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NationalTitles18

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The researchers noticed a protein called HSP47 was abundant in the bears’ blood during the summer, but virtually disappeared in the winter, Thienel and her colleagues report today.

Previous work by Jon Gibbins, a cell biologist at the University of Reading, in mice had revealed that in addition to other functions, this protein sits on the surface of blood platelets involved in clot formation. Working with mice bred to lack this protein, Gibbins and his colleagues determined that platelets with less HSP47 were less likely to attract and bind to infection-fighting white blood cells called neutrophils—a key step in clot formation. “This study shows the importance of HSP47 in platelet activation,” says Nigel Mackman, who studies venous thrombosis in cancer and other diseases at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

The HSP47 on the platelets activate neutrophils, causing them to form a “net” that traps proteins, pathogens, and cells, leading to blood clots. Because hibernating bears produce less HSP47, their blood is less likely to form these nets and therefore less likely to clot, Theinel says.

Next, the researchers looked at HSP47 in people with spinal cord injuries, who—like hibernating bears—don’t seem to develop blood clots very frequently, despite being immobile for long periods of time. They found these people, too, had relatively little HSP47 compared with others who were more mobile. That suggests their bodies were toning down the production of this protein in response to being immobilized. To test that hypothesis, 10 healthy volunteers spent 27 days on bed rest while researchers monitored their HSP47 levels. Sure enough, the protein levels dropped over time. “We were really surprised that we got such a hit [with HSP47] and that it was relevant to humans,” Thienel says.

She wonders whether decreasing platelet HSP47 in people who suddenly find themselves immobilized might reduce their risk of clots until their bodies start naturally reducing the protein. But others are not yet sure of biomedical applications...

...

Nonetheless, Rodger is impressed that HSP47 seems to play the same role in both bears and people, as the work suggests this clotting mechanism evolved long ago in mammals. “It’s a fascinating finding of a potential novel mechanism” to prevent clots, he points out. It may also help cancer, surgery, and trauma patients, who are at greater risk of developing clots, he adds.

“The ideal treatment for deep vein thrombosis would prevent blood clots from forming where they aren’t supposed to, while not preventing your body’s normal blood clotting machinery” as current drugs do, says Kim Martinod, a biomedical scientist at KU Leuven. “This has the potential to be just that.”
 

OakMtn4Bama

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The researchers noticed a protein called HSP47 was abundant in the bears’ blood during the summer, but virtually disappeared in the winter, Thienel and her colleagues report today.

Previous work by Jon Gibbins, a cell biologist at the University of Reading, in mice had revealed that in addition to other functions, this protein sits on the surface of blood platelets involved in clot formation. Working with mice bred to lack this protein, Gibbins and his colleagues determined that platelets with less HSP47 were less likely to attract and bind to infection-fighting white blood cells called neutrophils—a key step in clot formation. “This study shows the importance of HSP47 in platelet activation,” says Nigel Mackman, who studies venous thrombosis in cancer and other diseases at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

The HSP47 on the platelets activate neutrophils, causing them to form a “net” that traps proteins, pathogens, and cells, leading to blood clots. Because hibernating bears produce less HSP47, their blood is less likely to form these nets and therefore less likely to clot, Theinel says.

Next, the researchers looked at HSP47 in people with spinal cord injuries, who—like hibernating bears—don’t seem to develop blood clots very frequently, despite being immobile for long periods of time. They found these people, too, had relatively little HSP47 compared with others who were more mobile. That suggests their bodies were toning down the production of this protein in response to being immobilized. To test that hypothesis, 10 healthy volunteers spent 27 days on bed rest while researchers monitored their HSP47 levels. Sure enough, the protein levels dropped over time. “We were really surprised that we got such a hit [with HSP47] and that it was relevant to humans,” Thienel says.

She wonders whether decreasing platelet HSP47 in people who suddenly find themselves immobilized might reduce their risk of clots until their bodies start naturally reducing the protein. But others are not yet sure of biomedical applications...

...

Nonetheless, Rodger is impressed that HSP47 seems to play the same role in both bears and people, as the work suggests this clotting mechanism evolved long ago in mammals. “It’s a fascinating finding of a potential novel mechanism” to prevent clots, he points out. It may also help cancer, surgery, and trauma patients, who are at greater risk of developing clots, he adds.

