal / borderline high a few years ago) sits in the 60-70 range now.

Granted, how your body processes food (your genetics) plays a big role in whether or not you need medication, but you may well find that with sensible dietary changes and some healthy workouts you could end up no longer needing a pill. I know several folks who no longer need statins due to change in lifestyle.

Either way, there's no downside to healthy eating and exercise.
 

New Posts

Latest threads

Shop the TideFans.shop !


Your purchase through our TideFans.shop links helps support the site! Thanks!