Tools and Gadgets

UAH

All-American
Nov 27, 2017
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Probably 390 or stroked up to 428. These were absolutely beautiful American Iron with some of the best paint on the streets.
1962-1964 Ford This is a nice article on Ford models and engines over the period. We can dive deeper into the engine and model line but I learned a lot about the various series of engines. Still my favorite car was the 1964 Fairlane with 427 with 2 four barrels linked up to a BW 4 speed tranny.

Fords of the 1960's
 

Padreruf

Hall of Fame
Feb 12, 2001
6,919
7,978
287
71
Charleston, South Carolina
1962-1964 Ford This is a nice article on Ford models and engines over the period. We can dive deeper into the engine and model line but I learned a lot about the various series of engines. Still my favorite car was the 1964 Fairlane with 427 with 2 four barrels linked up to a BW 4 speed tranny.

Fords of the 1960's
Mine was the 1963 ½ -- with the 390cc. Automatic shifter on the floor...bucket seats. Hot -- in more ways than one. No AC...LOL...brings back memories of over 50 years ago.
 
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J0eW

2nd Team
Jul 18, 2020
319
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87
I am wondering about the pros and cons of the go-deck versus other clamping approaches. Can you provide some commentary/background on your journey?
 

BearFoot

1st Team
Mar 12, 2017
807
1,476
167
56
Fairhope, Alabama
twohandsguitars.com
I am wondering about the pros and cons of the go-deck versus other clamping approaches. Can you provide some commentary/background on your journey?
Hey JoeW…
I’ve always used a “Go-deck” when it comes to certain processes in Lutherie. The ability to join pieces (such as braces to a top or back plate) with control and precision is the reason I find it invaluable.

The top and back of my instruments are not flat…but rather, they are engineered with a 28’ or 20’ radius for added strength…which allows me to build a lighter-weight instrument without losing strength. I have radius-dishes faced with sandpaper, and use them to sand the radius into the bottom of all braces…and then use the radius dish underneath the top/back plate while gluing the braces in place.

Basically, the gluing edge of the brace (which has the radius sanded into it) is pressed against inside of the top/ back…which in turn pushes face-down into the radius dish underneath it. The fiberglass rods exert even downward pressure to the glue joint while the entire assembly is held firmly within the desired radius until dry.

I also have to sand the radius into the top and bottom edge of the rims (side assembly) so that the curvature of the top and back plates will marry up precisely. Then again, I use the “Go-deck“ to glue the back to the rims…and finally, the top to the rims…

DC5E65CC-265C-4E38-B185-AD97049A677C.jpeg
 
Last edited:

Bazza

TideFans Legend
Oct 1, 2011
30,918
12,126
187
New Smyrna Beach, Florida
I just acquired a neat little tool. It's a cordless cutter.

Back story: I have a plant collection that is continually growing and when dealing with so many varieties it helps to keep them properly labeled.

I like the larger labels that are easy to see and have been buying the 10" long white plastic "stakes" - but after a while the costs add up. The other day I was trying to figure out a way to DIY some. I had a section of vinyl (PVC) fencing that I had salvaged and in looking at it figured it might be the ticket.

Trying to cut through the plastic with a stanley knife, snips, heavy duty scissors proved cumbersome so I found a little motorized unit and was able to try it out today and it worked great! It was around $30 on Amazon, in case anyone is interested.

The store bought labels are on the right and the homemade ones on the left:

IMG_4143.JPG

The fence section (I cut the section into desired lengths with my Hackzall) plus the cutter:

IMG_4144.JPG

IMG_4146.JPGIMG_4151.JPGIMG_4152.JPGIMG_4149.JPGIMG_4148.JPG

Sorry for the blurry pics!
 

UAH

All-American
Nov 27, 2017
3,011
3,080
187
I just acquired a neat little tool. It's a cordless cutter.

Back story: I have a plant collection that is continually growing and when dealing with so many varieties it helps to keep them properly labeled.

I like the larger labels that are easy to see and have been buying the 10" long white plastic "stakes" - but after a while the costs add up. The other day I was trying to figure out a way to DIY some. I had a section of vinyl (PVC) fencing that I had salvaged and in looking at it figured it might be the ticket.

Trying to cut through the plastic with a stanley knife, snips, heavy duty scissors proved cumbersome so I found a little motorized unit and was able to try it out today and it worked great! It was around $30 on Amazon, in case anyone is interested.