“The ideal treatment for deep vein thrombosis would prevent blood clots from forming where they aren’t supposed to, while not preventing your body’s normal blood clotting machinery” as current drugs do, says Kim Martinod, a biomedical scientist at KU Leuven. “This has the potential to be just that.”
Could be big down the road
 
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NationalTitles18

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That’s pretty cool. Small sample size, but of the 16, 10 didn’t have cancer return (the 8 cited, plus two others among the remaining 8) — vs. 88% fatality rate pre-vaccine.

None of it is pleasant, but pancreatic, along bone cancer and glioblastoma, are truly scary. Aggressive, painful, and deadly.

Hoping this result holds into larger samples.
I've seen far too much of those and other cancers, especially lately.

Immunotherapies are already amazing, and are only getting better.

Thank God for mRNA technology. I wish it were ready now for all cancers, especially my friend's young adult son who is dying right now.
 
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More technological progress in the wine industry, making it more environmentally friendly AND more profitable.


Precision Viticulture has been around for a few years now, but a major limitation has been getting data from the vineyard into the software. It’s pretty hard to enter data when you’re standing in the vineyard, so it’s usually been handwritten, then transcribed later. Lots of time and duplicative labor to do that.

This is a combination of desktop software and a smartphone app that provides for data entry in the field, including places that don’t have Wi-Fi or cell service.

It makes for fewer interventions (fertilizer, water, anti-fungals, treatment for disease, etc.) and the ones you do have are smaller in scope….even down to the individual vine. Less labor, less money spent on the inputs, fewer chemicals into the soil.

Another huge benefit is extending the productive life of the vine. For most wines retailing for $40 or less per bottle, vines have a useful commercial life of 15 - 20 years. Problem is that ripping out old ones and replanting is hugely expensive. Lots of labor. Then you have to buy the vine and rootstock (they’re two different things). Then you have to tend them for 3-5 years before you get commercially viable quality and quantity of fruit.

So if you can extend the commercial viability to 25 - 30 years, it has a huge and highly positive economic impact.

And in the scheme of operating a vineyard, this isn’t all that expensive. Still have the tedious process of initial data input, but massive economies after that.

I love it when being environmentally sustainable is also more profitable.
 
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OakMtn4Bama

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More technological progress in the wine industry, making it more environmentally friendly AND more profitable.


Precision Viticulture has been around for a few years now, but a major limitation has been getting data from the vineyard into the software. It’s pretty hard to enter data when you’re standing in the vineyard, so it’s usually been handwritten, then transcribed later. Lots of time and duplicative labor to do that.

This is a combination of desktop software and a smartphone app that provides for data entry in the field, including places that don’t have Wi-Fi or cell service.

It makes for fewer interventions (fertilizer, water, anti-fungals, treatment for disease, etc.) and the ones you do have are smaller in scope….even down to the individual vine. Less labor, less money spent on the inputs, fewer chemicals into the soil.

Another huge benefit is extending the productive life of the vine. For most wines retailing for $40 or less per bottle, vines have a useful commercial life of 15 - 20 years. Problem is that ripping out old ones and replanting is hugely expensive. Lots of labor. Then you have to buy the vine and rootstock (they’re two different things). Then you have to tend them for 3-5 years before you get commercially viable quality and quantity of fruit.

So if you can extend the commercial viability to 25 - 30 years, it has a huge and highly positive economic impact.

And in the scheme of operating a vineyard, this isn’t all that expensive. Still have the tedious process of initial data input, but massive economies after that.

I love it when being environmentally sustainable is also more profitable.
Some wines cost more than $40.00? :oops:
 
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More cool geeked-out stuff on viticulture. This has to do with a beneficial fungus that helps vines absorb water more efficiently and thereby better handle the droughts that are becoming more frequent with climate change.

How Mycorrhizal Fungi Create More Drought-Resistant Grapevines | SevenFifty Daily

As with a lot of things, though, it takes several years for nature to ramp up a full response, and it's that much worse if there's a plow pan below the surface. So realistically, it might be best applied to new vineyards that haven't been plowed before, or existing vineyards (or blocks of vineyards) that are being replanted in the normal life cycle of the plants.

That's because it takes 3-5 years for the plant to produce commercially viable quality and quantity of fruit anyway. So while you're waiting for the plant to develop to the point that it generates revenue, you can help the soil be a better habitat for the beneficial fungus.
 

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