Indonesia plane crash: All 189 passengers presumed dead in latest aviation disaster (Oct 2018)

TIDE-HSV

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TIDE-HSV

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Boeing sounds like they got caught with their hand in the cookie jar today. They are remorseful they were caught as being the cause of so many deaths.
They made the PR disaster even worse than it was by the deny, deny, deny tactic. I guess they took too many lessons from their pal, Trump. It was just so damned obvious from the beginning...
 

TIDE-HSV

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Excellent article. I can't say that I really learned a lot new, except for one tidbit, but it explains what happened in a manner anyone can understand it, whether he/she knows anything about aviation or software. Like a lot of flyers, I'd noticed the changes in the 737, to the point of actually wondering how they could still call it a 737. Then, I'd shrug and board. What I didn't realize until reading this article was that moving those huge engines so far forward created lift in and of itself. IOW, the plane is unstable as built. Without pilot or computer intervention, the plane would climb into a stall without the figurative stick even being pulled back. It's enough for me to avoid that plane, even after it's "fixed"...
 

TIDE-HSV

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Oh Lord! Watching "Air Disasters" by accident. Air China. They were flying an A300. The inexperienced 1st officer brushed the "go around" button by accident and the pilot couldn't physically manually overcome the computers for a normal landing, so the computers won and stalled the plane out by trying to raise the nose for a go around. The 1st officer was green and the pilot's experience was with 747s, which are not computerized like the Airbuses...
 

jthomas666

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Boeing knew about problems with the 737 Max the year before Lion Air crash

(CNN)A new statement from Boeing indicates that the aerospace manufacturer knew about a problem with the 737 Max aircraft well before the deadly October 2018 Lion Air crash, but decided not to do anything about it.

Boeing previously acknowledged that an alert system that was supposed to be a standard feature in the fleet "was not operable on all airplanes."But a statement released Sunday describes a troubling timeline that shows how long some at the company were aware of the problem before finally deciding to act.

Boeing says its senior leadership and the Federal Aviation Administration did not know about the issue until after the Lion Air crash.
 

Elefantman

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Boeing 737 Max's Autopilot Has Problem, European Regulators Find

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EASA’s checklist includes a number of issues that have been disclosed: the potential difficulty pilots have in turning the jet’s manual trim wheel,
This may become a big issue. Not all of the airline pilots today have the same stature and strength as the test pilots of the 60's who first did the certification testing of the 737.
 

TIDE-HSV

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Boeing 737 Max's Autopilot Has Problem, European Regulators Find

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This may become a big issue. Not all of the airline pilots today have the same stature and strength as the test pilots of the 60's who first did the certification testing of the 737.
The 737 Max doesn't even come close to being the same plane as the 737 of the 1960s, either. That's the major part of the problem...
 

jthomas666

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Welp...

Boeing Halting Production of 737MAX

Boeing plans to suspend production of the 737 Max starting in January as it waits for the embattled plane to be recertified to return to service, the company announced Monday.

The company's stock price closed down more than 4% Monday after early reports that Boeing (BA) might halt the plane's production began to circulate, and then fell another 0.67% after hours following the company's official announcement.

The 737 Max was grounded worldwide in March after two fatal crashes — a Lion Air jet that plunged into the Java Sea in October 2018 and an Ethiopian Airlines plane downed near Addis Ababa in March — killed 346 people. But getting the plane back in the air has proven immensely difficult, causing major financial and reputational issues for Boeing (BA).

Orders for the 737 Max dried up, and it wasn't until last month that Boeing recorded its first new orders — a total of only 30 planes — since the grounding. In the meantime, the company continued to produce the planes as it hoped for a quick recertification by airline officials around the globe.

Now that process, which has faced a number of setbacks, has been pushed into 2020 and Boeing has an inventory of more than 400 of the airplanes in storage. The company said the continued uncertainty of the 737 Max's future forced it to make the drastic move to pause the plane's production and shift its focus to delivering planes it has already produced.
 
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TexasBama

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The 737 Max doesn't even come close to being the same plane as the 737 of the 1960s, either. That's the major part of the problem...
It seems the design of the MAX should have warranted a more rigorous (or full) certification. Relocating the engines doesn't seem like a minor tweak. At least part of the reason for the software was to make plane pass a stall design criteria - keeping it from nosing up.