The store bought labels are on the right and the homemade ones on the left:

View attachment 23938

The fence section (I cut the section into desired lengths with my Hackzall) plus the cutter:

View attachment 23939

View attachment 23940View attachment 23943View attachment 23944View attachment 23942View attachment 23941

Sorry for the blurry pics!
I used to make plant labels from venetian blind slats for our Master Gardener plant sale. I would take out the string, bundle and tape the slats, mark and cut them to length with a power miter saw. Wood, metal or vinyl blinds make great plant labels.
I did hundreds of labels all nicely bundled. Before they had sat around in a quilting circle and cut them with scissors. They were appreciative that I could do 500 - 600 labels in a small amount of time.
 

Bazza

TideFans Legend
Oct 1, 2011
30,918
12,126
187
New Smyrna Beach, Florida
Had a conversation with another landscape friend and told him about my Milwaukee Hackzall and what a great little tool for work in our field. I emailed him links to where he could get one at the best price and the carbide blades I used with mine. Photos of mine, etc.

He came to my house last week to pick up some plants I got for him and while there I showed him my Hackzall and he said he ended up finding one made by Ryobi at the Tool Mart in Daytona. Said he already had Ryobi cordless tools so it made sense to stick with that line. I didn't know Ryobi even made one so I did some digging and found an eBay seller selling brand new ones for a lot less than HD and ordered one figuring why not have another as back up. Plus I was curious to compare with my Milwaukee.

It came via UPS the other day and there were 3 issues I found.

1. Noisier
2. Finger trigger uncomfortable
3. Lock-out button kept getting pushed while using it

So I resolved #2 and #3 by applying Super Glue to the Lock-out button (in the on position) and then used a cutoff wheel to trim the annoying tab under the trigger. Then I cut off the Lock-out buttons all together.

I can't do anything about the noise but at least now I can grab it and run it fairly comfortably without the other issues.

IMG_4470.JPGIMG_4471.JPGIMG_4474.JPGIMG_4484.JPG
 

Bazza

TideFans Legend
Oct 1, 2011
30,918
12,126
187
New Smyrna Beach, Florida
I've had one of these on my front hose bib and decided to get a couple more for my other hose bibs because I like them so much.

I keep hoses attached to all my hose bibs - so these come in handy when I just want to wash off my hands or fill something with water without using the hose. I use those expandable hoses on all but one of my bibs....

IMG_4856.JPGIMG_4857.JPGIMG_4859.JPG
 

seebell

Hall of Fame
Mar 12, 2012
11,308
3,910
187
Gurley, Al
My son just tried some of this. It really works. Have you ever replaced a toilet and when you tilted it water went every where? Use this and there will be no mess. Boggles my mind. Kinda like dehydrated water!!

1656552178648.png

 

TIDE-HSV

Senior Administrator
Staff member
Oct 13, 1999
80,167
30,068
437
Huntsville, AL,USA
I just acquired a neat little tool. It's a cordless cutter.

Back story: I have a plant collection that is continually growing and when dealing with so many varieties it helps to keep them properly labeled.

I like the larger labels that are easy to see and have been buying the 10" long white plastic "stakes" - but after a while the costs add up. The other day I was trying to figure out a way to DIY some. I had a section of vinyl (PVC) fencing that I had salvaged and in looking at it figured it might be the ticket.

Trying to cut through the plastic with a stanley knife, snips, heavy duty scissors proved cumbersome so I found a little motorized unit and was able to try it out today and it worked great! It was around $30 on Amazon, in case anyone is interested.

The store bought labels are on the right and the homemade ones on the left:

View attachment 23938

The fence section (I cut the section into desired lengths with my Hackzall) plus the cutter:

View attachment 23939

View attachment 23940View attachment 23943View attachment 23944View attachment 23942View attachment 23941

Sorry for the blurry pics!
Wonder if that would cut Plexiglas...
 

J0eW

2nd Team
Jul 18, 2020
319
476
87
My son just tried some of this. It really works. Have you ever replaced a toilet and when you tilted it water went every where? Use this and there will be no mess. Boggles my mind. Kinda like dehydrated water!!

View attachment 26152

I wonder if this stuff is related to the moisture trapping crystals that are used to dry areas which have gotten wet/damp? I used these to dry out my Honda Accord when my sunroof drains got clogged.
 
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Bazza

TideFans Legend
Oct 1, 2011
30,918
12,126
187
New Smyrna Beach, Florida
Wonder if that would cut Plexiglas...
IMO, the plexiglass would have to be very thin. This tool isn't very heavy duty, if you get my meaning.

---------------
Meanwhile this morning I noticed the magic marker names are fading out on me.

I picked up this type of marker so we'll see if it helps.

IMG_4863.JPG
 

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